Epistemic Vigilance and the Science/Religion Distinction

In: Journal of Cognition and Culture
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  • 1 Society & Cognition Unit, University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland

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Abstract

Both science and religion are human endeavours that recruit and modify pre-existing human capacity to engage in epistemic vigilance. However, while science relies upon a focus on content vigilance, religion focusses on source vigilance. This difference is due, in turn, to the function of religious claims not being connected to their accuracy – unlike the function of scientific claims. Understanding this difference helps to understand many aspects of scientific and religious institutions.

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