Not Just Another Pint! The Role of Emotion Induced by Music on the Consumer’s Tasting Experience

in Multisensory Research
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Abstract

We introduce a novel methodology to assess the influence of the emotion induced by listening to music on the consumer’s multisensory tasting experience. These crossmodal effects were analyzed when two contrasting music tracks (positive vs negative emotion) were presented to consumers while tasting beer. The results suggest that the emotional reactions triggered by the music influenced specific aspects of the multisensory tasting experience. Participants liked the beer more, and rated it as tasting sweeter, when listening to music associated with positive emotion. The same beer was rated as more bitter, with higher alcohol content, and as having more body, when the participants listened to music associated with negative emotion. Moreover, participants were willing to pay 7–8% more for the beer that was tasted while they listened to positive music. This novel methodology was subsequently replicated with two different styles of beer. These results are discussed along with practical implications concerning the way in which music can add significant value to how a consumer responds to a brand.

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Figures
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    Main characteristics of the experimental music tracks analyzed in this pre-test

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    (Continued)

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    Descriptive statistics for positive and negative emotional scores for each music track. Means and corresponding SDs

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    Differences between the means of the music tracks (asterisk ‘*’ indicates a significant difference at p<0.001). In the positive emotion scores, we see that the differences between Positive 1 and Negative 2, between Positive 2 and Negative 2, and between Negative 1 and Positive 2 are more pronounced, as compared to the other mean differences. When it comes to the negative emotion scores, the differences between Positive 1 and Negative 2, and between the Positive 2 and Negative 2, stand out from the rest

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    Means and SD of ratings related to the participants’ beer evaluation, for hedonic and sensory ratings in Experiment 1. The first two rows are a comparison of the ratings of participants on the silent condition (first row), and music condition (second row; negative + positive music effects). The third and fourth rows are a comparison of the results of the music condition, disentagling negative vs positive effects. The results that are highlighted in bold show a significant difference between the two corresponding conditions

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    Means and SD (SD values in parenthesis) of ratings related to the participants’ beer evaluation for hedonic and sensory ratings in Experiment 2. The first two rows provide a comparison of the ratings of participants while listening to the Negative vs Positive (Positive 1 + Positive 2) music. The third and fourth rows are a comparison of the ratings of participants while listening to the Positive 1 vs Positive 2 music. Results highlighted in bold show a significant difference between the two corresponding conditions

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    Interaction effect in repeated-measures analysis, for the sensory evaluation of the beer in Experiment 2. The X-axis represents the within-participants analysis (positive vs negative music). The Y-axes represent the estimated marginal mean ratings of each flavor attribute — e.g., ‘A’ for sweetness, and ‘D’ for alcohol strength (with the full-scale going from 1 to 7). Positive 1 results are represented with dashed lines, whereas Positive 2 results are represented with solid lines.

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    Means and SD of ratings related to the participants’ beer evaluation in Experiment 3. The first two rows are a comparison of the ratings of participants while listening to the Negative vs Positive (Positive 1 + Positive 2) music conditions. The third and fourth rows provide a comparison of the ratings of participants while listening to the Positive 1 vs Positive 2 music conditions. Results highlighted in bold show a significant difference between the two corresponding conditions

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    Interaction effect in repeated measures analysis, for the sensory evaluation of the beer in Experiment 3. The X-axis represents the within-participants analysis (positive vs negative music). The Y-axes represent the estimated marginal mean ratings of each flavor attribute — e.g., ‘A’ for sweetness, and ‘D’ for alcohol strength (with the full-scale going from 1 to 7). Positive 1 results are represented with dashed lines, whereas Positive 2 results are represented with solid lines.

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