Antagonistic role of the microbiome from a Meloidogyne hapla-suppressive soil against species of plant-parasitic nematodes with different life strategies

In: Nematology

Summary

In certain soils populations of plant-parasitic nematodes (PPN) decline. Understanding this effect may open up environmentally friendly management options. We identified such a suppressive soil containing virtually no PPN. Inoculated Meloidogyne hapla declined in this soil more than in a control soil and reproduction on tomato was reduced. The extracted soil microbiome alone decreased root invasion of second-stage juveniles (J2) and progeny as well as the native soil. We tested the antagonistic potential against PPN that differ in life strategies. The microbiome was most suppressive against two populations of M. hapla and one population of Pratylenchus neglectus, and least suppressive against M. incognita and the ectoparasite Hemicycliophora conida. In a split-root system with M. hapla, plant-mediated but not direct effects of the microbiome significantly reduced root invasion of J2, while direct exposure of M. hapla to the microbiome significantly affected reproduction. Overall, both plant-mediated and direct effects of the microbiome were responsible for the soil suppressiveness against M. hapla.

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