American Hasidic Yiddish Pedagogical Materials: A Sociological and Sociolinguistic Survey of 50 Years of Post-War Publishing

in Journal of Jewish Languages
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

Abstract

After arriving in the United States after WWII, Hasidic Jews quickly established educational publishing houses in Yiddish in New York. How these publications developed and changed from the 1950s to the present day reveals a great deal about how Hasidim adjusted to American life, how their Yiddish changed during this period, and how competing linguistic ideologies emerged to address these changes. This article provides an overview of three generations of American Hasidic Yiddish pedagogical materials, using a sample of books, oral-medium games, and a family magazine’s children’s section. It uses close reading and sociolinguistic analysis to examine how the perception of Yiddish among Hasidim evolved into perceiving the language as a semi-holy tongue uniquely capable of transmitting religious and cultural values. This article will explore how this changing perception has caused Hasidic communities to reevaluate how they seek to transmit the language to future generations.

American Hasidic Yiddish Pedagogical Materials: A Sociological and Sociolinguistic Survey of 50 Years of Post-War Publishing

in Journal of Jewish Languages

Sections

References

  • AppleblomePeter. 2008. “Growing Pains of a Hasidic Village as it Gets Younger, and Bigger, with Age.” The New York Times. December 10.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • BamuelD. Simon. 2006. Sacred Speakers: Languages and Culture among Haredim in Israel. New York: Bergham Books.

  • BirnbaumSolomon. 1979. Yiddish: A Survey and Grammar. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

  • Epl tsu epl. circa 2007. (Yiddish translation of the card-game Apples to Apples) Monroe NY: Kindershpiel Publishing.

  • FaderAyala. 2009. Mitzvah Girls: Bringing Up the Next Generation of Hasidic Jews in Brooklyn. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • FishmanJoshua A. 1969. “Language Maintenance and Language Shift: Yiddish and Other Immigrant Languages in the U.S.” YIVO Annual of Jewish Social Science 14: 1226.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • FishmanJoshua A. 1991. Yiddish: Turning to Life. Philadelphia: John Benjamins.

  • FridmanLipa. 1960. Dos idishe yor: tekst bukh far religiyeze meydl shules [The Jewish Year: Textbook for Religious Girls’ Schools]. Brooklyn, NY: Tiferes Publishing.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • How Many Jews Were Murdered in Each Country? Yad Vashem Holocaust Resource Center. Available online at: http://www.yadvashem.org/yv/en/holocaust/resource_center/faq.asp.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Idish Leyenbukh 9. [Yiddish reader 9]. 1992. Brooklyn, NY: Bais Rochel Publishing.

  • IrvineJ.T. & S. Gal. 2000. “Language Ideology and Linguistic Differentiation.” In Regimes of Language ed. P. Kroskrity. Santa Fe, NM: School of American Research Press3583.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • IsaacsM. & Lewis Glinert eds. 1990. Pious Voices: Languages among Ultra-Orthodox Jews. International Journal of the Sociology of Language138Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • JofenJean. 1964. A Linguistic Atlas of Eastern European Yiddish. New York: Brooklyn College.

  • KatzDovid. 2004. Words on Fire: The Unfinished Story of Yiddish. New York: Basic Books.

  • Language Map Data Center. Modern Language Association. Available online at: https://www.mla.org/map_data.

  • Mayles 2002. vol. 6.68 (April).

  • Mayles 2006. vol. 10.119 (August).

  • Mayles. 2008. vol. 12.137 (February).

  • Mayles 2010. vol. 14.167 (August).

  • PennAscher. 1958. Yidishkayt in Amerike [Judaism in America]. New York: Self published.

  • PollSolomon. 1962. The Hasidic Community of Williamsburg; A Study in the Sociology of Religion. New York: Schocken Books.

  • SchaechterMordkhe. 2005. Di Geviksn-Velt in Yidish [Plant Names in Yiddish: A Handbook of Botanical Terminology]. New York: League for Yiddish/YIVO Institute for Jewish Research.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • SchaechterRukhl. 2011. “Loshn-koydesh iz nisht far meydlekh” [The holy-tongue is not for girls]. Yiddish Forward. 11 March: 9.

  • TeitelbaumJoel. 1958. Vayoel Moshe. New York: Satmar Publishing (in Yiddish).

Index Card

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 129 102 7
Full Text Views 198 197 0
PDF Downloads 18 17 0
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0