The Blood of Others

Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Simone de Beauvoir

In: Simone de Beauvoir Studies
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  • 1 CNRS/École Normale Supérieure, Archives Husserl de Paris
Translator: Jennifer McWeeny
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  • CNRS/École Normale Supérieure, Archives Husserl de Paris

Abstract

The author argues, with reference to a number of Merleau-Ponty’s unpublished manuscripts, that the philosopher’s notion of encroachment (empiétement) has origins in Simone de Beauvoir’s 1945 novel The Blood of Others. He examines how the two philosophers approach the encroachment of freedoms, the political stance of pacifism, and the interpretation of Voltaire’s Candide (Part I). The impact of Élisabeth Lacoin’s death on Beauvoir’s and Merleau-Ponty’s philosophies, as well as their relationships with Jean-Paul Sartre is also considered (Part II).