Save

The role of donor and receiver size in the response to public cues in Hart’s rivulus, Anablepsoides hartii

In: Behaviour
Authors:
Veronica GrovesDepartment of Biology, Concordia University: 7141 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, QC, Canada H4B 1R6

Search for other papers by Veronica Groves in
https://brill.com/search?f_0=author&q_0=Veronica+Groves
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Chris K. ElvidgeDepartment of Biology, Concordia University: 7141 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, QC, Canada H4B 1R6

Search for other papers by Chris K. Elvidge in
https://brill.com/search?f_0=author&q_0=Chris+K.+Elvidge
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Grant E. BrownDepartment of Biology, Concordia University: 7141 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, QC, Canada H4B 1R6

Search for other papers by Grant E. Brown in
https://brill.com/search?f_0=author&q_0=Grant+E.+Brown
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3493-3477
Download Citation Get Permissions

Access options

Get access to the full article by using one of the access options below.

Institutional Login

Log in with Open Athens, Shibboleth, or your institutional credentials

Login via Institution

Purchase

Buy instant access (PDF download and unlimited online access):

$34.95

Abstract

Aquatic prey use chemical alarm cues as public information sources to optimize behavioural decisions. Recent studies suggest that the contextual value of these cues is shaped by their source, the size of the donor relative to the receiver, and the size of the receiver itself. Here, we exposed Hart’s rivulus (Anablepsoides hartii) to conspecific or heterospecific alarm cues from donors that were either smaller or larger than the mean focal rivulus size. Smaller rivulus reduced foraging in response to conspecific and heterospecific cues, regardless of donor size. However, larger rivulus exhibited no reduction in foraging towards small conspecific cues and increased foraging towards small heterospecific cues. Additionally, while conspecific donors elicited strong predator avoidance, rivulus exhibited stronger responses to large vs. small heterospecific cues. Our results demonstrate that the value of alarm cues is shaped by the interacting effects of receiver size and the size and species of cue donors.

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 161 161 161
Full Text Views 2 2 2
PDF Views & Downloads 3 3 3