Socio-economic and Socio-political Origins of Technocratic Populism in the Czech Republic and Nativism in Hungary

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  • 1 Institute of Philosophy and Sociology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland

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Abstract

This article investigates the socio-economic and socio-political origins of populism in the Czech Republic and Hungary, discussing the reasons for the national specificity of the populism. Despite the similar triggers that had led to the strengthening of the populists, the nature of the populism in these countries is different. In the Czech Republic, populism has a technocratic nature, while in Hungary—a nativist. I presume that the rise of the unemployment rate as the result of the 2008 Great Recession contributed to the decline in the confidence towards the national and the EU parliament as well as to the rise of the negative attitudes towards migrants. In their turn, the lower level of institutional trust and the negative attitudes towards the migrants correlate with the voting for the populist parties on the national and the European elections.

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