A catalogue of the Coleoptera of the Dutch Antilles

In: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie

This paper presents a first critical review of the beetle species (Insecta: Coleoptera) reported from the (former) Dutch Antilles as well as a history of beetle collecting and collectors on the islands. The introductory section provides a concise overview of the location, climate, geology and vegetation of the six islands. The catalogue is concluded with miscellaneous additions, corrections and annotations to the published records of the other islands of the northern Leeward Islands, and a comprehensive bibliography. (ZooBank registration: http://zoobank.org/ E2D76464-5AAE-4D75-9AC5-CA119E65D72A

Abstract

This paper presents a first critical review of the beetle species (Insecta: Coleoptera) reported from the (former) Dutch Antilles as well as a history of beetle collecting and collectors on the islands. The introductory section provides a concise overview of the location, climate, geology and vegetation of the six islands. The catalogue is concluded with miscellaneous additions, corrections and annotations to the published records of the other islands of the northern Leeward Islands, and a comprehensive bibliography. (ZooBank registration: http://zoobank.org/ E2D76464-5AAE-4D75-9AC5-CA119E65D72A

Keywords:

E.O. Colijn*, J.T. Smit, European Invertebrate Survey, PO Box 9517, 2300 RA Leiden, The Netherlands. ed.colijn@naturalis.nl

K.K. Beentjes, R. Butôt, J.A. Miller, A.J. de Winter, B. van der Hoorn, Naturalis Biodiversity Center, PO Box 9517, 2300 RA Leiden, The Netherlands

Introduction

Little has changed since Wallace (1876) and almost a century later Geijskes & Wagenaar Hummelinck (1951) wrote that only few have occupied themselves with the entomology of the Antilles. There is still a lot more to discover than is known at present about the islands’ insect fauna. Ivie et al. (2008a) discuss the considerable challenges of conducting invertebrate inventories in the Antilles. Major problems are caused by the so-called taxonomic impediment, i.e. the gap in our taxonomic knowledge and the shortage of trained taxonomists for the Antillean region. As far as the Coleoptera are concerned the only relatively well-studied groups in the Antilles comprise the larger species of families such as the Carabidae, Scarabaeidae, Cerambycidae and Tenebrionidae. Bright (2019) recently published a comprehensive review of the Scolytinae which is now probably the best studied group in the Antilles. For most other groups modern revisions are lacking. The number of new provisional and genus-level records in this paper and others (e.g. Ivie et al. 2008b) illustrate that fact.

Peck (2011, 2016) recently published an overview of the beetles of the Lesser Antilles, including the northern Dutch Antilles. These papers are largely based on Blackwelder’s (1944–1957) “Checklist of the coleopterous insects of Mexico, Central America, the West Indies, and South America”. The present report offers a first critical review of all published records of the islands of the Dutch Antilles including information about their collectors and important collections. A number of new island records for the Dutch Antilles are also added, as well as corrections and additions to the checklists by Blackwelder (1944–1957) and Peck (2011, 2016) for the non-Dutch northern Leeward Islands.

The islands of the (former) Dutch Antilles

The (former) Dutch Antilles comprise the islands Aruba, Bonaire and Curaçao (also called the ABC islands) in the Leeward Antilles near the northeastern Venezuelan coast and Saba, St. Eustatius and St. Maarten in the northern Leeward Islands (Fig. 1). The two islands groups are approximately 900 km apart. St. Maarten is the southern part of the island St. Martin which is politically divided between the Netherlands and France (Fig. 2). Saba (Fig. 3), St. Eustatius (Fig. 4) and Bonaire (Fig. 5) are currently special municipalities of the Netherlands while Aruba (Fig. 6), Curaçao (Fig. 7) and St. Maarten are independent countries within the Kingdom of The Netherlands. The former French part of St. Martin is a separate overseas collectivity (collectivité d’outre-mer) of France. For convenience the term “former” is omitted in the rest of the text. Table 1 gives the basic properties and the number of Coleoptera species currently known for each island.

Figure 1.
Figure 1.

The (former) Dutch Antilles. Aruba, Bonaire, and Curaçao are part of the Leeward Antilles; Saba, St. Eustatius, and St. Martin are part of the Leeward Islands.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Figure 2.
Figure 2.

St. Maarten (southern part) / St. Martin (northern part). © OpenStreetMap (and) contributors, CC-BY-SA.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Figure 3.
Figure 3.

Saba. © OpenStreetMap (and) contributors, CC-BY-SA.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Figure 4.
Figure 4.

St. Eustatius. © OpenStreetMap (and) contributors, CC-BY-SA.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Figure 5.
Figure 5.

Bonaire. © OpenStreetMap (and) contributors, CC-BY-SA.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Figure 6.
Figure 6.

Aruba. © OpenStreetMap (and) contributors, CC-BY-SA.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Figure 7.
Figure 7.

Curaçao. © OpenStreetMap (and) contributors, CC-BY-SA.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

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Climate

The islands of the Leeward Antilles are situated in the Southern Caribbean Dry Zone and have a semi-arid tropical marine climate. The mean annual precipitation amounts to 550 mm with a large year-to-year variation: the standard deviation is larger than the mean. Rain falls irregularly, chiefly in short-lived showers that are often local. There is a “dry season” from February till September. The amount of precipitation during these months is about 200 mm in Curaçao and Bonaire, and less than 150 mm in Aruba. In the “rainy season”, from October till January, the average precipitation lies between 300 and 350 mm. Temperatures are rather constant over the year with a difference of only 3°C in average daily temperatures. The average annual temperature in the Leeward Antilles is approximately 28°C. The Leeward Antilles are located on the southern boundary of the Atlantic hurricane region and, contrary to the Leeward Islands, the hurricane experience level for the islands is considered to be very small. Roughly once every 100 years considerable damage has been experienced by a hurricane passing over the islands (Martis et al. 2002, MDNA&A 2009, 2010, CBS 2010, 2011).

Saba, St. Eustatius and St. Martin have a wetter tropical marine climate. With a mean annual precipitation of around 1000 mm, the Leeward Islands receive about twice as much rain as the islands of the Leeward Antilles. However, all weather stations are located in lowland areas and rainfall on the mountains of Saba and St. Eustatius is certainly higher, possibly as much as twice the amount the lowlands receive. The wettest months, with an average monthly precipitation between 90 and 150 mm, are August till December. There is a relatively dry period between January and April. As on the islands of the Leeward Antilles, temperatures are rather constant over the year with an average annual temperature of about 27°C. The Leeward Islands are located within the Atlantic hurricane belt. The “official” Atlantic hurricane season runs from June through November but occasionally starts as early as May and may extend to December. Almost every year at least one tropical cyclone comes within a range of 100 nautical miles and on average once every four to five years hurricane conditions are experienced on the islands. The most recent hurricane was the extremely powerful and catastrophic hurricane Irma which hit the islands in September 2017. It was the first category 5 hurricane on record to strike the Leeward Islands (MDNA&A 2009, 2010, CBS 2010).

Geology

Aruba, Bonaire, and Curaçao lie along the crest of the so-called Leeward Antilles ridge. This ridge was formed by a series of complicated tectonic interactions between the Caribbean and South American plates. Although considered continental islands, the Leeward Antilles ridge is actually located between the Caribbean and the South American plates with Bonaire and Curaçao both separated from the Venezuelan mainland, and each other, by more than 1000 m deep seas. Aruba is the only island that is separated from the Venezuelan mainland by a relatively shallow sea with a maximum depth of approximately 180 m. The islands of this group are relatively flat and consist of volcanic rocks partly covered with marine sediments and limestone deposits (Wagenaar Hummelinck 1940, Hippolyte & Mann 2011, Schmutz et al. 2017).

The Leeward Islands form a double arc of two geologically different groups of islands. St. Eustatius and Saba are part of the inner arc consisting of relatively young and active high volcanic islands. The former has two volcanic areas. The northern hills are the remnants of an extinct 500 million-year-old volcano. The southern Quill, is a dormant 601 m high stratovolcano that has not erupted for more than 1600–1700 years. On the southern side of the Quill lies a steep limestone cliff, an uplifted and tilted part of marine sediment of shallow-water origin that was displaced by submarine volcanic activity. During the Last Glacial Maximum St. Eustatius was connected to the neighbouring islands St. Kitts and Nevis. Mount Scenery (887 m) on Saba is also a dormant volcano although it is considered potentially active. It last erupted around the time the first European settlers arrived in 1640. Saba is very mountainous with steep slopes and ravines. Saba’s cliffs drop off precipitously into the surrounding sea. The island is separated from the nearby Saba Bank by a 600–700 m deep trough and was probably never connected to any other land mass. St. Martin is located in the outer arc. The islands of this arc are lower and are eroded remnants of extinct volcanoes that have been covered with marine sediments and limestone deposits. During the Last Glacial Maximum St. Martin was connected to the neighbouring islands Anguilla and St. Barthélemy (Westerman 1957, Westermann & Kiel 1961, Roobol & Smith 2004, de Freitas et al. 2014, 2016).

Vegetation

Due to the combined effects of the arid climate, overgrazing by introduced goats and donkeys, and the felling of trees in the past the natural vegetation on the Leeward Antilles is dominated by secondary scrub communities. Grazing has also led to the dominance of thorny and grazing-resistant species. On the northeastern coasts the soil is fully exposed to the prevailing trade winds and the landscape has a rough and arid appearance with little vegetation. On the more sheltered coasts beach vegetation can be found, in some parts connected to mangrove swamps (Fig. 8). Inland the islands are sparsely vegetated with cactus scrub and thorny woodlands (Fig. 9) which are partly evergreen and partly deciduous (Wagenaar Hummelinck 1940, Stoffers 1956, Beers et al. 1997, de Freitas et al. 2005).

Figure 8.
Figure 8.

Mangrove forest in Lac Bay, Bonaire National Marine Park. Photo: Jaap Winkelman.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Figure 9.
Figure 9.

Cactus scrub and thorny woodlands, Rincon, Bonaire. Photo: Jaap Winkelman.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Saba, St. Eustatius and St. Martin are wetter and are less subject to trade winds. Although lying relatively close together, the islands all have their own characteristics. On Saba the lower arid hills up to approximately 200 m are covered with Croton thickets that are very poor in plant species. Above this area secondary woodlands can be found. These woodlands are partly derived from dry evergreen forest and partly from seasonal forest. The volcanic slopes between 400 and 800 m were largely covered by rainforest and palm brake in former times. At present, these slopes host secondary rainforest vegetation which includes up to 4 m tall tree ferns. The top of Mt. Scenery supports montane cloud forest (Fig. 10).

Figure 10.
Figure 10.

Cloud forest on Mt. Scenery. Photo: Michiel Boeken.

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The (semi-)natural vegetation on St. Eustatius is largely limited to the two volcanic areas and the coast. The central part of the island around Oranjestad consists of an open urbanised and (former) agricultural plain called the Cultuurvlakte. Along the coasts some small sandy beaches can be found (Fig. 11). The northern hills are relatively dry. The vegetation consists of open, grassy shrubland and dry forest that is partly evergreen and partly deciduous. The vegetation on the Quill (Fig. 12) is very diverse and ranges from dry deciduous forest with relatively low trees on the lower slopes to humid evergreen forest with trees up to 40 metres high on the bottom of the crater (Fig. 13).

Figure 11.
Figure 11.

Small sandy beach with the Quill in the background, Zeelandia, St. Eustatius. Photo: Roland Butôt.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Figure 12.
Figure 12.

The Quill, view from the crater rim inside the crater. Photo: Marijke Kanters

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Figure 13.
Figure 13.

Part of the team next to buttress-rooted trees at the bottom of the Quill. From left to right: Kevin Beentjes, Roland Butôt, Jeroen van der Brugge and Berry van der Hoorn. Photo: Berry van der Hoorn.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Due to intense agricultural development in the past St. Martin is now largely covered by secondary vegetation derived from seasonal or dry evergreen forests. There are just a few small areas located on the hills and peaks with original semi-evergreen seasonal forest. The secondary vegetation ranges from Croton thickets to thorny shrubland and woods. The coastal area hosts diverse landscapes with many bays and lagoons, steep rocky cliffs and sandy beaches. Along the coasts and the inland waterways small remnants of mangrove forests and other types of coastal vegetation can be found (Stoffers 1956, Rojer 1997a, 1997b, 1997c, de Freitas et al. 2014, 2016, van Andel et al. 2016).

Methods

Bibliographic study

To compile this catalogue the first author conducted an extensive study of the literature. Peck (2011, 2016) served as an excellent starting point for the Dutch northern Antilles. For the southern Dutch Antilles no such comprehensive review was available and the literature is very scattered. The Zoological Record (1864 to present), Google Scholar and WorldCat were used to search for literature records. Although riddled with errors and unreferenced deletions, the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) holds useful information and was critically screened for additional species records. The citizen-science websites Observation.org and iNaturalist were also screened for additional species records with photos. All species references listed in papers pertaining to (former) Dutch Antillean island records were checked, going back to the first published island records as well as the original descriptions of each species.

Data included

The first part of this catalogue provides an overview of collectors that have been active in the Dutch Antilles. In the following systematic catalogue all Dutch Antillean Coleoptera records based on preserved museum specimens (vouchers) are listed (see also Table 2). If these are unclear or records are solely based on photos the records are considered provisional, the island name is placed within square brackets and an annotation is added. We did not include species recorded without vouchers for which voucher-based records have already been published. Clearly erroneous or unlikely records in GBIF were discarded without comment. All records in Touroult’s GBIF datasets (Touroult 2019a, b) are listed as “human observation” but about 90% of his data are based on vouchers (Touroult in litt. 2020). As such, all his GBIF records are included here.

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For each entry the species name, author, island name, reference and if available exact location and collector of vouchers (or observer in case of records from the citizen-science websites iNaturalis and Observation.org) are listed. In case of a formal species description a comma is included in the citation. All other citations are listed without this comma and with a colon between the species name and the author. No division has been made between the Dutch and French parts of St. Martin and all records of this island are included. Erroneous or questionable records for the Dutch Antilles are treated in a separate chapter.

While working on the catalogue a number of errors and omissions were discovered in Peck’s (2011, 2016) checklists including records for the other islands of the northern Leeward Islands (Anguilla, Antigua, Barbuda, Nevis, St. Barthélemy and St. Kitts and here also including Montserrat). Various records from recent publications and citizen-science records have also been added to his checklists. As far as species present on the Dutch islands are concerned, corrections and (provisional) additions to Peck (2011, 2016) are included in the main text of the systematic catalogue. Annotations on species not present on the Dutch islands are listed in a separate final chapter.

Classification and taxonomy

For convenience the (sub)familial level classification of the most recent review of the beetles of the Lesser Antilles (Peck 2016) is followed. This is that of Arnett & Thomas (2001) and Arnett et al. (2002), modified from Lawrence & Newton (1995). The taxonomic ranks tribe, subtribe, subgenus and subspecies are not used. Species names are arranged alphabetically.

Field work

The St. Eustatius Scientific Terrestrial Expedition (Fig. 13) took place from 2 to 18 October 2015 and was organised by Naturalis Biodiversity Center in cooperation with the St. Eustatius National Parks Foundation (STENAPA). The expedition formed the main reason to start compiling this catalogue.

A team of researchers of Naturalis, the European Invertebrate Survey The Netherlands (EIS), the Dutch Mammal Society (VZZ), the Reptile, Amphibian & Fish Conservation Netherlands (RAVON) and students led by the last author conducted a rapid inventory of the biodiversity of the island. All authors collected Coleoptera during the expedition. Unless stated otherwise in the text, these were identified by the first author and are now partly housed in the author’s private collection and partly in the collection of Naturalis Biodiversity Center. R. Butôt was responsible for laboratory logistics.

The primary aim of the expedition was to investigate which taxonomic groups could stand as surrogates for others in conservation assessments. To this end, 11 plots measuring 25 × 25 m were set out in which plants, vertebrates, gastropods and selected arthropods were sampled using several techniques including beating, sweeping, sieving, yellow pan, pitfall, Malaise and Winkler traps (Fig. 14). The results of this systematic research study will be published elsewhere (see also Miller et al. 2017, 2019).

Figure 14.
Figure 14.

Ed Colijn sampling beetles in one of the plots at The Quill, St. Eustatius (4-x-2015). Photo: Elisabeth Haber.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

The expedition further aimed at collecting baseline data on the biodiversity of St. Eustatius as a whole. In some of the plots light traps were set up. Outside the plots specific habitats such as dung, carrion (Fig. 15), dead wood, washed-up seaweed, small pools and water reservoirs were sampled (Figs 16, 17). A separate Malaise trap was set up on the slopes of the Quill. The results of this more opportunistic sampling approach are included in this paper.

Figure 15.
Figure 15.

Collecting beetles from the corpse of a dead cow, Oranjestad, St. Eustatius (11-x-2015). Location of new island records for Dermestes maculatus, Necrobia rufipes and Omorgus suberosus. Photo: Roland Butôt.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Figure 16.
Figure 16.

Kevin Beentjes sampling beetles from a small muddy pool at Venus Bay, St. Eustatius (10-x-2015). Location of new island records for Hydrophilus insularis. Photo: Berry van der Hoorn.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Figure 17.
Figure 17.

Kevin Beentjes sampling beetles from an overgrown swimming pool at an abandoned construction site near Zeelandia beach, St. Eustatius (8-x-2015). Location of new island record for Thermonectus circumscriptus and Tropisternus lateralis. Photo: Berry van der Hoorn.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

History of beetle collecting in the Dutch Antilles

The list of beetle collectors below offers an overview of beetle collecting and short biographies of those who visited the Dutch islands and collected beetles. Collectors of single specimens are only included in the species listings. The overview also contains information about important collections. Although a considerable number of people have been collecting Coleoptera on the islands, only a small part of these collections has actually been studied or published.

Museum abbreviations

American Museum of Natural History, New York (AMNH); British Museum of Natural History, London (BMNH); C.A. Triplehorn Insect Collection, Ohio (OSUC); Canadian Museum of Nature, Ottawa (CMNC); Canadian National Collection of Insects, Ottawa (CNCI); Centre de Recherche Agronomique Antilles-Guyane, Guadeloupe (INRA-CRAAG); Doncaster Museum and Art Gallery, Doncaster (DMAG); E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum, Alberta (UASM); Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago (FMNH); Florida State Collection of Arthropods (FSCA); Hope Entomological Collections, University Museum of Natural History, Oxford (HEC); Insect Collection of the University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez (EPRL); Musée Cantonal de Zoologie, Lausanne (MZLS); Muséum d’Histoire Naturelle, Geneva (MHNG); Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, Paris (MNHN); Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge (MCZC); National Museum of Natural History, Washington D.C. (USNM); Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Leiden (RMNH); Naturhistorisches Museum Wien (NHMW); Oklahoma Museum of Natural History (OMNH); Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, Brussels (RBINS); Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Müncheberg (SDEI); Snow Entomological Museum Collection, Kansas (SEMC); Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm (NHRS); University of Puerto Rico Mayagüez Invertebrate Collection (UPRM); University of the West Indies Zoology Museum, St. Augustine (UWIC); Uppsala University Museum of Evolution (UUZM); University of Georgia Collection of Arthropods (UGCA); West Indian Beetle Fauna Project, Montana (WIBF); Zoologisches Museum der Humboldt Universität, Berlin (ZMHB); Zoologisk Museum Copenhagen (ZMUC).

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Biographies of collectors

Aellen, Villy & Strinati, Pierre (VA & PS)

Swiss speleologists; conducted a biospeleological expedition in Aruba and Curaçao in 1985 and collected various cave-dwelling arthropods among which were at least two previously undescribed beetle species. Their collections are in MHNG (Rücker 1988, Osella 1989, Aellen & Strinati 1997).

Baranowski, Richard M. & Venn, Helen B. (RMB & HBV)

Professor emeritus at the Department of Entomology & Nematology of the University of Florida. Baranowski is a specialist on Heteroptera, especially those from South Florida and the Antilles. He, accompanied by his wife Helen, visited the Antilles as part of his research on the Lygaeidae of the West Indies (Baranowski & Slater 2005). The Baranowskis also visited Saba in August 1992 where they collected at least one beetle (Ivie et al. 2008a, Shpeley et al. 2017).

Bass, David (DBA)

Professor of biology and curator of invertebrates at the University of Central Oklahoma. Bass visited several Caribbean islands including Saba (in 1999 and 2006) to study aquatic macroinvertebrates. Specimens from these studies have been deposited in OMNH (Bass 2008, 2020).

Behm, Jocelyn E. & Assour, Hannah R. (JEB & HRA) (Fig. 18)

Figure 18.
Figure 18.

Jocelyn E. Behm. Photo: Tyler J. Tran.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Biologist Jocelyn Behm and undergraduate student biology Hannah Assour from the Center for Biodiversity at Temple University, Philadelphia, sampled invertebrates on Curaçao in 2017 and reported the first sighting of Cheilomenes sexmaculata on the island (Assour & Behm 2019).

Bennett, Fred Douglas (FDB)

Entomologist and director of the Commonwealth Institute of Biological Control in Trinidad. In 1985 he left the institute for the University of Florida. Bennett visited several Caribbean islands including Curaçao. Due to a delayed flight Bennett was obliged to overnight on Curaçao in 1984. While there, he collected Microlarinus lypriformis near the airport for the first time for the island (Bennett 1985, 1989, 2020).

Bergh, J.G. van den (JGB)

Teacher on Aruba. Collected all kinds of natural history specimens. Collection in RMNH (Wagenaar Hummelinck 1961, Marcuzzi 1962, Ball & Shpeley 1992).

Bergh, V.H. van den (VHB)

Dutch chemist working for the Curaçaosche Petroleum Industrie Maatschappij. He advised Wagenaar Hummelinck during his first expedition and collected at least one beetle during this expedition (Rutten 1932, Gilmour 1968).

Bitter, B.A. (BAB)

Veterinary officer for the Government of the Netherlands Antilles. Member of the board of the “Vereniging van Bijenhouders op Curaçao” (Society of Bee Keepers on Curaçao) and member of the Natural Sciences Study Group Netherlands Antilles. Collected at least one longhorn beetle on Curaçao (Bitter 1949, Baumhover et al. 1955, Voous 1957, Gilmour 1968).

Boeken, Michiel (MB) (Fig. 19)

Figure 19.
Figure 19.

Boeken emerging with red-tailed tropicbird (Phaethon aethereus) on Saba. Photo: Mardik Leopold.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Dutch biologist who worked as a school director on Saba from August 2010 till July 2012. In his spare time he studied the breeding biology of red-billed tropicbirds (Phaethon aethereus), set up a monitoring programme for the orchid Brassavola cucullata and published an illustrated checklist of the island’s orchid species and a checklist to the birds of Saba. Boeken returned to Saba in 2019–2020 for a follow-up on his red-billed tropicbird study. Boeken also collected beetles which are part of the collection of RMNH. Those collected during his most recent 2019–2020 trip are in the private collection of the first author and as yet unidentified (Boeken 2014, 2018, Boeken in litt. 2019, 2020).

Bonfils, Jacques Henri Philippe (JHPB)

French entomologist who specialised in leafhoppers (Hemiptera); worked for the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (National Institut for Agricultural Research; INRA). Bonfils collected on St. Martin during the 1960s. His collections are currently housed in the INRA-CRAAG in Guadeloupe, part of which has been transferred to INRA-France (Villiers 1980a, Lhoste 1987, Chassain & Touroult 2012, Peck et al. 2014).

Bonnissent, Dominique (DB)

French archaeologist who worked for the Institut National de Recherches Archéologiques Préventives (French National Insititute for Preventive Archaeological Research, INRAP), Lesser Antilles. Marcuzzi (2001) and Soldati & Touroult (2014) listed some Tenebrionidae that were collected by her at the Hope Estate on St. Martin in 1995. The latter are in the private collection of Laurent Soldati (Bonnissent 2020).

Bright, Donald E. & Barr, Barbara A. (DEB & BAB)

Donald Bright is an American coleopterologist and one of the leading world authorities on the classification of Scolytinae. He is currently a faculty affiliate at Colorado State University in Fort Collins. Bright recently published a comprehensive monograph of the bark and ambrosia beetles of the West Indies. In the company of Barbara Barr, he collected beetles on Saba in April 2013 which are housed in CNCI and WIBF (Bright 2019).

Brother M. Realino (BMR) (Fig. 20)

Figure 20.
Figure 20.

From left to right: brother Realino, brother Canutus en brother August on a study trip on St. Martin. Photo: collection Caribisch Erfgoed, Stadsmuseum Tilburg, The Netherlands.

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Born Frederikus Johannes Antonius Janssen he received the monastery name Realino after joining the Congregation of Brothers of Our Lady Mother of Mercy in Tilburg, The Netherlands in 1908. After teaching in Tilburg for nine years he left for Curaçao where he became a teacher for another 43 years. Realino acquired great knowledge of the local flora and fauna. Although he was more of an academic than a field biologist (Wagenaar Hummelinck 1978) he did collect some beetles which are now in RMNH. Marcuzzi (2002) named Diastolinus realinoi after him.

Brzoska, David W. (DWB)

Retired dentist with an M.Sc. in entomology and avid collector of Cicindelinae. His beetles are housed in SEMC and in his private collection. Brzoska collected in Bonaire in 1992 (Brzoska 2020, Thomas 2020).

Bugnion, Edouard Frédéric (EFB) (Fig. 21)

Figure 21.
Figure 21.

Bugnion. Portrait made by his wife Céline Laguarde in 1913.

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Swiss anatomist who, in addition to his work as a professor at the Institute of Anatomy of the Faculty of Medicine in Lausanne, published numerous articles on insects, especially ants and termites. In 1895–1896 he, together with Auguste Forel and Felix Santschi, travelled through Venezuela, Colombia and the Antilles, where Curaçao was visited (Sartori & Cherix 1983). Part of the Coleoptera collected during this trip were published by Fauvel (1901) and Grouvelle & Léveillé (1902, 1903). His collection is now probably housed in MZLS.

Burgers, Anton Cornelius Jacobus (ACJB)

Dutch endocrinologist; made a private collecting trip through the Antilles in the winter of 1948–1949. Like Wagenaar Hummelinck he worked at the Zoological Laboratory in Utrecht. Burgers collected insects in Bonaire, Curaçao, St. Eustatius, Saba and St. Martin (Burgers 1953, Gilmour 1968, Simon Thomas 1984). Collection in RMNH.

Chalumeau, Fortuné (FC) (Fig. 22)

Figure 22.
Figure 22.

Fortuné Chalumeau.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

French entomologist and managing director of the Institute for Entomological Research in the Caribbean (IREC) in Guadeloupe. IREC was founded in 1978 by Fortuné Chalumeau and Jean-Pierre Camenen. The main purpose of the Institute is the systematic, ethological and biogeographical study of entomological taxa in the Caribbean and South America. Chalumeau published extensively on Caribbean beetles and graduated on a thesis on the Scarabaeoidea of the southern Antillean islands Guadeloupe, Dominica and Martinique. He visited St. Martin several times. His scientific collections are in INRA-CRAAG (Chalumeau 1983a, Peck 2016, Chalumeau 2020). His last and main entomological publication is “The Chiasognathinae of the Andes” (Chalumeau & Brochier 2007). Chalumeau is a writer and historian too.

Clarke, John Frederick Gates (JFGC)

American entomologist specialised in Microlepidoptera. His early professional training and experience were in pharmacy but he later switched to zoology and entomology. Clarke collected on 30 Antillean islands among which was St. Martin. He visited the island during the second Bredin-Smithsonian Caribbean Expedition on 11-iv-1958 and 12-iv-1958 (Schmitt 1958, Hodges 1991, Hart & Ivie 2016). Beetles in the collections of USNM and WIBF.

Cobben, René Hubert (RHC) (Fig. 23)

Figure 23.
Figure 23.

Cobben in 1978. Photo by unknown photographer.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Dutch entomologist specialised in Heteroptera; worked at the Laboratory for Entomology in Wageningen, The Netherlands. From September 1956 until July 1957 Cobben made a collection trip to the Dutch Antilles. He published a series of papers about the Heteroptera of the Dutch Antilles based on this expedition. Cobben not only collected bugs but also many beetles. Among these are the types of Elaphidion cobbeni Gilmour, 1963a [currently a synonym of Elaphidion glabratum (Fabricius, 1792a)], Caribbeana hebes Gilmour, 1963a [a synonym of Styloleptus inermis (Fabricius, 1801a)], Leptostyloides turbidus Gilmour, 1963b [a synonym of Amniscus similis (Gahan, 1895)] and Urgleptes cobbeni Gilmour, 1963b (Cobben 1960, de Vrijer 1988). Collection largely in RMNH; Gilmour’s holotypes are in DMAG.

Dalens, Pierre Henry (PHD)

French physician working in French Guyana. Together with Stéphane Brûlé, Eddy Poirier (see there) and Julien Touroult he founded the Société Entomologique Antilles Guyane. Dalens collected on St. Martin in 2008 (Touroult 2019b, Dalens 2020, SEAG 2020).

Danforth, Stuart Taylor (STD)

American professor in zoology and entomology at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez. He travelled extensively throughout the Caribbean region until his untimely passing at the age of 38 (Franz & Yusseff Vanegas 2009). Birds were his prime interest but Danforth also had a passion for entomology and established a sizeable collection of insects particularly strong in Coleoptera. He made a brief trip to St. Eustatius and St. Martin in November–December 1927. In January–February 1937 he travelled to Saba and St. Eustatius (Wetmore 1939, Voous 1955). On both journeys Danforth also collected beetles (see for instance Chalumeau & Gruner 1977, Ball & Shpeley 2009, Shpeley et al. 2017). Parts of his Dutch Antilles collection are in AMNH, EPRL, MCZC, MNHN, UASM and USNM.

Delplanque, André (AD)

French entomologist who worked for the French INRA in Guadeloupe in the 1970s. Delplanque visited St. Martin in 1970. Together with Fortuné Chalumeau he wrote a popular book about the insects of Guadeloupe and the neighbouring islands (Delplanque & Chalumeau 1975, 1985, Chalumeau & Gruner 1977, Skilling & Batzer 1995, Chalumeau & Touroult 2005).

Díaz-Piferrer, Manuel R. (MRDP)

Cuban phycologist and authority on Caribbean undersea botany. Worked at the University of Oriente, Cuba and later at the Department of Marine Sciences of the University of Puerto Rico. Visited the Leeward Antilles several times to study the local algal flora. Collected at least one longhorn beetle on Curaçao [Anonymous 1982, Philips & Ivie 1998 (as M.D. Piterrer)].

Donneuve, C. & P. (CD & PD)

Collectors of the type specimen of “Helops martinensis” (see further there) and specimens of Zophobas atratus at Oyster Pond, St. Martin, all in the private collection of Laurent Soldati.

Ébrard, David (DE)

Listed as a collector of several longhorn beetles on St. Martin and Saba by Chalumeau & Touroult (2005). We have not been able to find any additional information.

Epp, Carolus T. (CTE)

Lived on Curaçao from 1876 till 1886; member of the Curaçao Public Health Council and worked as chemist and meteorologist. Epp collected all kinds of natural history specimens including Coleoptera. After his return to the Netherlands he donated part of his collections to RMNH (Viana 1968, Fransen et al. 1997).

Father Pinchon, Robert (FRP)

Natural science professor at the diocesan college of Fort de France, Martinique. Pinchon was primarily active on Martinique where he collected all kinds of natural history specimens. At least in July 1953 he also visited St. Martin. His collections are in MNHN (Balazuc & Chalumeau 1978, Chalumeau & Gruner 1977).

Flachs, R. (RF)

Deputy director of the Curaçaosche Petroleum Industrie Maatschappij and avid advocate for the establishment of CARMABI on Curaçao. Collected some longhorn beetles on Curaçao among which two female paratypes of Lagocheirus araneiformis curacaoensis Gilmour, 1968 (Anonymous 1955, 1959, Gilmour 1968, Debrot & Bak 2019). Part of the RMNH collection.

Forsström, Johan Erik (JEF)

Swedish pastor on St. Barthélemy from 1803 till 1815; also visited other islands in the region such as Saba and Guadeloupe (Urban 1902). On St. Eustatius Forsström collected a series of beetles new to science: Cryptophagus forsstromii Gyllenhal, 1808a [current taxonomic status unknown; types in UUZM (Wallin 2001) and NHRS (NHRS 2001)], Stelidota strigosa (Gyllenhal, 1808b) [type in NHRS (NHRS 2001)], Nitidula lusca Gyllenhal, 1808c [currently a synonym of Stelidota strigosa; type in NHRS (NHRS 2001)], Hyperaspis connectens (Thunberg, 1808) [type in NHRS (NHRS 2001)], Lachnopus villosipes (Boheman, 1834) [type in NHRS (NHRS 2001)] and Apion pilosum Gyllenhal, 1833 (current status and whereabouts of the type unknown). According to Horn & Kahle (1935) Forsström’s collection of Antillean insects travelled through the hands of G.J. Billberg and J.G. Children to finally end up in the BMNH in London.

Gabriel, Alfons (AG)

Austrian physician who worked on Bonaire from 1922 till 1925 (Wagenaar Hummelinck 1939). Gabriel collected a considerable number of natural history specimens including some Arthropoda. These were later studied by different specialists and published by Werner (1925). This collection is probably in the NHMW.

Gillett, Michael P.T. (MPTG)

English biochemist who works as a professor at the Saba University School of Medicine in The Bottom. Gillett was and is resident on Saba in 2006–2007 and from 2010 to the present. During this time he regularly collected beetles and other insects, partly assisted by Conrad P.D.T. Gillett. His Coleoptera are housed in his private collection and in BMNH (Gillett & Gillett 2015, Gillett 2020).

Heatwole, Harold F. & MacKenzie, Faustino (also written as McKenzie; HFH & FM)

Harold F. Heatwole is an American ecologist who currently works as a professor at the Department of Zoology of North Carolina State University, Raleigh. His research encompasses both invertebrates and vertebrates. MacKenzie worked at the Institute of Neurobiology of the University of Puerto Rico and was Heatwole’s research assistant. MacKenzie recently passed away. Heatwole and MacKenzie visited St. Martin in 1965. Their beetles are housed in WIBF (Heatwole et al. 1981, Hart & Ivie 2016).

Holleman, W.A.J. (WAJH)

Author, wrote a popular school book about nature in the Dutch Antilles (Holleman 1952). Collected some beetles on Curaçao (Voous 1952, Gilmour 1968). These are in RMNH.

Ivie, Michael A. (MAI) (Fig. 24)

Figure 24.
Figure 24.

Ivie with Dynastes hercules on Dominica, June 2011. Photo: Donna Ivie.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Associate Professor and Curator of Entomology in the Department of Plant Science and Plant Pathology at Montana State University which among other collections holds the important West Indian Beetle Fauna Project Collection. Ivie leads the West Indian Beetle Fauna Project at Montana State University, in cooperation with coleopterists world-wide. The project started in the late 1970s and continues. Ivie has visited all the northern Dutch Antilles although Saba was most extensively sampled. Along with Derek S. Sikes (see there), David Wagner and Piotr Nastrecki, Ivie visited Saba from 18 to 26 May 2008. Collections were made throughout the island using a variety of traps and added to those collected by Sikes and Jozef A. Slowik (see there) in March of that year, as well as material from traps running March to May. The beetles from these efforts, added to specimens collected by Borys Malkin 11–15 January 1968, and by Richard and Niki Miller’s brief visit in March 1986, resulted in a list of nearly 300 species of beetles represented by over 3,200 specimens. Since that time, more material has been added from the collecting by Gillett and Bright. Specimens of other orders have not been studied, but are of a smaller extent. Ivie visited St. Eustatius on 27 and 28 May 2008, making small collections (est. 35 beetle species). Brief visits over the years to St. Maarten/St. Martin and donations from collaborators have resulted in very limited holdings from that island. Ivie has published extensively on Caribbean beetles and the material from his work has been included in many other works (Maier & Ivie 2013, Peck & Cook 2014, Hart & Ivie 2016, Shpeley et al. 2017, Bright 2019, Ivie in litt. 2020).

Jesse, Wendy A.M. et al. (WAMJ)

In 2016 Wendy Jesse, PhD biology student of the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, and colleagues studied the effects of the Coralita Antigonon leptopus invasion and urban development on the arthropod community composition on St. Eustatius. A small number of Coleoptera morphospecies were collected. These beetles are stored in the Caribbean Netherlands Science Institute on St. Eustatius (Jesse et al. 2020, Jesse in litt. 2020).

Jong, B. de (BJ)

Dutch biologist and longtime resident of Curaçao. There are Coleoptera in Dutch collections made by him from 1951 up to 1963, mainly from Curaçao but also from Aruba. De Jong was secretary of the Natural Science Study Group of the Netherlands Antilles on Curaçao (van Heekeren 1960, McCrone & Levi 1964). He did not only send material to the then Zoological Museum of Amsterdam but also directly to Gilmour (1968). The former Amsterdam specimens are now in RMNH, those sent to Gilmour in DMAG.

Krift, R. van der (RK)

Collected beetles for Dré Teunissen while stationed at the marine base Suffisant at Curaçao in 1983. Dré Teunissen donated these beetles to the first author.

Lalanne-Cassou, Bernard (BLC)

Retired French lepidopterologist who works for the French INRA and the MNHN. Lalanne-Cassou lived on Guadeloupe for six years and visited St. Martin in 1983. He collected beetles on several Antillean islands (Zagatti et al. 1995–2006, Ivie et al. 2008a, Mantilleri 2014, Shpeley et al. 2017, Lalanne-Cassou 2020).

Mac Gillavry, Henry James (HJMG)

Henry James Mac Gillavry was the son of the Dutch brain surgeon and entomologist Donald Mac Gillavry. He joined Wagenaar Hummelinck on his first journey to the Antilles during a geological expedition to Aruba, Bonaire and Curaçao (Rutten 1932). Wagenaar Hummelinck paid special attention to the fauna of fresh and salt inland waters and the marine littoral area. Besides being a geology student, Henry James Mac Gillavry also had a keen interest in biology and added to Wagenaar Hummelinck’s work by collecting land insects (Geijskes & Wagenaar Hummelinck 1951, Skelton et al. 2013). Mac Gillavry (1934) also published a short paper about the insects of Curaçao. Collection in the RMNH.

Maldonado Capriles, Jenaro (JMC)

Puerto Rico-born entomologist and world authority on Miridae and Reduviidae (Heteroptera). Maldonado Capriles also studied Cicadellidae (Hemiptera) and Coleoptera (Scarabaeidae and Lymexylonidae). Blake (1965) named the Antillean chrysomelid beetle Syphrea maldonadoi after him. As far as the Dutch Antilles are concerned Maldonado collected beetles in Aruba, Bonaire and Curaçao in July 1962. His collection is in USNM (Kingsolver 1969, Santiago-Blay et al. 1997, Romero & Johnson 2000).

Malkin, Borys (BM) (Fig. 25)

Figure 25.
Figure 25.

Malkin ca. 1975. Photo: Helena Malkin.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Belarus-born Polish–American ethnologist, naturalist, collector, traveller, photographer and filmmaker. Malkin collected beetles in the Philippines, New Guinea, Australia, Europe, Africa and America including the Antilles. Malkin collected for many musea. A large part of his collection of insects, including some of the Dutch Antilles, is kept at FMNH [Ivie et al. 2009, Bousquet 2012, Symbiota Collections of Arthropods Network (SCAN 2020)].

Marshall, Stephen A. (SAM)

Canadian professor of entomology and director of the University of Guelph Insect Collection. Marshall paid a short visit to St. Martin in 1978. The beetles collected during this trip are in CMNC (Mantilleri 2014, Marshall in litt. 2018, Marshall 2020).

Mekkes, Jan-Joost (JJM) (Fig. 26)

Figure 26.
Figure 26.

Jan-Joost Mekkes on the Quill, St. Eustatius. Photo: Jan-Joost Mekkes.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Dutch entomologist specialising in Lepidoptera, Odonata and Orthoptera. Mekkes visited St. Eustatius for nearly two months in 2020. On his way to the island he also paid a week-long visit to St. Maarten. Mekkes collected invertebrates, including beetles, on both islands. His Coleoptera are currently in the possession of the first author but will eventually become part of the RMNH collection.

Miller, Richard S. & Niki J. (RSM)

Visited Saba, and on their way also St. Martin, in March 1986. Their efforts yielded 32 species of beetles from Saba and at least one from St. Martin. Their collections were largely donated to WIBF. Their Tenebrionidae are in OSUC (Ivie et al. 2009, Hart & Ivie 2016, SCAN 2020).

Molengraaff, Gerard Johan Hendrik (GJHM)

Dutch mining engineer who worked and lived on Curaçao from 1921 till 1927. Molengraaff studied fossils and also collected some beetles (Molengraaff 1929, Wagenaar Hummelinck 1955, Gilmour 1968). These are housed in RMNH.

Neervoort van de Poll, Jacobus Rudolphus Hendrik (NVDP) (Fig. 27)

Figure 27.
Figure 27.

Neervoort van de Poll. Coin issued to commemorate the marriage of Jacobus Rudolph Hendrik Neervoort van de Poll with Marthe Jeannette Elsine Geertruijda Phillippine Zubli, 20-v-1887. Collection Tylers Museum, Haarlem, The Netherlands.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Dutch entomologist, primarily interested in Coleoptera. At the end of 1884 he joined the geologist K. Martin and the botanist W.F.R. Suringar on a trip to Suriname and the Netherlands Antilles. From 9 January to 26 February 1885 the group visited Aruba (28 January–10 February), Bonaire (18–23 February) and Curaçao (9–28 January, 11–18 and 23–26 February). His collection was sold through O.E. Janson (London) often separately by family. Neervoort van de Poll described Tetracha curacaoica [currently a synonym of Megacephala gracilis (Dejean, 1825)] in his paper about the Cicindelinae of Curaçao (Martin 1885, 1888, Suringar 1885, 1886, Neervoort van de Poll 1886, Horn & Kahle 1935, Fransen et al. 1997).

Pieters Kwiers, Edwin Simon (ESPK)

Antillean-born; studied tropical agriculture at the Wageningen University. Pieters Kwiers worked for the local Agricultural Services, assisted several zoologists on Bonaire and Curaçao and also collected himself (Cobben 1960, Gilmour 1968, Stock 1977). His beetles are in the RMNH collection.

Poirier, Eddy (EP)

French entomologist. Together with Stéphane Brûlé, Pierre Henry Dalens and Julien Touroult he founded the Société Entomologique Antilles Guyane. Poirier collected on St. Martin in 2015 (Lemaire 2017, SEAG 2020).

Rijgersma, Hendrik Elingsz van (HER) (Fig. 28)

Figure 28.
Figure 28.

Van Rijgersma at the age of 38.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Dutch physician who worked for the government on St. Martin from 1863 until his death on 4 March 1877 at the age of 42. His prime interest concerned Mollusca but Rijgersma collected all kinds of natural history specimens including beetles. Rijgersma also exchanged material with others among which was Abbé Kohlmann, a French catholic priest and entomologist specialising in Coleoptera who lived on both Guadeloupe and St. Martin (1867–1875). Rijgersma’s collecting activities were not restricted to St. Martin. He also visited Anguilla, Saba, St. Eustatius and Redonda. His beetles are in RMNH and, except for some individual specimens, have not been revised (Holthuis 1959, 1961, Coomans 1974, Ehn & Zanoni 2002). Coomans’ paper offers a comprehensive review of Rijgersma’s life and work.

Ringma, Ab D. (ADR)

Dutch pilot who worked at Hato airport, Curaçao. During the late 1940s until his departure to the Netherlands in 1951 he studied the caves of Curaçao, Aruba and Bonaire (Wagenaar Hummelinck 1951). Ringma also collected beetles which are in RMNH.

Rolander, Daniel (DR) (Fig. 29)

Figure 29.
Figure 29.

Daniel Rolander, detail of a painting by William Parry 1775 of Rolander and Joseph Banks and the Tahitian visitor Omai. Photo: Bengt Oberger.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

One of the apostles of Linnaeus and the first to visit St. Eustatius to collect beetles; arrived by ship from Suriname on 12 February 1756 and left the island on 23 February 1756. During this short visit Rolander collected, among others, Dermestes eustatius Linnaeus, 1758, a taxon which according to Háva (2015) is not a dermestid beetle but a scolytine. The type is in de Charles de Geer collection in NHRS (Dobreff et al. 2009, Dobreff 2010) but its current taxonomic status is unclear.

Sallé, Auguste (AS)

French collector who, together with his mother and a friend of hers, regularly explored Mexico, the Antilles and South America. Sallé’s expeditions were financed by a group of investors, chiefly Louis Alexandre Auguste Chevrolat, who shared the collected insects among the shareholders. Sallé’s private collection was especially rich in species from Mexico, the Dominican Republic, Venezuela and the United States. It was sold at an auction by Émile Deyrolle in 1897. Most of his collection eventually ended up in the MNHN in Paris via entomologists like Fleutiaux, Grouvelle, Oberthür, Sédillot and Théry (Cambefort 2006). Among the Dutch Antilles, at least Curaçao was visited by Sallé. Mulsant & Rey (1859) described Goajiria curta based on specimens collected on Curaçao by Sallé.

Sande, J.C.P.M. van de (CvdS)

Dutch biologist with an interest in botany, beetles and aquatic macrofauna. Stayed at CARMABI in Curaçao during his study time from December 1975 till May 1976. His Coleoptera are in his private collection.

Sikes, Derek S. (DSS)

Curator of insects and professor of entomology at the University of Alaska Museum. World authority on Nicrophorinae, a subfamily of the Silphidae, a beetle family not represented in the Lesser Antilles. Along with Jozef A. Slowik (see there), Sikes visited Saba in March 2008 to collect invertebrates and set up traps. Both returned to the island in June of that year in the company of David Wagner, Piotr Nastrecki and Michael Ivie (see there) to pick up the traps and collect more invertebrates. About 3,000 beetle specimens were collected during these visits (Maier & Ivie 2013, Peck & Cook 2014, Hart & Ivie 2016, Shpeley et al. 2017, Bright 2019, Ivie in litt. 2020, Sikes 2020b).

Simmonds, Frederick J. (FJS)

Director of the West Indian Station of the Commonwealth Institute of Biological Control; visited at least some of the Dutch Antilles in May 1954 during the course of a number of different Caribbean biological control projects and collected Coccinellidae and Bruchidae. The specimens reported upon by Bennett & Simmonds (1964) are in BMNH, USNM and UWIC (Davey 1958, Gordon 1972, Gordon & Chapin 1983).

Slowik, Jozef A. (JAS)

Insect collection research affiliate at the University of Alaska Museum. Slowik’s focus is on spider taxonomy, life history, faunistics, and phylogeny, specifically that of the spider families Linyphiidae and Lycosidae. Along with Derek Sikes (see there) Joey Slowik visited Saba in March 2008 to collect invertebrates and set up traps. Both returned to the island in June of that year in the company of David Wagner, Piotr Nastrecki and Michael Ivie (see there) to pick up the traps and collect more invertebrates. About 3,000 beetle specimens were collected during these visits. Together with Derek Sikes, Slowik published an overview of the spider fauna of Saba (Slowik & Sikes 2011, Maier & Ivie 2013, Peck & Cook 2014, Hart & Ivie 2016, Shpeley et al. 2017, Bright 2019, Ivie in litt. 2020).

St. Eustatius Scientific Terrestrial Expedition team (Fig. 30)

Figure 30.
Figure 30.

View from Boven National Park, St. Eustatius. From foreground to background: Zeelandia, airstrip, Oranjestad, the Quill. Photo: Berry van der Hoorn.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Rens Vogel and Thijs van den Burg (students; RV, THB), mammalogists of the Dutch Mammal Society (Ellen van Norren, Sil Westra and Wesley Overman; VZZ), Jeroen van der Brugge (natural history educator; JB), John Smit (dipterologist; JTS), Kevin Beentjes (molecular biologist; KB), Ton de Winter (malacologist; AJW), Marijke Kanters (nature photographer; MK), Hannah Madden (STENAPA; HM), Ambrosius van Zanten (STENAPA; AZ) and the first author (coleopterologist; EOC) collected beetles during the St. Eustatius Scientific Terrestrial Expedition outside the plots. These specimens are partly housed in the author’s private collection and partly in RMNH.

Steen, Louise J. van der (LJS)

Secretary at the CARMABI institute and later in the Zoological Laboratory Utrecht. From 1958 on she co-edited the “Studies on the Fauna of Curaçao and other Caribbean Islands” together with P. Wagenaar Hummelinck. Van der Steen was also one of the editors of the journal “Nieuwe West-Indische Gids”. A number of beetles collected by her in the CARMABI area on Curaçao are in the collection of RMNH (Gilmour 1968, Wagenaar Hummelinck 1968, 1982).

Steiner, Warren E. & Swearingen, Jil M. (WES & JMS)

Visited Curaçao in February 1987 and collected among other specimens the types of Cybocephalus caribaeus Smith, 2007 and the paratypes of Nephaspis bootes Gordon, 1997. Until his retirement in 2010, Steiner was responsible for the management of the Coleoptera collection of the USNM where his collections are also largely stored. Steiner also visited Curaçao in 2014 in the company of M.C. Thomas and R.H. Turnbow (Gordon 1997, Philips & Ivie 1998, Smith & Cave, 2007, Grey & Smith 2020, Steiner 2020).

Stock, Jan H. (JHS)

Dutch carcinologist and professor of zoology at the University of Amsterdam. Collected at least one longhorn beetle on Curaçao (Gilmour 1968, Anonymous 1997).

Turnbow, Robert H. Jr. (RHT) & Thomas, Michael C. (MCT)

Robert Turnbow is an American entomologist working at Fort Tucker, Alabama. Michael Thomas is emeritus entomologist Coleoptera at FSCA. Both visited Curaçao in 2014 and 2015. Their Curaçao beetles are in Turnbow’s private collection, FSCA and UGCA. Neorthopleura turnbowi from Curaçao and N. thomasi from the Cayman Islands and the Bahamas were recently named after them (Opitz 2019, Grey & Smith 2020, UGCA 2020).

Wagenaar Hummelinck, Pieter (PWH) (Fig. 31)

Figure 31.
Figure 31.

Wagenaar Hummelinck nearly one week after his retirement in January 1972. Photo: Jac. P. Stolp, University Museum, Utrecht.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Probably the most active historic collector in the Antilles. Wagenaar Hummelinck worked at the Zoological Laboratory Utrecht and collected in all the Dutch Antilles as well as Venezuela, Columbia, Suriname and numerous other islands in the Caribbean. Altogether he made nine, often extended, trips to the area. Wagenaar Hummelinck published a comprehensive catalogue of all his collection sites (Wagenaar Hummelinck 1981). His interests covered a wide field including zoology, archaeology and geology. As far as beetles are concerned, he studied the Caribbean tiger beetles (Wagenaar Hummelinck 1955, 1983).

Among his many other activities, Wagenaar Hummelinck was involved in the foundation of the “Natuurwetenschappelijke Studiekring voor Suriname en de Nederlandse Antillen” (Foundation for Scientific Research in Surinam and the Netherlands Antilles), the “Natuurwetenschappelijke Werkgroep Nederlandse Antillen” (Natural Science Study Group of the Netherlands Antilles) and the “Caraïbisch Marien-Biologisch Instituut” (Caribbean Marine Biological Institute; CARMABI). From 1953 until 1988 he was also (managing) editor of “Studies on the Fauna of Curaçao and other Caribbean Islands” and between 1946 and 1986 of currently one of the longest running scholarly journals on the Caribbean: “(Nieuwe) West-Indische Gids” [(New) West-Indian Guide] (van der Steen 1988, Debrot & Bak 2019).

In their review of entomological research in the Netherlands Antilles Geijskes & Wagenaar Hummelinck (1951) stated that “… all the material is at the Amsterdam and Leiden Musea and the results will, in due course, be published in Studies on the fauna of Curaçao….”. However, at present still only a very small part of his extensive collection (now largely in the RMNH), has been studied. Parts of his beetles are also housed in AMNH, BMNH, DMAG, HEC, RBINS, SDEI, USNM, UWIC, ZMHB, ZMUC, Michael Ivie’s private collection and probably others.

Winkelman, Jaap K. (JKW) (Fig. 32)

Figure 32.
Figure 32.

Jaap Winkelman. Photo: Gert van Ee.

Citation: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie 162, 2-3 (2019) ; 10.1163/22119434-bja10006

Dutch biology teacher and Chrysomelinae expert. Winkelman visited Bonaire in July 2017. He did not collect any Chrysomelinae. Bonairean Chrysomelidae of other subfamilies were identified by, and deposited in the private collection of Ron Beenen. Beetles from other families were identified by, and are in the private collection of, the first author.

Ypenburg, van (Y)

Listed as a collector of longhorn beetles on Curaçao by Gilmour (1968). We have not been able to find any additional information. Part of the collection of RMNH.

Zijl, J. van (JZ)

Member of the Natural Sciences Study Group Netherlands Antilles. Collected all kinds of natural history specimens in Aruba during the second half of the 1940s. Collection in RMNH (Wagenaar Hummelinck 1951, Gilmour 1968).

Systematic catalogue of the Coleoptera of the Dutch Antilles

Order COLEOPTERA Linnaeus, 1758: 345

Suborder ADEPHAGA Clairville, 1806: 2

Family CARABIDAE Latreille, 1802: 80

Subfamily CARABINAE Latreille, 1802: 80

Calosoma alternans (Fabricius, 1792b): 146

[Aruba]

Photo sent by Gerard van Buurt

Curaçao

Calosoma granulatum: Breuning 1927: 196 – “Brasilien: Curaçao” (without further data)

St. Martin

Calosoma alternans: Lemaire 2017: 55 – Grande Anse, EP

Breuning (1927) listed a specimen in the collection of the Zoologische Museum Hamburg from “Brasilien: Curaçao”. A place called Curaçao in Brazil could not been found in any gazetteer and is here considered a typographic error. A widespread species which is also present on the northern coast of Venezuela and the island Isla Margarita (Gidaspow 1963), areas that both lie near Curaçao. Gerard van Buurt recently sent a photo of this species taken by Facundo Franken on Aruba.

Leng & Mutchler (1917), followed by Blackwelder (1944a: 20), listed this species for Barbuda based on a record in the West Indian Bulletin (probably Ballou 1912: 457). Without clarification it was not listed by Peck (2011, 2016) although he did so earlier in his Barbados checklist (Peck 2009a). The record in Leng & Mutchler (1917) was probably erroneous because Ballou recorded this species from Bermuda (and not Barbuda) and St. Vincent.

Subfamily CICINDELINAE Latreille, 1802: 77

Brasiella argentata (Fabricius, 1801b): 242

Curaçao

Cicindela argentata: Wagenaar Hummelinck 1983: 85 – Emmastad, RHC; Rio Canario, BJ

Wagenaar Hummelinck (1983) wrote that the specimens from Curaçao resemble the subspecies Cicindela argentata pallipes Fleutiaux & Sallé, 1890: 359.

Cicindela trifasciata Fabricius, 1781: 286

St. Martin

Cicindela trifasciata: Horn 1926: 305 – without further data

Cicindela trifasciata: Jonge Poerink 1953: 129 – no locality, JEF; shore of Great Bay, E of Philipsburg, PWH; Atwell’s Pond, PWH; Saline de Grande Case, PWH; E. shore of Great Saltpond, PWH

Cicindelidia trifasciata: Balazuc & Chalumeau 1978: 20 – Baie de Friar, FC; Quartier d’Orléans, FC

Cicindela trifasciata: Wagenaar Hummelinck 1983: 74 – Simpson Bay flat, PWH; Atwell’s Pond, PWH; Lowlands, RHC; Great Bay, PWH; Great Saltpond NE, PWH; Oyster Pond, PWH; Flamingo Pond, PWH; Baie aux Cailles, PWH; Saline de Grand Case, PWH

Cicindela (Cicindelidia) trifasciata: Freitag 1992: 155 – Atwell’s Pond no leg.; Great Saltpond no leg.

Wagenaar Hummelinck (1983) listed a specimen from St. Kitts, an island not listed in Peck (2011, 2016).

Cylindera suturalis (Fabricius, 1798): 62

Curaçao

Cicindela suturalis hebraea: Wagenaar Hummelinck 1983: 79 – Emmastad, RHC; golf links, RHC

St. Martin

Cicindela suturalis: Horn 1926: 305 – without further data

Cicindela suturalis: Jonge Poerink 1953: 133 – no locality data, HER

Habroscelimorpha auraria (Klug, 1834a): 27

Aruba

Cicindela auraria: Jonge Poerink 1953: 122 – Saltpan W of Oranjestad, HJMG; Tibushi, PWH; Salinja Master, W of Savaneta, PWH; Salinja San Jose, N of Palm Beach, PWH

Cicindela auraria: Wagenaar Hummelinck 1983: 71 – Spaans Lagoen, RHC; Salinja Balashi near Spaans Lagoen, PWH

Cicindela (Habroscelimorpha) auraria: Freitag 1992: 156 – without further data

Bonaire

Cicindela auraria: Jonge Poerink 1953: 122 – Klein Bonaire, N. shore of Salinja, PWH; Salinja Plenchi, PWH; Blauwe Pan, ACJB

Cicindela auraria: Wagenaar Hummelinck 1983: 71 – Lagoen, PWH; Blauwe Pan, PWH; Klein Bonaire, Salinja Abau, PWH; Salinja Martinus, PWH; Awa Lodo di Lac, PWH; Salinja di Cai, PWH; Witte Pan, PWH; Isla di Pedro, Lac, PWH; Casdi Meeuchi, Lac, PWH

Cicindela (Habroscelimorpha) auraria: Freitag 1992: 156 – Saint Marinus, no leg.

Curaçao

Cicindela auraria: Neervoort van de Poll 1886: 227 – Plantation Hermanus, NVDP

Cicindela auraria: Horn 1926: 304 – without further data

Cicindela auraria: Jonge Poerink 1953: 122 – Hotel Piscadera Baai, PWH; Salinja Groot Santa Marta, PWH; Otrabanda, Willemstad, BJ

Cicindela auraria: Wagenaar Hummelinck 1983: 71 – Salinja St. Martha, PWH; St. Jorisbaai, PWH; Salinja St. Kruis, PWH

Tetracha gracilis (Reiche, 1842): 240

Aruba

Tetracha (Neotetracha) gracilis: Naviaux 2007: 134 – without further data

Curaçao

Tetracha curacaoica: Neervoort van de Poll 1886: 225 – Plantation Brievengat, NVDP

Megacephala affinis gracilis: Horn 1926: 76 – without further data

Megacephala (Tetracha) affinis gracilis: Wagenaar Hummelinck 1955: 95 – Plantation Brievengat, NVDP; Hato, PWH

Tetracha (Neotetracha) gracilis curacaoica: Naviaux 2007: 134 – Brievengat, NVDP

Tetracha sobrina (Dejean, 1831): 202

Aruba

Megacephala sobrina forma bonaireana: Wagenaar Hummelinck, 1955: 110 – Savaneta, BJ

Megacephala sobrina forma bonaireana: Wagenaar Hummelinck 1983: 109 – Salinja Master, PWH; Rooi Bringamosa, PWH

Tetracha sobrina: Naviaux 2007: 50 – without further data

Bonaire

Tetracha sobrina: Werner 1925: 555 – no locality, AG

Megacephala sobrina forma bonaireana: Wagenaar Hummelinck, 1955: 110 – Salinja Tarn, PWH; Kralendijk, PWH; Deenterra, Tanki George, PWH; Klein Bonaire, Salinja, PWH; Goto, PWH; Cay, PWH; Salinja Martinus, PWH

Megacephala sobrina forma bonaireana: Wagenaar Hummelinck 1983: 109 – Pos Frances, PWH; Goto, RHC; Klein Bonaire, Pos Calbas, PWH; Dos Pos, PWH; Kralendijk, PWH

Tetracha sobrina sobrina: Naviaux 2007: 50 – without further data

Curaçao

Tetracha sobrina: Neervoort van de Poll 1886: 226 – Gouverneur Hotel, Willemstad, Madame van den Brandhof

Tetracha sobrina: Horn 1925: 133 – same as above

Megacephala sobrina confusa: Horn 1926: 75 – without further data

Megacephala sobrina sobrina forma bonaireana: Wagenaar Hummelinck, 1955: 110 – Plantersrust, GJHM; Groot St. Joris, PWH; Groot St. Martha, PWH; SE of Pos Grandi, PWH; Plaja Djerimi, BJ

Megacephala sobrina sobrina forma bonaireana: Wagenaar Hummelinck 1983: 109 – Boca Labadera, PWH

Tetracha sobrina sobrina: Naviaux 2007: 50 – without further data

St. Martin

Megacephala sobrina infuscata: Horn 1926: 75 – without further data

Megacephala sobrina sobrina forma antiguana: Wagenaar Hummelinck 1955: 108 – “S. Mt. Rma”, ex coll. Horn; Great Saltpond, PWH

Megacephala (Tetracha) sobrina race infuscata: Balazuc & Chalumeau 1978: 18 – Tintamarre, P. Pinchon; Baie de Friar, FC; Quartier d’Orléans, FC

Megacephala sobrina sobrina forma antiguana: Wagenaar Hummelinck 1983: 109 – Point Blanche, PWH; Great Saltpond, PWH; Oyster Pond, PWH; Cul-de-Sac, FC

Wagenaar Hummelinck (1983) listed a specimen from St. Kitts, an island not listed in Peck (2011, 2016).

Subfamily SCARITINAE Bonelli, 1810: Tabula synoptica

Paraclivina fasciata (Putzeys, 1846a): 106

Saba

Clivina (Paraclivina) fasciata: Peck 2016: 36 – without further data

Peck (2016) listed the page number of the original description as 624. This is the page number of the paper in the Mémoires de la Société Royale des Sciences de Liége (Putzeys 1846b). Bousquet (2012, 2016) presented evidence that, although listed as a reprint, the separate publication was published earlier.

Paraclivina tristis (Putzeys, 1846a): 102

Bonaire

Clivina (Paraclivina) tristis: Nichols 1988: 94 – Dos Poos, no leg.

Curaçao

Clivina (Paraclivina) tristis: Nichols 1988: 94 – without further data

Peck (2016) listed the page number of the original description as 620. This is the page number of the paper in the Mémoires de la Société Royale des Sciences de Liége (Putzeys 1846b). Bousquet (2012, 2016) presented evidence that, although listed as a reprint, the separate publication was published earlier.

Subfamily HARPALINAE Bonelli, 1810: Tabula synoptica

Apenes variegata (Dejean, 1825): 217

St. Eustatius

Apenes variegata: Ball & Shpeley 2009: 104 – no locality, STD

Apenes pallipes: UPRM 2020: GBIF – no locality, STD

St. Martin

Apenes variegata: Ball & Shpeley 2009: 104 – Grand Case, no leg.

Athrostictus paganus (Dejean, 1831): 834

St. Eustatius

Athrostictus paganus: Shpeley et al. 2017: 24 – no locality, STD

Athrostictus paganus: UPRM 2020: GBIF – no locality, STD

Athrostictus paganus: This study – Boven National Park, AJW

St. Martin

Athrostictus paganus: Shpeley et al. 2017: 24 – Great Bay, STD; Marigot, FC

Peck (2016) listed this species twice in two genera with different ranges: Athrostictus paganus and Selenophorus paganus. The range of this species in the Antilles should be Antigua, Barbados, Barbuda, Canouan, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Martinique, Mayreau, Montserrat, Mustique, Nevis, St. Croix, St. Eustatius, St. Kitts, St. Lucia, St. Martin, St. Vincent, Tobago and Union (Peck 2016, Shpeley et al. 2017, UPRM 2020).

Eucheila boyeri (Solier, 1835a): 111

Aruba

Eucheila (Inna) boyeri: Shpeley & Ball 2000: 162 – no locality, PWH

Galerita americana (Linnaeus, 1758 ): 415

St. Martin

Galerita americana: Reichardt 1967: 63 – without further data

Neoaulacoryssus cupripennis (Gory, 1833): 239

Dutch Antilles

Neoaulacoryssus cupripennis: Ball 1992: 85 – windward Antilles

Neoaulacoryssus cupripennis: Shpeley et al. 2017: 18 – Dutch Antilles

Aruba

Neoaulacoryssus cupripennis: This study – Station 270 [= top Jamanota], PWH

Ball (1992) and Shpeley et al. (2017) did not mention a specific island in the Dutch Antilles but the collection of RMNH holds a specimen from Aruba which was part of a loan to Ball and Shpeley.

Pentagonica flavipes (LeConte, 1853a): 377

Saba

Pentagonica flavipes: Peck 2016: 40 – without further data

St. Eustatius

Pentagonica flavipes: This study – The Quill, EOC, MK & AJW; crater rim The Quill, EOC, MK & AJW

New species record for St. Eustatius. Sieved from leaf litter.

Selenophorus alternans Dejean, 1829: 86

Saba

Selenophorus alternans: Shpeley et al. 2017:176 – Mountain Road, MPTG

Shpeley et al. (2017: 175) added Anguilla, Nevis and Redonda to the range as published by Peck (2011, 2016).

Selenophorus discopunctatus Dejean, 1829: 92

Saba

Selenophorus discopunctatus: Shpeley et al. 2017: 150 – Spring Bay Trail, DSS; The Bottom, MPTG

St. Eustatius

Selenophorus discopunctatus: Shpeley et al. 2017: 150 – no locality, STD; Oranjestad, PWH

Selenophorus discopunctatus: UPRM 2020: GBIF – Oranjestad, STD

Selenophorus discopunctatus: This study – Boven National Park, AJW

St. Martin

Selenophorus discopunctatus: Shpeley et al. 2017: 150 – Great Bay, STD; Baie de Friar, FC; Marigot, FC; Galion, FC

Shpeley et al. (2017: 148, 150) added Anguilla, Barbuda and Redonda to the range as published by Peck (2011, 2016).

Selenophorus flavilabris Dejean, 1829: 79

St. Martin

Selenophorus flavilabris: Shpeley et al. 2017: 164 – Simpson’s Bay STD; Old Battery Hill, E of Great Bay, PWH; Cul de sac, FC; Pic Paradis, FC

Dejean (1829) recorded the type locality as “île Saint -Barthélémy” but Peck (2011) did not list the species. Peck (2016) recorded it from Bahamas, Puerto Rico and “unspecified Leeward Islands”. Shpeley et al. (2017: 85–86), although listing the type locality as “Saint Barthélemy, Leeward Islands, Lesser Antilles” recorded the geographical distribution of the nominal subspecies as “only from Puerto Rico and the two Lesser Antillean islands of Anguilla and St. Martin”. Saint-Barthélemy should be added to the range.

Selenophorus integer ( Fabricius, 1801b): 196

Saba

Selenophorus integer: Shpeley et al. 2017: 168 – Windward Side, RSM; Mountain Road, MPTG; St. John’s, MB

St. Eustatius

Selenophorus integer: Shpeley et al. 2017: 168 – Oranjestad, PWH

Selenophorus integer: This study – Oranjestad, AJW

St. Martin

Selenophorus integer: Shpeley et al. 2017: 168 – Simpson’s Bay, STD; Great Bay, STD; St. Peter, Cul-de-Sac, PWH

Shpeley et al. (2017: 167) added Anguilla and Barbuda to the range as published by Peck (2011, 2016).

Selenophorus parumpunctatus Dejean, 1829: 104

Saba

Selenophorus parumpunctatus: Peck 2016: 40 – without further data

Selenophorus parumpunctatus: Shpeley et al. 2017:186 – Windwardside, RSM; Windwardside, RMB & HBV; Spring Bay Trail, DSS; Cove Bay, Tide Pools Trail, MAI; Mountain Road, MPTG; Bottom, MPTG

St. Eustatius

Selenophorus parumpunctatus: Shpeley et al. 2017:186 – Venus Bay, MAI & N. Esteban

St. Martin

Selenophorus parumpunctatus: Shpeley et al. 2017:186 – Pt. Blanche Bay, PWH; N of Pt. Blancha, PWH; Baie de Friar, FC; Cul de sac, FC; Pic Paradis, FC

Carabus sinuatus Gyllenhal, 1806: 203 is a primary junior homonym of Carabus sinuatus Gmelin, 1790 and synonymous with Selenophorus parumpunctatus (Bousquet 2012). Although the types of sinuatus were reported to come from “America Insulis” by Gyllenhal, Dejean (1829: 106) noted that Schönherr sent specimens to him as originating from St. Barthélemy, an island not listed in Peck (2011, 2016). Bousquet (2012) stated that the whereabouts of the types are unknown and that they are probably in UUZM. Bousquet proves to be right. The four syntypes are listed in GBIF (Telenius & Shah 2016). Shpeley et al. (2017: 185) further added Anguilla, St. Kitts, Nevis and Barbuda to the range as published by Peck (2011, 2016).

Selenophorus propinquus Putzeys, 1874: 118

Saba

Selenophorus propinquus: Shpeley et al. 2017: 173 – Dancing Place Trail, MAI; Dancing Place Trailhead, JAS

St. Eustatius

Selenophorus propinquus: This study – Boven National Park, EOC, MK & AJW

St. Martin

Selenophorus propinquus: Shpeley et al. 2017: 173 – Pic Paradis, FC

New species record for St. Eustatius. A single female sieved from leaf litter. Shpeley et al. (2017: 172) added Anguilla and St. Barthélemy to the range as published by Peck (2011, 2016).

Selenophorus subquadratus Putzeys, 1878: 293

Saba

Selenophorus subquadratus: Shpeley et al. 2017: 155 – Mountain Road, MPTG

Shpeley et al. (2017: 155) added St. Barthélemy and St. Kitts to the range as published by Peck (2011, 2016).

Selenophorus woodruffi Ball & Shpeley, 1992: 96

Aruba

Selenophorus woodruffi: Ball & Shpeley, 1992: 96 – San Nicolaas, JGB

Curaçao

Selenophorus woodruffi: Ball & Shpeley, 1992: 96 – Cas Cora, PWH; Agricultural Station, PWH; Jongbloed, BJ

Stenomorphus angustatus Dejean, 1831: 696

Curaçao

Stenomorphus angustatus angustatus: Ball et al. 1991: 954 – Mahaai, no leg.; Jongbloed, no leg.

Family GYRINIDAE Latreille, 1810: 168

Subfamily GYRININAE Latreille, 1810: 168

Dineutus americanus (Linnaeus, 1767): 568

Curaçao

Dineutus (Cyclinus) americanus: Ochs 1963: 124 – Piscadera Baai, RHC; Santa Martha, RHC

For usage of Dineutus MacLeay, 1825 rather than Dineutes, see Gustafson and Miller (2013).

Gyrinus ovatus Aubé, 1838: 708

Curaçao

Gyrinus (Neogyrinus) racenisi: Ochs 1963: 123 – Piscadera Baai, RHC; Santa Martha, RHC

Gustafson & Short (2017) recently synonymised Gyrinus racenisi with G. ovatus.

Family HALIPLIDAE Aubé, 1836: 15

Haliplus gravidus Aubé, 1838: 26

Bonaire

Haliplus gravidus: van Vondel & Spangler 2008: 94 – Onima, PWH; Pos Baca Grandi, PWH

Curaçao

Haliplus gravidus: van Vondel & Spangler 2008: 94 – Santa Martha, RHC; Tanki di Terra Corá, PWH

St. Martin

Haliplus gravidus: van Vondel & Spangler 2008: 94 – Bloomendale Cistern, PWH

Family NOTERIDAE Thomson, 1860: 34

Hydrocanthus debilis Sharp, 1882: 281

Aruba

Hydrocanthus debilis: Higler & van Halewijn 1991: 2166 – lake Bubali, no leg.

Details about collection dates for all lake Bubali records can be found in the more extensive report (van Halewijn et al. 1992).

Suphis cimicoides Aubé, 1837a: 209

Aruba

Suphis cimicoides: Higler & van Halewijn 1991: 2166 – lake Bubali, no leg.

For the year of publication see Bousquet (2016).

Suphisellus nigrinus (Aubé, 1838): 411

Aruba

Suphisellus nigrinus: Higler & van Halewijn 1991: 2166 – lake Bubali, no leg.

Family DYTISCIDAE Leach, 1815: 84

Subfamily COPELATINAE Branden, 1885: 82

Copelatus caelatipennis Aubé, 1838: 382

Aruba

Copelatus caelatipennis: Higler & van Halewijn 1991: 2166 – lake Bubali, no leg.

Subfamily HYDROPORINAE Aubé, 1836: 14

Celina Aubé, 1837a

Aruba

Celina species: Higler & van Halewijn 1991: 2166 – lake Bubali, no leg.

Saba

Celina species: Bass 2008: 35 – Sandy Cruz Trail Pool, DBA

Pachydrus globosus (Aubé, 1838): 457

Aruba

Pachydrus globosus: Higler & van Halewijn 1991: 2166 – lake Bubali, no leg.

Subfamily DYTISCINAE Leach, 1815: 84

Megadytes laevigatus (Olivier, 1791a): 308

Aruba

Megadytes laevigatus: Higler & van Halewijn 1991: 2166 – lake Bubali, no leg.

This species is usually attributed to Olivier (1795) but Olivier (1791a) provides the same description. This was recently corrected in the on-line Dytiscidae catalogue by Nilsson & Hájek (2018).

Thermonectus circumscriptus (Latreille, 1809): 223

St. Eustatius

Thermonectus circumscriptus: This study – Zeelandia Bay, KB

New species record for St. Eustatius. A single female collected from an abandoned swimming pool. Identified by Rafael Braga who studied this genus and presented a very useful poster to identify Thermonectus Dejean, 1833 females at the Annual Meeting of the Southwestern Branch of the Entomological Society of America, 2013, Las Cruces, New Mexico (Braga et al. 2013).

Suborder POLYPHAGA Emery, 1886: 654

Family HYDROPHILIDAE Latreille, 1802: 136

Ivie et al. (2009) presented a poster with a preliminary number of species per family found on Saba. It contained seven species of this family from Saba. The present paper contains information on four which means that at least three, as yet unpublished, other species are present on the island.

Subfamily HYDROPHILINAE Latreille, 1802: 136

Berosus Leach, 1817: 92

Aruba

Berosus species: Higler & van Halewijn 1991: 2166 – lake Bubali, no leg.

Enochrus sharpi Gundersen, 1977: 262

Aruba

Enochrus sharpi: Higler & van Halewijn 1991: 2166 – lake Bubali, no leg.

Hydrophilus insularis Laporte, 1840: 50

Aruba

Hydrophilus insularis: Higler & van Halewijn 1991: 2166 – lake Bubali, no leg.

Bonaire

Hydrous insularis: Werner 1925: 555 – no locality, AG

St. Eustatius

Hydrophilus insularis: This study – Venus Bay, KB

New species record for St. Eustatius. Identified by Oscar Vorst and the first author. Collected from an artificial pond.

Laccobius Erichson, 1837: 202

Saba

Laccobius species: Bass 2008: 35 – Sandy Cruz Trail Pool, DBA

Tropisternus collaris (Fabricius, 1775 ): 229

Aruba

Tropisternus collaris: Higler & van Halewijn 1991: 2166 – lake Bubali, no leg.

Tropisternus lateralis (Fabricius, 1775): 228

Aruba

Tropisternus lateralis: Higler & van Halewijn 1991: 2166 – lake Bubali, no leg.

Saba

Tropisternus lateralis: Bass 2008: 35 – Lynn Pond, Windward Side, DBA

St. Eustatius

Tropisternus lateralis: This study – Zeelandia Bay, KB

[St. Martin]

Tropisternus lateralis: Yokoyama 2013: 85 – without further data

New species record for St. Eustatius. Identified by Oscar Vorst and the first author. Three specimens collected from the same abandoned pool as Thermonectus circumscriptus. Listed and photographed by Yokoyama (2013) and shown as present with reference to Yokoyama on the website of the French l’Inventaire National du Patrimoine Naturel (INPN 2020) for St. Martin. It is not clear if vouchers are available.

Subfamily SPHAERIDIINAE Latreille, 1802: 135

Cercyon nigriceps (Marsham,1802): 72

Saba

Cercyon (Cercyon) nigriceps: Peck 2016: 51 – without further data

Introduced.

Oosternum sharpi Hansen, 1999: 242

Saba

Oosternum sharpi: Deler-Hernández et al. 2014: 57 – [Windwardside], DSS & MAI

Location based on the published geographic coordinates. Not listed by Peck (2016).

Phaenonotum exstriatum (Say, 1835): 171

Aruba

Phaenonotum exstriatum: van Halewijn et al. 1992: table 5 – lake Bubali, no leg.

Family HISTERIDAE Gyllenhal, 1808d: 74

Ivie et al. (2009) listed six species of this family from Saba. Peck (2016) listed two which means that at least five, as yet unpublished, other species are present on the island.

Subfamily ABRAEINAE MacLeay, 1819: 25

Aeletes Horn, 1873a: 356

Saba

Aeletes species Peck 2016: 52 – without further data

Halacritus blackwelderi Wenzel, 1944: 63

St. Eustatius

Halacritus blackwelderi: This study – Concordia Bay, EOC

New species record for St. Eustatius. Collected from under washed-up algae. Wenzel (1944) mentioned a specimen collected by Blackwelder on St. Kitts which may be this species but differs in several respects from the types from Antigua.

Subfamily HISTERINAE Gyllenhal, 1808d: 74

Hister servus Erichson, 1834: 147

Saba

Hister servus: Peck 2016: 54 – without further data

Subfamily SAPRININAE Blanchard, 1845

Hypocaccus brasiliensis (Paykull, 1811): 66

St. Eustatius

Hypocaccus brasiliensis: This study – Concordia Bay, JB; Concordia Bay, EOC

New species record for St. Eustatius and the northern Lesser Antilles. Although not recorded before, probably widespread in the area. Collected from under washed-up algae, a habitat that does not often seem to have been sampled in the Antilles.

Xerosaprinus testudo (Casey, 1916): 267

St. Eustatius

Xerosaprinus testudo: Grant & Turcatel 2020: GBIF – Oranjestad, BM

St. Martin

Xerosaprinus testudo: Grant & Turcatel 2020: GBIF – Philipsburg, BM

Curaçao

Xerosaprinus testudo: Grant & Turcatel 2020: GBIF – without further details

The above are all new island records. The FMNH-dataset in GBIF (Grant & Turcatel 2020) and SCAN (2020) erroneously list St. Eustatius as part of St. Martin and the St. Eustatius records are shown on the map of the southern part of St. Martin. The locality reads “Sint Eustatius, Oranjestad” though.

Xerosaprinus viator (Marseul, 1855): 499

Curaçao

Xerosaprinus viator: Mazur 2011: 194 – without further details

Family PTILIIDAE Erichson, 1845: 15

Ivie et al. (2009) listed five, as yet unpublished, species of this family from Saba.

Family LEIODIDAE Fleming, 1821: 51

Subfamily LEIODINAE Fleming, 1821: 51

Zeadolopus antiguensis Peck & Cook 2014: 22

Saba

Zeadolopus antiguensis Peck & Cook 2014: 22 – Bud’s Mountain Trail, DSS, JAS & J.F. Johnson; Bud’s Mountain Trail, DSS & MAI; Bud’s Mountain Trail, DSS et al.; Ecolodge on Mount Scenery, DSS & JAS; Scout’s Place Hotel, DSS

Family SCYDMAENIDAE Leach, 1815: 92

Subfamily SCYDMAENINAE Leach, 1815: 92

Euconnus satishanandi Makhan, 1997: 136

Curaçao

Euconnus satishanandi Makhan, 1997: 136 – Rooi Cajoeda, Knip, PWH

Euconnus Thomson, 1859: 61

Saba

Euconnus species: Peck 2016: 57 – without further data

Listed erroneously as Euconnus gouadeloupensis by Bos et al. (2018) possibly based on Peck (2016) who listed it under this species but clearly as unidentified material of the genus.

Family STAPHYLINIDAE Latreille, 1802: 124

Ivie et al. (2009) listed 54, as yet unpublished, species of this family from Saba.

Subfamily PSELAPHINAE Latreille, 1802: 239

Eupsenius politus Reitter, 1883: 36

St. Eustatius

Eupsenius politus: This study – The Quill, EOC, MK & AJW; crater rim The Quill, EOC, MK & AJW

New species record for St. Eustatius. Sieved from leaf litter.

Subfamily ALEOCHARINAE Fleming, 1821: 49

Diestota sperata Sharp, 1876: 47

St. Martin

Atheta sperata: Fauvel 1891: 124 – without further data

Not listed for St. Martin by Peck (2011, 2016). Besides Brazil, Cuba, Guadeloupe, Guatemala, Haiti, Mexico, Panama and Venezuela, Fauvel (1891) also listed “Saint Martin” without any further data. This material was probably in his own collection and currently in the Institut royal des Sciences naturelles de Belgique.

Subfamily OSORIINAE Erichson, 1839: 30

Molosoma Say, 1831: 48

St. Eustatius

Molosoma species: This study – The Quill, EOC, MK & AJW

New genus record for St. Eustatius. A single female sieved from leaf litter. This genus was treated as Osorius Guérin, 1829: pl. 9 by Peck (2011, 2016) and Osoriellus Fagel, 1959: 186 by Irmler (2014). Irmler (2016) later synonymised Osoriellus with Molosoma.

Subfamily MEGALOPSIDIINAE Leng, 1920: 98

Megalopinus punctatus (Erichson, 1840): 752

Curaçao

Megalops punctatus: Fauvel 1901: 74 – no locality, EFB

A single specimen. Puthz (2012) recently revised Megalopinus Eichelbaum, 1915 and described a series of new species. However, he did not investigate any specimens from Curaçao.

Subfamily PAEDERINAE Fleming, 1821: 49

Sciocharis exilis (Erichson, 1840): 627

St. Eustatius

Sciocharis exilis: This study – The Quill, EOC, MK & AJW

New species record for St. Eustatius. Sieved from leaf litter.

Subfamily STAPHYLININAE Latreille, 1802: 124

Cafius bistriatus (Erichson, 1840): 502

St. Eustatius

Cafius bistriatus: This study – Concordia Bay, EOC

New species record for St. Eustatius. Collected from sandy beach under algae.

Family PASSALIDAE Leach, 1815: 100

Ivie et al. (2009) listed one, as yet unpublished, species of this family from Saba.

Family TROGIDAE MacLeay, 1819: 59

Omorgus suberosus (Fabricius, 1775): 31

Bonaire

Trox species: Werner 1925: 556: no locality, AG

Omorgus suberosus: This study – Rincón, JKW

Saba

Omorgus suberosus: Peck 2016: 81 – without further data

St. Eustatius

Omorgus suberosus: This study – Oranjestad, EOC

St. Martin

Trox suberosus: Chalumeau & Gruner 1974: 788 – Koolbaai, FC

New species record for St. Eustatius. Several specimens were collected from a dead cow and at light. Jaap Winkelman’s specimen on Bonaire was caught with a light trap. Werner’s (1925) “Trox species” is probably this species. Vaurie (1962: 144) listed this species for St. Barthélemy, an island not listed by Peck (2011, 2016).

Family HYBOSORIDAE Erichson, 1847: 717

Subfamily HYBOSORINAE Erichson, 1847: 717

Hybosorus illigeri Reiche, 1853: 88

St. Eustatius

Hybosorus illigeri: This study – Zeelandia, EOC; Oranjestad, EOC

New species record for the Lesser Antilles. Collected from bovine dung near the beach at Zeelandia and from inside a light fixture in Oranjestad. Introduced, native to southern Europe. Hitherto known in the Antilles from Jamaica (Howden 1970), the Bahamas and Cuba (Kuijten 1983), and the Dominican Republic (Ocampo 2002). Ballerio et al. (2018) recently petitioned the ICZN to conserve the name Hybosorus illigeri by giving it precedence over several very rarely used senior synonyms.

Family SCARABAEIDAE Latreille, 1802: 144

Ivie et al. (2009) listed eight species of this family from Saba. The present paper contains information on seven which means that at least one, as yet unpublished, other species is present on the island.

Subfamily APHODIINAE Leach, 1815: 97

Labarrus lividus (Olivier, 1789a): 86

Saba

Labarrus lividus: Peck 2016: 83 – without further data

Introduced.

Nialaphodius nigrita (Fabricius, 1801b): 73

Saba

Nialaphodius nigrita: Peck 2016: 83 – without further data

St. Eustatius

Aphodius cuniculus: UPRM 2020: GBIF – no locality, STD

Nialaphodius nigrita: This study – Botanical Garden, KB

Introduced. New species record for St. Eustatius. The one from this study collected at light.

Ataenius complicatus Harold, 1869: 102

Curaçao

Ataenius complicatus: Stebnicka 2006: 94 – Hato, BM

Ataenius gracilis (Melsheimer, 1845): 137

Saba

Ataenius gracilis: Peck 2016: 85 – without further data

Ataenius scutellaris Harold, 1867a: 82

Saba

Ataenius scutellaris: Peck 2016: 86 – without further data

St. Martin

Ataenius scutellaris: Chalumeau & Gruner 1974: 803 – Koolbaai, FC

Ataenius strigicaudus Bates, 1887: 96

St. Eustatius

Ataenius cf. strigicaudus: This study – crater rim The Quill, EOC, MK & AJW

New provisional species record for St. Eustatius. A single female specimen sieved from leaf litter. As far as we are aware, Peck (2016) was the first to list Montserrat but he did so without the asterisk used in his paper for new island records.

Psammodius viti Chalumeau, 1983b: 83

St. Eustatius

Psammodius sp. aff. viti: This study – Concordia Bay, EOC

New genus record for St. Eustatius. A single specimen collected from a sandy beach under algae. Psammodius viti is only known from Les Saintes (Rakovič 1990, Gordon & Pittino 1992).

Subfamily CETONIINAE Leach, 1815: 99

Cotinis Burmeister, 1842: 254

Aruba

Cotinis species: This study – no locality, C.E. Fun

New genus record for Aruba. A female that keyed out as Cotinis mutabilis (Gory & Percheron, 1834: 70) in the key of Gasca-Álvarez & Deloya (2015). However, it did not completely match the species’ description. A search through the RMNH collection revealed 14 other specimens from Aruba but none from the other southern Dutch Antilles. The dissected aedeagus of a male specimen did not match that of C. mutabilis. Further study is needed to establish the identity of the Aruban Cotinis. For the year of publication of C. mutabilis see Bousquet (2016).

Subfamily SCARABAEINAE Latreille, 1802: 144

Digitonthophagus gazella (Fabricius, 1787a): 377

St. Eustatius

Digitonthophagus gazella: This study – Zeelandia, EOC; Oranjestad, EOC

[St. Martin]

Onthophagus gazella: Yokoyama 2013: 83 – without further data

New species record for St. Eustatius. Collected from bovine dung at the beach near Zeelandia, from bovine dung in Oranjestad and at light in Oranjestad. Listed and photographed by Yokoyama (2013) and shown as present with reference to Yokoyama on the website of the INPN (2020) for St. Martin. It is not clear if vouchers are available. As far as we could trace Peck (2010) was the first to list Antigua but it is unclear on which basis.

Introduced, native to Africa. The genus was recently revised by Génier & Moretto (2017). Their conclusions were that Digitonthophagus gazella comprises a species complex with 14 species and the name of the widely introduced species would be D. dorcas (Olivier, 1789a) if the principle of priority is applied (see also Génier & Davis 2017). To maintain nomenclatural stability an application has been submitted to the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature to conserve the name Scarabaeus gazella Fabricius, 1787a (Génier & Krell 2017).

Pseudocanthon Bates, 1887: 35

[Curaçao]

Coleoptera indet.: Benschop 2010: Observation.org – Willemstad, A. Benschop

A photo on the citizen-science website Observation.org shows a Pseudocanthon species that could be P. chlorizans (Bates, 1887): 34, a species otherwise known from the southern Antillean islands Bequia, Carriacou, Grenada, Mayreau, Mustique and Union and mainland Mexico, Belize and El Salvador (Peck 2016).

Subfamily MELOLONTHINAE Leach, 1819a: 189

Phyllophaga sanbarthensis Chalumeau & Gruner, 1976: 97

St. Martin

Phyllophaga sanbarthensis Chalumeau & Gruner, 1976: 97 – Philipsburg, PWH; Old Battery, PWH; Baie de Friar, FC

Phyllophaga sanbarthensis: Chalumeau 1985: 31 – Baie Longue, FC

Phyllophaga stehlei Chalumeau, 1985: 28

St. Martin

Phyllophaga stehlei Chalumeau, 1985: 28 – Pic Paradis, FC

Endemic to St. Martin.

Subfamily DYNASTINAE MacLeay, 1819: 64

Chalepides barbatus (Fabricius, 1787b): 10

St. Martin

Chalepides barbatus: Chalumeau & Gruner 1977: 590 – Jone’s Gut, P. Pinchon; Marigot, P. Pinchon; Cul-de-Sac, AD; Marigot, FC

Chalepides barbatus: Ratcliffe & Cave 2015: 73 – Cul-de-Sac, no leg.; Jones Gut, no leg.; le François, no leg.; Marigot, no leg.; Mullet Bay, no leg.; Quartier-d’Orléans, no leg.

Ratcliffe & Cave (2015: 72) also listed Nevis; Anonymous (1913: 186, as Dyscinetus barbatus), Hutson (1917: 266, as D. barbatus) and Ratcliffe & Cave (2015: 72), but strangely enough not Moore et al. (2018), added Barbuda to the range as published by Peck (2011, 2016).

Cyclocephala amazona (Linnaeus, 1767): 551

St. Martin

Cyclocephala amazona Ratcliffe & Cave 2015: 79 – Cul-de-Sac, no leg.; Jones Gut, no leg.; Marigot, no leg.

Ratcliffe & Cave (2015: 79) added St. Barthélemy to the range of this species as published by Peck (2011, 2016).

Cyclocephala immaculata (Olivier, 1789b): 29

St. Martin

Cyclocephala danforthi: Chapin, 1935: 69 – Great Bay, STD

Cyclocephala immaculata: Chalumeau & Gruner 1977: 582 – Grande Baie, FC

Cyclocephala immaculata: Ratcliffe & Cave 2015: 92 – Great Bay, no leg.

Ratcliffe & Cave (2015: 91-92) added Nevis, Barbuda and Antigua to the range of this species as published by Peck (2011, 2016).

Cyclocephala mafaffa Burmeister, 1847: 69

Saba

Cyclocephala mafaffa: Gillett & Gillett 2015: 4 – The Level, MPTG; English Quarter (Windwardside), MPTG; Upper Mountain Road, MPTG; Crispeen, MPTG

Cyclocephala mafaffa grandis: Ratcliffe & Cave 2015: 98 – Crispeen, no leg.; English Quarter, no leg.; Mountain Road, no leg.; Mount Scenery, no leg.; The Level, no leg.

Moore et al. (2020) recently synonymised the subspecies Cyclocephala mafaffa grandis under C. mafaffa.

Phileurus valgus (Olivier, 1789a): 43

[Curaçao]

Phileurus valgus: Oduber 2019: iNaturalist – Oranjestad, M. Oduber

Saba

Phileurus valgus antillarum: Gillett & Gillett 2015: 6 – The Level, MPTG; Maskerhorne Hill, MPTG; Mount Scenery, MPTG; Great Hill, MPTG

Phileurus valgus: Ratcliffe & Cave 2015: 264 – Crispeen, no leg.; Ecolodge, no leg.; Great Hill, no leg.; Maskerhorne Hill, no leg.; Mount Scenery, no leg.; The Level, no leg.

St. Eustatius

Phileurus valgus: Ratcliffe & Cave 2015: 264 – The Quill, no leg.

St. Martin

Phileurus valgus antillarum: Chalumeau & Gruner 1977: 599 – Koolbaai, FC

Phileurus valgus: Ratcliffe & Cave 2015: 264 – Koolbaai, no leg.

For a clarification of the authorship of this species see Ratcliffe & Cave (2015) and Hielkema (2017). The Curaçao record is based on a photo sent to the first author by Gerard van Buurt (Naturalis 2018a). Ratcliffe & Cave (2015: 263) added Anguilla and St. Kitts to the range of this species as published by Peck (2011, 2016).

Strategus aloeus (Linnaeus, 1758): 345

Curaçao

Strategus aloeus aloeus: Endrödi 1976: 136 – without further data

Tomarus cuniculus (Fabricius, 1801b): 20

Saba

Tomarus cuniculus: Gillett & Gillett 2015: 4 – The Level, MPTG; English Quarter (Windwardside), MPTG; Windwardside, MPTG; The Bottom, MPTG; Upper Mountain Road (Maskerhorne Hill), MPTG; Lower Mountain Road (Windwardside), MPTG; Crispeen, MPTG

Tomarus cuniculus: Ratcliffe & Cave 2015: 159 – Crispeen, no leg.; Mountain Road, no leg.; The Bottom, no leg.; The Level, no leg.; Windwardside, no leg.

Tomarus cuniculus: Peck 2016: 94 – without further data

St. Eustatius

Tomarus cuniculus: This study – Bengalen Road, VZZ; Oranjestad, JB; Oranjestad, HM; Oranjestad, EOC, Oranjestad, AJW

St. Martin

Ligyrus cuniculus: Chalumeau & Gruner 1977: 591 – no locality, FC

Tomarus cuniculus: Ratcliffe & Cave 2015: 159 – Mullet Bay, no leg.

New species record for St. Eustatius. Collected at light and from vegetation. Ratcliffe & Cave (2015: 157) added Barbuda to the range as published by Peck (2011, 2016).

Tomarus fossor (Latreille, 1813): 11

Bonaire

Ligyrus fossor: Werner 1925: 556 – no locality, AG

Curaçao

Ligyrus (Ligyrus) fossor: Endrödi 1969: 54 – without further data

Not in Peck (2011, 2016) but listed by Ratcliffe & Cave (2015: 164) for Antigua, a first record for the northern Lesser Antilles based on a single specimen. For the year of publication see Mac Gillavry (1931) and Bousquet (2016).

Family BUPRESTIDAE Leach, 1815: 85

The table in Brûlé et al. (2017) mentioned seven species for Saba, which is clearly erroneous. Hitherto, only the species below is known from this island (see also Ivie et al. 2009).

Subfamily BUPRESTINAE Leach, 1815: 85

Chrysobothris sabae Maier & Ivie, 2013: 86

Saba

Chrysobothris sabae Maier & Ivie, 2013: 86 – Spring Bay Trail, base of Old Booby Hill, DSS, JAS & G.D. Alpert)

Chrysobothris sabae: Sikes 2020: GBIF – same as above

Chrysobothris sabae: Orrell 2020: GBIF – same as above

Endemic to Saba.

Conognatha olivacea Saunders, 1869: 336

Curaçao

Pithiscus nickerli: Obenberger, 1924: 96 – without further data

Conognatha olivacea: Moore & Lander 2010: 116 – without further data

Family PTILODACTYLIDAE Laporte, 1836: 21

Ivie et al. (2009) listed one, as yet unpublished, species of this family from Saba.

Family CHELONARIIDAE Blanchard, 1845: 70

Chelonarium pilosellum Chevrolat, 1880a: 260

Saba

Chelonarium pilosellum: Peck 2016: 103 – without further data

Family ELATERIDAE Leach, 1815: 85

Ivie et al. (2009) listed four species of this family from Saba. Peck (2016) listed two which means that at least two, as yet unpublished, other species are present on the island.

Subfamily ELATERINAE Leach, 1815: 85

Dicrepidius ignotus Fleutiaux & Sallé, 1890: 409

Saba

Dicrepidius ignotus: Peck 2016: 106 – without further data

Physorhinus distigma Candèze, 1859: 390

St. Eustatius

Physorhinus distigma: Schaaf 1971: 62 – without further data [leg. probably BM]

Not listed by Peck (2011, 2016) for the Antilles. Schaaf (1971: 62) also listed Antigua. In light of the disjunct distribution [i.e. Texas, Mexico, Belize, Honduras, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia, Peru, Ecuador, Brazil, Paraguay, Argentina and the two Caribbean islands (Aguirre-Tapiero & Johnson 2014)] and the fact that Schaaf described this species as extremely variable, Physorhinus distigma sensu Schaaf might prove to be a complex of related species.

Subfamily CARDIOPHORINAE Candèze, 1859: 4

Esthesopus poedicus Candèze, 1860: 277

St. Eustatius

Esthesopus poedicus: This study – The Quill, KB

St. Martin

Esthesopus poedicus: Chassain & Touroult 2012: 65 – airport, JHPB

New species record for St. Eustatius. Collected from a blacklight trap.

Subfamily AGRYPNINAE Candèze, 1857: 17

Aeolus circumscriptus (Germar, 1823): 46

St. Martin

Aeolus sp. aff. circumscriptus: Chassain & Touroult 2012: 67 – Quartier d’Orléans, FC

See Bousquet (2016) for the year of publication of Germar’s description.

Conoderus bifoveatus Palisot de Beauvois, 1807: 78

Saba

Conoderus bifoveatus: Peck 2016: 108 – without further data

St. Eustatius

Conoderus bifoveatus: This study – Botanical Garden, KB; Oranjestad, EOC

St. Martin

Conoderus bifoveatus: Chassain & Touroult 2012: 65 – beach, JHPB; Colombier, FC; Grisette, FC; Philipsburg, FC; Quartier d’Orléans, FC

Conoderus bifoveatus: Touroult 2019a: GBIF – without locality, JHPB; Grisette, FC

New species record for St. Eustatius. Collected at light. For the year of publication see Menke (1963), Evenhuis (1997) and Bousquet (2016).

Conoderus castaneus (Fabricius, 1792a): 226

St. Martin

Conoderus castaneus: Chassain & Touroult 2012: 65 – Pic Paradis, FC

Heteroderes amplicollis (Gyllenhal, 1817): 141

St. Martin

Heteroderes amplicollis: Chassain & Touroult 2012: 67 – no locality, JHPB

Heteroderes amplicollis: Touroult 2019a: GBIF – same as above

Lacon subcostatus (Candèze, 1857): 69

[St. Martin]

Chassain & Touroult (2012) suspected this species to be present on St. Martin as well as St. Barthélemy but is has not yet been collected there.

Family LAMPYRIDAE Rafinesque, 1815: 110

Subfamily LAMPYRINAE Rafinesque, 1815: 110

Aspisoma ignitum (Linnaeus, 1767): 645

St. Eustatius

Aspisoma ignitum: This study – The Quill, EOC

St. Martin

Aspisoma ignitum: Chalumeau in litt. 2020

New species records for St. Eustatius and St. Martin. The one from St. Eustatius hand-collected from vegetation. Touroult (Touroult 2019a) listed a specimen collected by Chalumeau on St. Martin on GBIF which was later deleted from his dataset for unknown reasons (Touroult in litt. 2020). Fortuné Chalumeau (in litt. 2020) confirmed this record and added that the species is quite present on the island. Also listed in Questel (2014) for St. Barthélemy and shown as present on the INPN (2020) map for St. Barthélemy with reference to Questel. It is not clear if vouchers are available.

Family DERMESTIDAE Latreille, 1804: 142

Ivie et al. (2009) listed one, as yet unpublished, species of this family from Saba.

Attagenus fasciatus (Thunberg, 1795): 105

Bonaire

Attagenus fasciatus: This study – Rincón, JKW

New species record for Bonaire.

Dermestes maculatus De Geer, 1774: 223

St. Eustatius

Dermestes maculatus: This study – Oranjestad, EOC

New species record for St. Eustatius. Many specimens were collected from a dead cow. Hitherto only known in the Lesser Antilles from Montserrat and Guadeloupe but suspected to be present throughout the archipelago (Peck 2016).

Trogoderma serraticorne (Fabricius, 1792b): 265

Aruba

Trogoderma anthrenoides: Háva 2003: 132 – without further data

Trogoderma anthrenoides (Sharp, 1902: 649) was synonymised with T. serraticorne by Háva (2016). Also listed by Beal (1960: 18) for Antigua, an island not listed by Peck (2011, 2016).

Family BOSTRICHIDAE Latreille, 1802: 202

Subfamily POLYCAONINAE Lesne, 1896: 96

Melalgus gonagrus (Fabricius, 1798): 156

Saba

Melalgus gonagrus: Peck 2016: 116 – without further data

Peck (2016) listed both this species and Melalgus caribeanus (Lesne, 1906): 396, for Montserrat. As far as we are aware the Ivie et al. (2008b) record of Melalgus caribeanus is the only published occurrence of this genus on Montserrat. Peck added that the two taxa might prove to be synonymous.

Subfamily BOSTRICHINAE Latreille, 1802: 202

Amphicerus cornutus (Pallas, 1772): 8

Bonaire

Schistocercus cornutus: Werner 1925: 556 – no locality, AG

[Curaçao]

Amphicerus cornutus: Scannell 2018: iNaturalist – Willemstad, P. Scannell

St. Eustatius

Amphicerus cornutus: This study – without further data

St. Martin

Schistoceros cornutus: Lesne 1899: 510 – without further data

New species record for St. Eustatius. Delivered at the Caribbean Netherlands Science Institute on 9-x-2015 without further data. As far as we are aware, Peck (2016) was the first to list Anguilla but he did so without the asterisk which indicates a new island record in his checklist.

Xylomeira tridens (Fabricius, 1792a): 362

St. Eustatius

Xylomeira tridens: This study – The Quill, JTS

[St. Martin]

Xylomeira tridens: Yokoyama 2013: 85 – without further data

New species record for St. Eustatius. Collected from a Malaise trap. Listed and photographed by Yokoyama (2013) and shown as present with reference to Yokoyama on the website of the INPN (2020) for St. Martin. It is not clear if vouchers are available.

Family ANOBIIDAE Fleming, 1821: 50

Ivie et al. (2009) listed nine, as yet unpublished, species of this family from Saba.

Subfamily DORCATOMINAE Thomson, 1859: 90

Cryptorama antillensis White, 1984: 85

St. Eustatius

Cryptorama cf. antillensis: This study – The Quill, EOC

New provisional record for St. Eustatius. Beaten from vegetation. Elsewhere known from Cuba, Guadeloupe and Trinidad, provisionally from Montserrat, and a species near this from Guana, British Virgin Islands (White 1984, Valentine & Ivie 2005, Ivie et al. 2008b).

Petalium pici Lepesme, 1947: 220

St. Eustatius

Petalium cf. pici: This study – Botanical Garden, KB

New provisional record for St. Eustatius. Collected at light. This species is only known from Guadeloupe (Lepesme 1947).

Petalium LeConte, 1861: 204

St. Eustatius

Petalium species: This study – The Quill, EOC

A Petalium species differing from the species above. Beaten from vegetation.

Tricorynus neltumae (Fisher 1942): 37

St. Eustatius

Tricorynus cf. neltumae: This study – Botanical Garden, KB

New provisional record for St. Eustatius. A single male specimen collected at light. Elsewhere, known from the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico (White 1963).

Subfamily PTININAE Latreille, 1802: 112

Bellesus cristithorax (Bellés, 1985): 231

Aruba

Arachnomimus cristithorax: Philips 2000: 262 – without further data

Bonaire

Arachnomimus cristithorax: Philips 2000: 262 – without further data

Curaçao

Arachnomimus cristithorax: Philips 2000: 262 – without further data

Pitnus longicornis Bellés, 1992: 182

Bonaire

Pitnus longicornis Bellés, 1992: 182 – Lac Cai, no leg.; Klein Bonaire, no leg.; Playa Palu Calbas, no leg.

Curaçao

Pitnus longicornis Bellés, 1992: 182 – Fuik Baai, no leg.; Boca Grandi, no leg.

Pitnus robustus Bellés, 1992: 181

Aruba

Pitnus robustus Bellés, 1992: 181 – Hofje Fontein, no leg.; Sabana Blanco, no leg.; Boekoeti reef, no leg.; Seroe Colorado, no leg.

Curaçao

Pitnus robustus Bellés, 1992: 181 – Klein Curaçao, no leg.

Family TROGOSSITIDAE LatreiIIe, 1802: 159

Subfamily LOPHOCATERINAE Crowson, 1964: 297

Lophocateres pusillus (Klug, 1833): 71

[Curaçao]

Lophocateres pusillus: Barron 1971: 43 – without further data

Barron (1971) listed specimen(s) from the District of Columbia imported in beans from Curaçao. However, it is not clear if the species has established itself on the island. The citation for the original description is not Klug, 1832: 159 as in Blackwelder (1945) nor Klug, 1833: 159 as in Peck (2016). Klug’s description was published twice, first as a separate publication of the Königlichen Akademie der Wissenschaften (Klug 1833: 71), later in the Abhandlungen der Königlichen Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Berlin (Klug 1834b: 159).

Family CLERIDAE Latreille, 1802: 110

Subfamily ENOPLIINAE Gistel, 1848a: [6]

Neorthopleura turnbowi Opitz, 2019: 995

Curaçao

Neorthopleura turnbowi Opitz, 2019: 995 – Christoffel Park, The Woods, RHT; Christoffel Park,

Mountain Route, RHT; Copper Mine Trail, RHT; weg naar Playa Kanoa, RHT; Christoffel Park, Northern Route, RHT; Malpais Trail, RHT; Playa Kanoa, RHT; Santa Cruz, RHT; Playa Parasasa, RHT; Park Woods, RHT; Seru Jamanika, RHT; North Car Route, MCT; South Car Route, MCT; dry stream bed at Christoffelberg trailhead, MCT; Copper Mine, MCT

Endemic to Curaçao.

Subfamily KORYNETINAE Laporte, 1836: 34

Necrobia rufipes (De Geer, 1775): 165

St. Eustatius

Necrobia rufipes: This study – Oranjestad, EOC

[St. Martin]

Necrobia rufipes: Yokoyama 2013: 85 – without further data

New species record for St. Eustatius. Several specimens were collected from a dead cow. Listed and photographed by Yokoyama (2013) and shown as present with reference to Yokoyama on the website of the INPN (2020) for St. Martin. It is not clear if vouchers are available.

Family MELYRIDAE Leach, 1815: 87

Ivie et al. (2009) listed one, as yet unpublished, species of this family from Saba.

Subfamily MELYRINAE Leach, 1815: 87

Astylus Laporte, 1836: 32

[Curaçao]

Astylus lebasi: Sarkiss 2018: iNaturalist – Jan Doret, Sint Michiel, A. Sarkiss

Astylus lebasi: Scannell 2019: iNaturalist – Santa Catharina, P. Scannell

Several records with photo identified as Astylus lebasi Champion, 1918: 363 are listed on iNaturalist and, based on these, on GBIF. It could be this species but in the absence of a key and a modern revision they are here referred to Astylus species.

Family NITIDULIDAE Latreille, 1802: 131

Ivie et al. (2009) listed seven species of this family from Saba. Peck (2016) listed two which means that at least five, as yet unpublished, other species are present on the island.

Subfamily CILLAEINAE Kirejtshuk & Audisio, 1986: 219

Conotelus conicus (Fabricius, 1801a): 603

St. Martin

Conotelus conicus: Jelínek & Nicholas Evans 1982: 235 – no locality, HER

Subfamily CARPOPHILINAE Erichson, 1842: 148

Carpophilus Stephens, 1830: 50

Curaçao

Carpophilus pilosellus: Connell 1963: 90 – without further data

Introduced. As Peck (2016) already mentioned there is confusion regarding the limits of several species of Carpophilus. African and European specimens of C. pilosellus auct. nec Motschulsky, 1858: 41 were identified as C. truncatus Murray, 1864: 381 by Audisio (1982, 2011) and Kirejtshuk (1996). The true identity of the American specimens is as yet unknown. Carpophilus pilosellus Motschulsky, 1858 should be considered synonymous with C. mutilatus Erichson, 1843: 258 (Kirejtshuk 1996, Jelínek & Audisio 2007).

Epuraea luteola Erichson, 1843: 272

Saba

Epuraea luteola: Peck 2016: 127 – without further data

Not described as member of the genus Haptoncus Murray, 1864: 401 by Erichson (1843) as quoted by Peck (2016).

Subfamily NITIDULINAE Latreille, 1802: 131

Lobiopa insularis (Laporte, 1840): 10

Saba

Lobiopa insularis: Peck 2016: 127 – without further data

[St. Martin]

Lobiopa insularis: Yokoyama 2013: 85 – without further data

Listed and photographed by Yokoyama (2013) and shown on the website of the INPN (2020) as present on St. Martin with reference to Yokoyama. It is not clear if vouchers are available.

Stelidota strigosa (Gyllenhal, 1808b): 140

St. Eustatius

Nitidula strigosa Gyllenhal, 1808b: 140 – no locality, JEF

Nitidula lusca Gyllenhal, 1808c: 140 – no locality, JEF

Stelidota strigosa: This study – The Quill, EOC, MK & AJW

Sieved from leaf litter. Despite the fact that both of Gyllenhal’s names are based on specimens from St. Eustatius, Stelidota strigosa is only listed for the island by Parsons (1943) and not by subsequent authors including Blackwelder (1945) and Peck (2011, 2016). Also present on Montserrat (Ivie et al. 2008b). Peck (2016) did refer to Ivie et al. (2008b) under S. strigosa but listed their record under S. thoracica Kirsch, 1873: 142.

Subfamily CYBOCEPHALINAE Jacquelin du Val, 1858: 151

Cybocephalus caribaeus Smith, 2007: 167

Curaçao

Cybocephalus caribaeus Smith, 2007: 167 – Coral Specht, 3 km. E. Willemstad, WES & JMS

Cybocephalus caribaeus: Orrell 2020: GBIF – same as above

Family SMICRIPIDAE Horn, 1880: 268

Ivie et al. (2009) listed one, as yet unpublished, species of this family from Saba.

Family MONOTOMIDAE Laporte, 1840: 377

Ivie et al. (2009) listed two species of this family from Saba. Peck (2016) listed a single species which means that at least one, as yet unpublished, other species is present on the island.

Subfamily MONOTOMINAE Laporte, 1840: 377

Bactridium heydeni (Reitter, 1873a): 33

Curaçao

Bactridium heydeni: UGCA 2020: GBIF – Christoffel Park, Copper Mine Trail, RHT

Monotoma longicollis (Gyllenhal, 1827): 635

Curaçao

Monotoma longicollis: UGCA 2020: GBIF – Playa Santa Cruz Road, RHT

Monotoma spinicollis Aubé, 1837b: 463

Saba

Monotoma spinicollis: Peck 2016: 129 – without further data

The page number of the original description is 463, not 462 as in Blackwelder (1945) and Peck (2016).

Family SILVANIDAE Kirby, 1837: 110

Ivie et al. (2009) listed one, as yet unpublished, species of this family from Saba.

Monanus concinnulus (Walker, 1858): 207

St. Eustatius

Monanus concinnulus: This study – The Quill, EOC, MK & AJW

New species record for St. Eustatius; introduced. Sieved from leaf litter. Peck (2016) listed Cathartus quadricollis (Guérin-Méneville, 1837): pl. 41 for Montserrat probably with reference to Ivie et al. (2008b: 249). However, there is no such record there. Ivie et al. (2008b) did list Monanus concinnus (sic!) (Walker) which very probably refers to this species. Monanus concinnulus was not listed in Peck (2016) for Montserrat nor is Ivie et al. (2008b) referenced by him.

Family PASSANDRIDAE Blanchard, 1845: 134

Taphroscelidia atratula (Grouvelle, 1916): 16

Curaçao

Taphroscelidia atratula: Burckhardt & Slipinski 1991: 472 – Isla Hato, BM

Family PHALACRIDAE Leach, 1815: 116

Apallodes Reitter, 1873b: 130

Saba

Litolibrus species: Peck 2016: 134 – without further data

Gimmel (2013) synonymised Litolibrus Sharp, 1889: 258 with Apallodes.

Litostilbus testaceus (Fabricius, 1792b): 83 / Litostilbus tristriatus (Casey, 1890): 142

Saba

Ochrolitus triseriatus (sic!): Peck 2016: 134 – without further data

St. Eustatius

Litostilbus testaceus: This study – Botanical Garden, KB; The Quill, EOC

New species record for St. Eustatius. Peck (2016), probably based on Blackwelder (1945), who listed “Litostilbus testaceus Fabricius, 1775: 83” with the remark that there is a questionable record from St. Thomas. L. testaceus was described by Fabricius in 1792 as Sphaeridium testaceum with type locality “America meridionalis Insulis” which was later restricted to St. Thomas by Gimmel (2013). There is also a record from the Cayman Islands (Thomas et al. 2013). At present Litostilbus contains two New World species: L. testaceus [lectotype digitised (Natural History Museum of Denmark 2020)] and L. tristriatus (Casey, 1890) [not Casey, 1893 as in Arnett et al. (2002) and Peck (2016), see Bousquet (2012) and Gimmel (2013)], type from Florida. In his genus-level revision of the family Phalacridae, Gimmel (2013) stated that the two species are probably synonymous. If Gimmel’s impression is correct Litostilbus testaceus (Fabricius, 1792) is the valid name for this species.

Family CRYPTOPHAGIDAE Kirby, 1826: 504

Subfamily ATOMARIINAE LeConte, 1861: 99

Curelius japonicus (Reitter, 1878): 181

Saba

Curelius japonicus: Peck 2016: 134 – without further data

Family LANGURIIDAE Hope, 1840: 190

Subfamily XENOSCELINAE Ganglbauer, 1899: 649

Loberus LeConte, 1861: 98

Saba

Loberus species Peck 2016: 135 – without further data

Family EROTYLIDAE Latreille, 1802: 233

Ivie et al. (2009) listed five, as yet unpublished, species of this family from Saba.

Subfamily EROTYLINAE Latreille, 1802: 233

Iphiclus sedecimguttatus (Olivier, 1792): 436

Curaçao

Brachysphaenus sedecimguttatus: Deelder 1942: 63 – no locality, Perroud

This species is sometimes referred to as Iphiclus maculatus (Voet, 1778) (e.g. Alvarenga 1977). Voet’s name is however unavailable as it was published in a work not consistently binominal (Art. 11.4 of the Code). See also Skelley (2020).

Family CERYLONIDAE Billberg, 1820a: 47

Ivie et al. (2009) listed one, as yet unpublished, species of this family from Saba.

Family ENDOMYCHIDAE Leach, 1815: 116

Subfamily MEROPHYSIINAE Seidlitz, 1872: 39

Holoparamecus aelleni Rücker, 1988: 1027

Curaçao

Holoparamecus aelleni Rücker, 1988: 1027 – Hato Caves, VA & PS; San Pedro Plane Caves, VA & PS

Endemic to Curaçao.

Family COCCINELLIDAE Latreille, 1807: 70

Numerous species of this family have been introduced in the Antilles for biological control. These introduced species were not always correctly identified and it is also not always clear whether the various species actually established themselves on the islands. Moreover, records for this family are often anecdotal. Except for the various papers by Gordon, only Peck (2016, in part.) and Bennett & Simmonds (1964) explicitly state that their records are based on vouchers. Duverger (2001) compiled a checklist for the Coccinellidae of the Lesser Antilles based on literature records and his own observations. It is unclear if these records are based on vouchers. Duverger’s work has not been published but is available on the Internet. Ivie et al. (2009) listed 18 species of this family from Saba. The present paper contains information on four which means that at least 14, as yet unpublished, other species are present on the island.

Subfamily STICHOLOTIDINAE Weise, 1901: 430

Coccidophilus cariba Gordon, 1978: 206

Curaçao

Coccidophilus cariba Gordon, 1978: 206 – no locality, FDB

Delphastus catalinae (Horn, 1895): 83

[St. Martin]

Delphastus catalinae Duverger 2001: no pagination – without further data

Delphastus diversipes (Champion, 1913): 126

Curaçao

Delphastus diversipes: Bennett & Simmonds 1964: 89 – without further data

St. Eustatius

Delphastus diversipes: Bennett & Simmonds 1964: 89 – without further data

Delphastus pallidus ( LeConte, 1878 ): 400

[St. Martin]

Delphastus pallidus: Duverger 2001: no pagination – without further data

Delphastus pusillus ( LeConte, 1852a ): 135

[St. Martin]

Delphastus pusillus: Duverger 2001: no pagination – without further data

Delphastus quinculus Gordon, 1994: 120

[St. Martin]

Delphastus quinculus: Duverger 2001: no pagination – without further data

Until Gordon (1994) published his revision of Delphastus, species in this genus were often misidentified, a trend that still continues because of unfamiliarity with this work (see for instance Booth & Polaszek 1996, Hoelmer & Pickett 2003, González et al. 2012, González 2015). Reports of Delphastus species must thus be dealt with very critically. Duverger (2001) referred to literature records for D. catalinae and D. quinculus for St. Martin without mentioning the source(s). We have not been able to find these.

Subfamily SCYMNINAE Mulsant, 1846: 189

Specimens in this subfamily, especially living ones used in biological control, are difficult to identify and have often been the subject of misidentification and other confusion. Records of Scymninae are here dealt with critically.

Clitostethus dispar (Sicard, 1929): 530

Curaçao

Clitostethus dispar: Bennett & Simmonds 1964: 82 – without further data

St. Martin

Clitostethus dispar: Bennett & Simmonds 1964: 82 – without further data

Often confused with Nephaspis species (Cock 1985, Gordon & Hilburn 1990).

Cryptolaemus montrouzieri Mulsant, 1853: 268

[St. Martin]

Cryptolaemus montrouzieri: Duverger 2001: no pagination – without further data

Decadiomus hughesi Gordon & Hilburn, 1990: 279

[St. Martin]

Decadiomus hughesi: Duverger 2001: no pagination – without further data

Diomus ochroderus (Mulsant, 1850): 951

Curaçao

Scymnus (Diomus) ochroderus: Bennett & Simmonds 1964: 83 – without further data

Diomus roseicollis (Mulsant, 1853): 270

Curaçao

Diomus roseicollis: Peck 2006: 187 – without further data

St. Martin

Diomus roseicollis: Peck 2006: 187 – without further data

Hyperaspis connectens (Thunberg, 1808): 157

Saba

Hyperaspis connectens: Bennett & Simmonds 1964: 87 – without further data

St. Eustatius

Coccinella connectens Thunberg, 1808: 157 – no locality, JEF

Hyperaspis connectens: Bennett & Simmonds 1964: 87 – without further data

Hyperaspis donzeli (Mulsant, 1850): 638

[St. Eustatius]

Hyperaspis donzeli: Bennett & Simmonds 1964: 87 – without further data

Gordon & Canepari (2008) revised Hyperaspis and stated that Hyperaspis donzeli is only known from Brazil and Paraguay. They described the new species H. pseudodonzeli (see below) and listed a paratype from Curaçao. However, they did not investigate a specimen from St. Eustatius. Which of the two, if any, is present on St. Eustatius is unclear.

Hyperaspis festiva Mulsant, 1850: 659

Curaçao

Hyperaspis festiva: Bennett & Simmonds 1964: 87 – without further data

[St. Martin]

Hyperaspis festiva: Duverger 2001: no pagination – without further data

Hyperaspis pseudodonzeli Gordon & Canepari, 2008: 320

Curaçao

Hyperaspis donzeli: Bennett & Simmonds 1964: 87 – without further data

Hyperaspis pseudodonzeli Gordon & Canepari, 2008: 320- Schottegatweg, JMC

[St. Eustatius]

Hyperaspis donzeli: Bennett & Simmonds 1964: 87 – without further data

See comment under Hyperaspis donzeli. Although the Gordon and Canepari paper was listed in the reference section of Peck (2016), he did not mention this species.

Hyperaspis scutifera (Mulsant, 1850): 565

Curaçao

Hyperaspis scutifera: Gordon & Canepari 2008: 303 – Schottegatweg, no leg.; Damacor, no leg.; Zapateer, no leg.

Hyperaspis scutifera: Wheeler et al. 2010: 569 – same specimens as above

Nephaspis bootes Gordon, 1997: 18

Curaçao

[Nephaspis amnicola: Gordon 1972: 149 – no locality, FDB?]

Nephaspis bootes Gordon, 1997: 18 – Coral Specht, WES & JMS

Nephaspis bootes: Peck 2006: 187 – without further data

In his first revision of Nephaspis Gordon (1972) listed a Nephaspis-specimen from Curaçao as N. amnicola. This taxon was later synonymised with N. oculata (Gordon 1985). In his second revision Gordon (1997) stated that N. oculata is originally a Gulf Coast species and all specimens from outside the United States (U.S.) listed in Gordon (1972) belong to other species. However, Vandenberg (2002) assumed Nephaspis to be neotropical and the U.S. population only established in scattered localities. Peck (2009a) on the other hand seemed to follow Gordon (1997), considering N. oculata a Nearctic species and suggesting that neotropical records of N. oculata are probably N. equuleus Gordon, 1997. Gordon’s (1997) description was based on an different specimen than the one from F.D. Bennett which makes it unclear whether that particular specimen belongs here or is the species below.

Nephaspis oculata (Blatchley, 1917): 140

[Curaçao]

Nephaspis amnicola: Gordon 1972: 149 – no locality, FDB

[St. Martin]

Nephaspis amnicola: Gordon 1972: 149 – no locality, FJS

Nephaspis oculata: Duverger 2001: no pagination – without further data

See also the text under the previous species. Gordon’s (1997) statement that all specimens from non-U.S. localities of Nephaspis oculata listed in Gordon (1972) belong to other species and the fact that he did not list a specimen from St. Martin in his second revision make it unclear which Nephaspis species actually occurs on St. Martin. The St. Martin record of Duverger (2001) is based on literature, supposedly on Gordon’s (1972) paper.

Scymnus floralis (Fabricius, 1792b): 260

Curaçao

Scymnus floralis: Bennett & Simmonds 1964: 83 – without further data

Saba

Scymnus floralis: Bennett & Simmonds 1964: 83 – without further data

St. Eustatius

Scymnus floralis: Bennett & Simmonds 1964: 83 – without further data

[St. Martin]

Scymnus floralis: Duverger 2001: no pagination – without further data

Stethorus albipes (Mulsant, 1850 ): 998

St. Eustatius

Stethorus caribus: Gordon & Chapin, 1983: 245 – Fort Orange, FJS

This species is listed as Stethorus caribus in, among other papers, Duverger (2001), Valentine & Ivie (2005), Peck (2011, 2016) and Bos et al. (2018). However, after examination of the lectotype of S. albipes, Gordon (1993) synonymised S. caribus with S. albipes. The lectotype designation by Gordon (1987) also added St. Barthélemy to the range of this species. Stethorus albipes is thus present on Puerto Rico, Cuba, Hispaniola, Guana, St. Barthélemy, St. Eustatius, Nevis, Montserrat, Antigua, Barbados, Grenada, St. Lucia, Colombia and Latin America.

Stethorus pseudocaribus Gordon & Chapin, 1983

Bonaire

Stethorus pseudocaribus Gordon & Chapin, 1983: 247 – Kralendijk, JMC

Stethorus pseudocaribus: Orrell 2020: GBIF – same as above

Subfamily CHILOCHORINAE Mulsant, 1846: 166

Chilocorus cacti (Linnaeus, 1767): 584

St. Eustatius

Chilocorus cacti: This study – inland from Corre Corre Bay, JTS

[St. Martin]

Chilocorus cacti: Yokoyama 2013: 84 – without further data

Chilocorus cacti: Mlodinow 2017: iNaturalist – Saline d’Orient, S. Mlodinow

New species record for St. Eustatius. Listed and photographed by Yokoyama (2013) and shown as present with reference to Yokoyama on the website of the INPN (2020) for St. Martin. Listed for St. Barthélemy by Questel (2014). Also present on St. Kitts-Nevis (Cock 1985: 19, van Lenteren & Bueno 2020: 407). It is not clear if vouchers are available for these records. An additional record from Anguilla on iNaturalist (Bourque 2019).

Subfamily COCCIDULINAE Mulsant, 1846: 266

Pseudoazya trinitatis (Marshall, 1912): 320

St. Eustatius

Azya trinitatis: Bennett & Simmonds 1964: 91 – without further data

Also listed for St. Barthélemy by Questel (2014). It is not clear if vouchers are available.

Rodolia cardinalis (Mulsant, 1850 ): 906

[St. Martin]

Rodolia cardinalis: Yokoyama 2010: 79 – without further data

Vedalia cardinalis was described on page 906 and not 901 as mentioned in Peck (2016). Listed and photographed by Yokoyama (2010) for St. Martin. It is not clear if vouchers are available. Also introduced as a biological control agent against Icerya purchasi Maskell, 1878 (Hemiptera) on St. Kitts, Nevis, Antigua and Montserrat (Bennett 1971: 371, Cock 1985: 4-7, van Lenteren & Bueno 2020: 405). Not listed by Peck (2011, 2016) for these islands.

Subfamily COCCINELLINAE Latreille, 1807: 70

Cheilomenes sexmaculata (Fabricius, 1781): 96

Curaçao

Cheilomenes sexmaculata: Assour & Behm 2019: 864 – Curaçao Zoo, Willemstad, JEB & HRA

This species was first identified from a photo taken at the test site of the Dienst Landbouw, Veeteelt en Visserij (Office of Agriculture, Animal Husbandry and Fisheries) on Curaçao sent by Carel de Haseth (Naturalis 2018b). Later its occurrence on the island was confirmed in a paper by Assour & Behm (2019).

Coleomegilla maculata (De Geer, 1775): 392

[Aruba]

Coleomegilla maculata: Mlodinow 2017: iNaturalist – Palm Beach, S. Mlodinow

Coleomegilla maculata: Tromp 2019: iNaturalist – Bubali Bird Sanctuary, M. Tromp

Curaçao

Coleomegilla maculata: Bennett & Simmonds 1964: 93 – without further data

[St. Martin]

Coleomegilla maculata: Duverger 2001: no pagination – without further data

Coleomegilla maculata might prove to be a species complex (Krafsur & Obrycki 2000, Pérez & Hoy 2002 but also see Greenstone et al. 2011). Coleomegilla maculata is also listed for St. Martin by Nicolas (2012), probably based on Duverger (2001).

Cycloneda devestita (Mulsant, 1850): 299

[Aruba]

Cycloneda devestita: Oduber 2019: iNaturalist – Oranjestad, M. Oduber

Bonaire

Cycloneda devestita: This study – Rincón, JKW

[Curaçao]

Cycloneda devestita: Kruithof 2016: Observation.org – Sint Willibrordus, F. Cools

Cycloneda devestita: Kruithof 2018: Observation.org – Willemstad, F. Cools; Grote Berg, F. Cools

Cycloneda devestita: Louwsma 2018: iNaturalist – Christoffelpark, M. Louwsma

New species record for Bonaire.

Cycloneda sanguinea (Linnaeus, 1763): 10

Bonaire

Daulis sanguinea: Werner 1925: 556 – no locality, AG

Curaçao

Cycloneda sanguinea: Bennett & Simmonds 1964: 93 – without further data

[Saba]

Cycloneda sanguinea: Terpstra 2013a: Observation.org – Mount Scenery, M. Terpstra

Cycloneda sanguinea: Haber 2019: iNaturalist – The Bottom, E. Haber

St. Eustatius

Cycloneda sanguinea: This study – Knippinga Estate, THB; east coast, JTS; Oranjestad, AJW; Oranjestad, EOC

[St. Martin]

Cycloneda sanguinea: Duverger 2001: no pagination – without further data

New species record for St. Eustatius. Also listed for St. Martin by Nicolas (2012) probably based on Duverger (2001). A record from Barbuda on iNaturalist (Wisco 2016).

Psylloborva lineola (Fabricius, 1792b): 283

Saba

Psyllobora lineola: Bennett & Simmonds 1964: 94 – without further data

Psyllobora parvinotata Casey, 1899:101

[St. Martin]

Psyllobora parvinotata: Yokoyama 2013: 84 – without further data

Listed and photographed by Yokoyama (2013) and shown as present on St. Martin with reference to Yokoyama on the website of the INPN (2020). It is not clear if vouchers are available. This might be the previous species.

Family CORYLOPHIDAE LeConte, 1852a: 141

Ivie et al. (2009) listed six species of this family from Saba. Peck (2016) listed a single species which means that at least five, as yet unpublished, other species are present on the island.

Subfamily PELTINODINAE Paulian, 1950: 19

Holopsis Broun, 1883: 498

Saba

Holopsis species: Peck 2016: 147 – without further data

Listed erroneously as Holopsis pellucidus by Bos et al. (2018). Peck (2016) clearly listed an undetermined Holopsis species from Saba.

Family LATRIDIIDAE Erichson, 1842: 122

Ivie et al. (2009) listed one, as yet unpublished, species of this family from Saba.

Family MYCETOPHAGIDAE Leach, 1815: 110

Ivie et al. (2009) listed one, as yet unpublished, species of this family from Saba.

Typhaea stercorea (Linnaeus, 1758): 357

St. Eustatius

Typhaea stercorea: This study – Oranjestad, EOC

Introduced. New species record for St. Eustatius. Collected with a yellow pan trap.

Family CIIDAE Leach, 1819b: 206

Ivie et al. (2009) listed three species of this family from Saba. Peck (2016) mentioned unidentified material of the genus Cis from the same island.

Subfamily CIINAE Leach, 1819b: 206

Cis Latreille, 1796: 50

Saba

Cis species: Peck 2016: 149 – without further data

Cis creberrimus Mellié, 1849: 357

St. Eustatius

Cis cf. creberrimus: This study – Oranjestad Bay, EOC

Collected from a tree fungus together with Cis melliei and on the same tree as Palorus cerylonoides. It keyed out as C. creberrimus in Lawrence (1971). CO1 barcoding yielded a relatively low match of 88% with a Brazilian specimen of that species in GenBank (Benson et al. 2005). Lawrence (1971) already noted that C. creberrimus is probably a species complex. For the year of publication see Evenhuis (2016).

Cis melliei Coquerel, 1850: 441

St. Eustatius

Cis melliei: This study – Oranjestad Bay, EOC

Collected from a tree fungus together with Cis creberrimus and on the same tree as Palorus cerylonoides. For the year of publication see Evenhuis (2016).

Family MORDELLIDAE Latreille, 1802: 183

Ivie et al. (2009) listed one, as yet unpublished, species of this family from Saba.

Subfamily MORDELLINAE Latreille, 1802: 183

Glipostenoda pallida (Champion, 1896a): 50

St. Eustatius

Glipostenoda pallida: This study – The Quill, EOC; The Quill, JTS

Beaten from vegetation and caught in a Malaise trap.

Family COLYDIIDAE Billberg, 1820b: 394

Ivie et al. (2009) listed five, as yet unpublished, species of this family from Saba.

Family TENEBRIONIDAE Latreille, 1802: 165

Ivie et al. (2009) listed 12 species of this family from Saba. The present paper contains information on four species. Ivie and Hart (2016) and Hart and Ivie (2016) revised the species of the subfamily Opatrinae. The latter papers reduced the total number of species present on Saba with two. This means that at least six, as yet unpublished, other species are present on the island.

Subfamily LAGRIINAE Latreille, 1825: 381

Rhypasma mariagratiae Marcuzzi, 1953: 80

Bonaire

Rhypasma mariagratiae Marcuzzi, 1953: 80 – Rooi Onima, PWH

Rhypasma mariagratiae: Marcuzzi 1954: 8 – same as above

Curaçao

Rhypasma mariagratiae: Marcuzzi 1959: 83 – Jongbloed, BJ

Rhypasma venezuelense Marcuzzi, 1953: 76

[Bonaire]

Rhypasma venezuelense Marcuzzi, 1953: 76 – Tanki Onima, PWH

Rhypasma venezuelense: Marcuzzi 1954: 7 – same as above

Rhypasma venezuelense: Marcuzzi 1977: 10 – Escarpment of Fontein, PWH

Without clarification, Marcuzzi (1984) listed only Rhypasma mariagratiae for Bonaire and placed a question mark for the occurrence of R. venezuelense on Bonaire. This could mean that he considered his earlier identifications erroneous. The genus Rhypasma was recently transferred from the subfamily Pimeliinae to Lagriinae by Nabozhenko et al. (2016).

Subfamily PIMELIINAE Latreille, 1802: 166

Ecnomosternum vermiculatum Gebien, 1928: 104

Bonaire

Ecnomosternum vermiculatum Werner 1925: 556 (nomen nudum) – no locality, AG

Ecnomosternum vermiculatum Gebien, 1928: 104 – without further data

Ecnomosternum vermiculatum: Marcuzzi 1959: 81 – Fontein, PWH; Hofje Fontein, HJMG; Dos Pos, HJMG; Pos Hoeba, no leg.; Playa Grandi, Tanki Ventura, HJMG; no locality, RHC

Ecnomosternum vermiculatum: Freude 1967: 221 – without further data

Curaçao

Ecnomosternum vermiculatum Werner 1925: 556 (nomen nudum) – no locality, without further data

Ecnomosternum vermiculatum Gebien, 1928: 104 – without further data

Ecnomosternum vermiculatum: Marcuzzi 1954: 2 – Piscadera Hotel, no leg.; Cas Cord, no leg.; Willemstad, no leg.)

Ecnomosternum vermiculatum: Marcuzzi 1959: 81 – Hofje Porto Marie, HJMG; Porto Marie, HJMG; Hofje Sint Kruis, HJMG; Scherpenheuvel, BMR; Jongbloed, BJ; Santa Marta, RHC

Ecnomosternum vermiculatum: Freude 1967: 221 – without further data

Ecnomosternum vermiculatum: Marcuzzi 1977: 5 – CARMABI, Piscadera Baai, PWH

For unknown reasons Marcuzzi (1984) listed Ecnomosternum vermiculatum only for Curaçao.

Epitragus aurulentus Kirsch, 1866: 189

Aruba

Epitragus aurulentus: Marcuzzi 1959: 81 – Eagle Colony, RHC

Epitragus aurulentus: Marcuzzi 1961a: 318 – no locality, PWH

Epitragus aurulentus: Rigatti-Luchini & Camuffo 1962: 92 – no locality, PWH

Epitragus aurulentus: Marcuzzi 1962: 24 – Eagle Colony, no leg.

Curaçao

Epitragus aurulentus: Marcuzzi 1959: 81 – Jongbloed, BJ; Jongbloed, BJ; Santa Marta, RHC

Epitragus hummelincki Marcuzzi, 1961b: 22

Aruba

Epitragus hummelincki Marcuzzi, 1961b: 22 no locality, PWH; Savaneta, JGB

Epitragus hummelincki: Marcuzzi 1961a: 322 – same as above

Epitragus hummelincki: Marcuzzi 1977: 5 – Bubali, no leg.; Bubali, PWH

Stictoderia gridelli Marcuzzi, 1954: 6

Aruba

Stictoderia gridelli Marcuzzi, 1954: 6 – Reef of Bucuti, PWH; Vader Piet, PWH; near Fontein, PWH

Endemic to Aruba.

Stictoderia subseriata Gebien, 1928: 101

Bonaire

Stictoderia werneri: Werner 1925: 556 (nomen nudum) – no locality, AG

Stictoderia werneri Gebien, 1928: 102 – no locality, F. Werner [erroneous, leg. should be AG]

Stictoderia subseriata: Marcuzzi 1954: 5 – near Spelonk, PWH; Onima, PWH; Slagbaai, PWH; Klein Bonaire, SE, PWH

Stictoderia subseriata: Marcuzzi 1959: Kibra Guarati, HJMG; Hofje Fontein, HJMG; Dos Pos, HJMG; Braziel, HJMG; Lagoen, no leg.; Lima, RHC

Stictoderia subseriata Marcuzzi 1977: 5 – Klein Bonaire, N shore, PWH, Paya Wecua, PWH; near Salinja, PWH; Ceru Pretu, Washington, PWH; Shishiribana, Washington, PWH; Rooi Tuna, Bolivia, PWH; Landhuis Boven Bolivia, PWH; Rooi Caohori, Bolivia, PWH; Washington gate, PWH

Curaçao

Stictoderia subseriata Werner 1925: 556 (nomen nudum) – without further data

Stictoderia subseriata Gebien, 1928: 101 – without further data

Stictoderia subseriata: Marcuzzi 1954: 5 – Klein Curaçao, PWH; Tafelberg S. Barbara, PWH

Stictoderia subseriata: Marcuzzi 1959: Boca Santa Marta, no leg.

Stictoderia subseriata Marcuzzi 1977: 5 – Seroe Cabajé, Porto Marie, PWH; coast of Klein St. Joris, PWH

Tapinocomus subnudus Gebien, 1928: 103

Aruba

Tapinocomus subnudus: Marcuzzi 1954: 4 – Hooiberg, PWH; Hudishibana, PWH; Tibushi, PWH; Oranjestad, Pasanggrahan, no leg.; Santa Cruz, PWH; Hooiberg, PWH; Baranca Alto, PWH; Root Prins, PWH; Rooi Spoki, PWH; Cave of Quadirikiri, PWH; Vader Piet, PWH; Fontein, PWH; Jamanota, Seroe Cristal, PWH; Seroe Plat, PWH; Oranjestad, ADR; Dakota Airport, ADR; San Michael, NW of Oranjestad, no leg.

Tapinocomus subnudus: Marcuzzi 1959: 82 – San Barbola-Seroe Patrishi, HJMG; Altovista, HJMG; Macuarina-Warawara, HJMG; Oranjestad, HJMG; Westpunt-Malmok, HJMG; Santa Lucia-Andicuri, HJMG; Fontein, HJMG; Vader Piet-Seroe Kadushi, HJMG; Eagle Colony, no leg.; Seroe Colorado, PWH; Vader Piet, no leg.; Eagle Petroleum Company, PWH; no locality, RHC

Tapinocomus subnudus: Marcuzzi 1962: 24 – Oranjestad, ADR; Seroe Colorado, PWH

Tapinocomus subnudus: Marcuzzi 1977: 5 – Eagle Petroleum Company, PWH

Bonaire

Tapinocomus subnudus Werner 1925: 556 (nomen nudum) – no locality, AG

Tapinocomus subnudus Gebien, 1928: 103 – no locality, AG

Tapinocomus subnudus: Marcuzzi 1954: 4 – Kralendijk, no leg.; Lagoen, PWH,

Tapinocomus subnudus: Marcuzzi 1959: 82 – Bolivia, HJMG; Kralendijk, no leg.; no locality, RHC

Tapinocomus subnudus: Marcuzzi 1962: 24 – Bolivia, PWH

Tapinocomus subnudus: Marcuzzi 1977: 5 – Ceru Pretu, Washington, PWH; Shishiribana, Washington, PWH; Rooi Tuna, Bolivia, PWH; Landhuis boven Bolivia, PWH

Tapinocomus subnudus:This study – Rincón, JKW

Curaçao

Tapinocomus subnudus: Marcuzzi 1954: 4 – Oost Seinpost, PWH; Willemstad, no leg.; Seroe Djerimi, PWH

Tapinocomus subnudus: Marcuzzi 1977: 5 – Seroe Rondo, near Hato airport, PWH; Fort Waakzaamheid, Otrabanda, PWH

Tapinocomus subnudus: Marcuzzi 1983: 243 – without further data

Trientoma guadeloupensis Fleutiaux & Sallé, 1890: 421

St. Eustatius

Trientoma guadeloupensis: Marcuzzi 1962: 25 – Northeast of Oranjestad, PWH; base of White Wall, PWH; top of White Wall, PWH; Quill above White Wall, PWH; Toby Gut, PWH

Trientoma guadeloupensis: Marcuzzi 1977: 6 – Sugar Loaf Gut, PWH

Trientoma guadeloupensis: This study – Boven National Park, AJW

Subfamily DIAPERINAE Latreille, 1802: 161

Adelina pici (Ardoin, 1977): 7

St. Eustatius

Adelina pici: This study – Botanical Garden, EOC

New species record for St. Eustatius. Collected from under bark. Listed for Antigua by Chalumeau (1982: 194), an island not mentioned by Peck (2011, 2016).

Phaleria fulva Fleutiaux & Sallé, 1890: 423

St. Eustatius

Phaleria fulva: This study – Concordia Bay, JB

St. Martin

Phaleria fulva: Triplehorn 1980 – Simpson Bay, JFGC

Phaleria fulva: Watrous & Triplehorn 1982: 17 – without further data, probably same as above

Phaleria fulva: Johnson & Cora 2020: GBIF – same as first

New species record for St. Eustatius. Collected from washed-up beach material.

Phaleria picipes Say, 1824: 280

St. Eustatius

Phaleria picipes: This study – Concordia Bay, JB

St. Martin

Phaleria picipes: Watrous & Triplehorn 1982: 20 – no locality, FC

New species record for St. Eustatius. Collected from washed-up beach material.

Phaleria punctipes LeConte, 1878: 421

St. Martin

Phaleria guadeloupensis: Marcuzzi & d’Aguilar 1971: 83 – Baie aux Cailles, no leg.

Phaleria punctipes: Soldati & Touroult 2014: 95 – Baie aux Cailles, no leg.

Triplehorn & Watrous (1979: 283) added Anguilla (Sandy Island) and Barbuda to the range as published by Peck (2011, 2016).

Phaleria testacea Say, 1824: 280

St. Eustatius

Phaleria maculipennis: Marcuzzi 1962: 37 – Concordia Bay, PWH

Phaleria maculipennis: Marcuzzi 1977: 36 – Concordia Bay, PWH

Phaleria testacea: This study – Concordia Bay, JB; Concordia Bay, EOC

St. Martin

Phaleria angustata: Marcuzzi & d’Aguilar 1971: 83 – Baie aux Cailles, no leg.

Phaleria chevrolati: Marcuzzi 1977: 35 – Îlet Pinel, PWH

Phaleria testacea: Triplehorn & Watrous 1979: 289 – without further data

Triplehorn & Watrous (1979: 291) added Barbuda, Antigua and Montserrat to the range as published by Peck (2011, 2016).

Phaleria Latreille, 1802: 162

Aruba

Phaleria cadaverina: Kleefstra 2019: Obervation.org – beach Oranjestad, N. Kleefstra

A photo on the citizen-science website Observation.org shows a Phaleria species erroneously identified as the European species cadaverina.

Trachyscelis aphodioides Latreille, 1809: 379

St. Eustatius

Trachyscelis aphodioides: This study – Concordia Bay, EOC

St. Martin

Trachyscelis flavipes: Marcuzzi & d’Aguilar 1971: 83 – Baie aux Cailles, no leg.

Trachyscelis aphodioides: Soldati & Touroult 2014: 93 – Baie aux Cailles, no leg.

New species record for St. Eustatius. Collected from sandy beach under algae. Introduced from the Mediterranean area, Europe.

Ulomoides ocularis (Casey, 1891): 65

St. Martin

Ulomoides ocularis: Chalumeau 1982: 193 – Colombier and Pic Paradis, FC

Subfamily OPATRINAE Brullé, 1832: 213

In two comprehensive papers Hart & Ivie (2016) and Ivie & Hart (2016) shed a large amount of light on the confusing taxonomy of this subfamily in the Antilles.

Blapstinus buqueti Champion, 1885: 128

Aruba

Blapstinus buqueti: Marcuzzi 1954: 12 – Hofje Westpunt, PWH; Solito, PWH

Blapstinus buqueti: Marcuzzi 1977: 26 – Eagle Petroleum Company, Druif, PWH

Bonaire

Blapstinus buqueti: Marcuzzi 1959: 84 – Hofje Fontein, HJMG; Hofje St. Kruis, HJMG; Hofje Savonet, HJMG; no locality, RHC

Curaçao

Blapstinus buqueti: Marcuzzi 1954: 12 – Hofje Hato, PWH; Hofje Groot Piscadera, PWH

Blapstinus buqueti: Marcuzzi 1959: 84 – Hofje Porto Marie, HJMG; Mahaai, BJ; Santa Marta, RHC

Blapstinus buqueti: Marcuzzi 1977: 26 – Hato, ADR; S of San Pedro, PWH

Blapstinus curassavicus Marcuzzi, 1954: 14

Bonaire

Blapstinus curassavicus Marcuzzi, 1954: 14 – Deenterra, PWH; Bronswinkel, PWH; Lagoen, PWH; Boca Onima, PWH; Klein Bonaire, near Cas, PWH

Blapstinus curassavicus: Marcuzzi 1959: 85 – Kibra Guarati, HJMG; no locality, HJMG; Playa Grandi, Tanki Ventura, HJMG; Bolivia, HJMG; Klein Bonaire, HJMG; Hofje Fontein, Spelonk, PWH; Klein Bonaire, RHC

Blapstinus curassavicus: Marcuzzi 1977: 26 – Montagne, W of Curuburu, PWH; Landhuis Guatemala, PWH; Seroe Ventana, Washington, PWH; Ceru Matijs, Washington, PWH; near Ceru Pretu, Washington, PWH; S Bolivia near Rooi Caohori, PWH; Playa Wecua, PWH

Blapstinus curassavicus: Marcuzzi 1987: 101 – without further data

Curaçao

Blapstinus curassavicus Marcuzzi, 1954: 14 – Seroe Preioe, PWH; Kleine Berg, PWH; Martha Koosje, PWH; Plaja Djerimi, PWH; Seroe Baha So, PWH

Blapstinus curassavicus: Marcuzzi 1959: 85 – Hofje Porto Marie, HJMG; Cas Abau, HJMG; Seroe Cabajé, HJMG; Seroe di Cueba, HJMG; Playa Frankie, Spaanse Put, PWH; Boca Santa Marta, no leg.; Parera, no leg.

Blapstinus curassavicus: Marcuzzi 1977: 26 – Seroe Stela, St. Jorisbaai, PWH; Spaanse Put near Playa Frankie, PWH; Seroe Patfa, Fuik, PWH; Seroe Cabajé, Porto Marie, PWH; Seroe Blanco, Fuik, PWH; Piscadera Baai, PWH; E of Boca Santa Marie, PWH; Piscadera, N part CARMABI area, PWH; Pestbaai, PWH; San Pedro, PWH; S of San Pedro, PWH; Ceru di Boca, Santa Martha, PWH; Ceru Rondo, E of Hato, no leg.; Put Klein St. Joris, PWH; no locality, PWH; Peninsula in inner bay of Santa Martha, PWH

Blapstinus hummelincki Marcuzzi, 1954: 17

Bonaire

Blapstinus hummelincki Marcuzzi, 1954: 17 – E of Punt Vierkant, PWH; Boca Onima, PWH

Blapstinus hummelincki: Marcuzzi 1977: 27 – Boca Onima, E, PWH; Klein Bonaire, N part, PWH; Montagne, W of Curuburu, PWH; Playa Wectia, PWH; NE Salinja Matijs, Washington, PWH

Curaçao

Blapstinus hummelincki Marcuzzi, 1954: 17 – Seroe Pretoe, PWH; Schaarloo, PWH; Seroe Djerimi, PWH; Martha Koosje, PWH; NW. slope of S. Christoffel, PWH; Top of Seroe Christoffel, PWH; Seroe Baha So, PWH; Tafelberg S. Barbara, PWH

Blapstinus hummelincki: Marcuzzi 1977: 27 – Seroe Stela, St. Jorisbaai, PWH; Seroe Patla, Fuik, PWH; Boca Grandi, E, Savonet, PWH; Boca Grandi, W, PWH; Seroe Cabajé, Porto Marie, PWH; Seroe Pretoe, Fuik, PWH; Hofje St. Kruis, PWH; Piscadera, N part CARMABI area, PWH; Pestbaai, PWH; Ceru Rondó, E of Hato, PWH

Blapstinus opacus Mulsant & Rey, 1859: 122

St. Eustatius

Clapstinus opacus: Marcuzzi 1957: 129 – without further data

Blapstinus opacus: Marcuzzi 1962: 36 – East of Oranjestad, PWH

Blapstinus opacus: This study – botanical Garden, EOC; Oranjestad, EOC; Zeelandia, JTS; Oranjestad, AJW

St. Martin

Blapstinus opacus: Marcuzzi 1962: 36 – Tintamarre, PWH

Blapstinus opacus martinensis Marcuzzi, 1977: 29 – Grand Case, PWH

Also present on Antigua (Marcuzzi 1957: 129, Ivie & Hart 2016: 466), an island not listed by Peck (2011, 2016).

Blapstinus orchilensis Marcuzzi, 1951: 74

Aruba

Blapstinus orchilensis occidentalis Marcuzzi, 1954: 15 – Seroe Canashito, PWH; Heintje Croes, PWH; Solito, PWH; Reef of Bucuti, PWH; Vader Piet, PWH; Seroe Cristal, PWH; Seroe Plat, PWH; Hofje Fontein, PWH; Bucuti, PWH

Blapstinus orchilensis occidentalis: Marcuzzi 1959: 86 – no locality, HJMG; no locality, RHC

Blapstinus orchilensis occidentalis: Marcuzzi 1977: 30 – Eagle Petroleum Company, PWH

Bonaire

Blapstinus orchilensis occidentalis Marcuzzi, 1954: 15 – Tanki Onima, PWH; Bronswinkel, PWH; Fontein, PWH; Hofje Fontein, PWH; near Pos Dominica, PWH; Rooi Onima, PWH; Boca Onima, PWH

Blapstinus orchilensis occidentalis: Marcuzzi 1959: 86 – Kibra Guarati, HJMG; Hofje Fontein, HJMG; Dos Pos, HJMG; no locality, RHC

Blapstinus orchilensis occidentalis: Marcuzzi 1977: 30 – Hofje Fontein, PWH; Klein Bonaire, NW part., PWH; Playa Wecua, PWH; Ceru Matijs, Washington, PWH; Hofje Bronswinkel, Washington, PWH

Blapstinus orchilensis occidentalis: Marcuzzi 1987: 100 – without further data

Curaçao

Blapstinus orchilensis occidentalis Marcuzzi, 1954: 15 – N of Tafelberg S. Barbara, PWH; Hofje Halo, PWH; Hofje St. Kruis, PWH; Rooi Cajoeda, PWH; Hofje Groot S. Martha, PWH; Hofje Groot Piscadera, PWH; Seroe Baha So, PWH; Hofje Groot St. Joris, PWH

Blapstinus orchilensis occidentalis: Marcuzzi 1959: 86 – Hofje St. Kruis, PWH

Blapstinus orchilensis occidentalis: Marcuzzi 1977: 30 – Top of Seroe Commandant, St. Kruis, PWH; Boca Grandi, W, Savonet, PWH; Hofje St. Kruis, PWH; Piscadera, N part CARMABI area, PWH; Hato, near Wandongo, PWH; Westpunt Baai, PWH; Ceru Rondo, E of Hato, PWH; Seroe di Boca, Klein St. Joris, PWH

Diastolinus leewardensis Hart & Ivie, 2016: 498

Saba

Diastolinus puncticollis: Marcuzzi 1957: 128 – without further data

Diastolinus puncticollis: Marcuzzi 1962: 26 – Road to Bottom, PWH

Diastolinus puncticollis: Marcuzzi 1977: 22 – The Level, Windwardside, PWH; Road to Bottom, PWH; Tom’s Gut, S of Rendez-Vous, PWH

Diastolinus sallei: Marcuzzi 1977: 22 – The Level, Windwardside, PWH

Diastolinus puncticollis: Marcuzzi 1983: 244 – The Level, no leg.; Bottom, no leg.

Diastolinus leewardensis Hart & Ivie, 2016: 498 – Windwardside, RSM; Fort Bay Gut, RSM; Hells Gate, RSM; Hotel Scout’s Place, Windwardside, DSS; Mount Scenery Trail, DSS; beach Giles Quarter Trail, JAS; Dancing Place Trail, DSS & JAS; Boobie Hill, JAS; near Boobie Hill, DSS & JAS; near Boobie Hill, DSS & JAS; Dancing Place Trail, MAI; Mountain Road, MPTG

Diastolinus leewardensis: Johnson & Cora 2020: GBIF Windwardside, RSM; Fort Bay Gut, RSM

St. Eustatius

Diastolinus puncticollis: Marcuzzi 1957: 128 – without further data

Diastolinus puncticollis: Marcuzzi 1962: 26 – East of Oranjestad, PWH; Toby Gut near Quill, PWH; Big Gut near White Wall, PWH; The Quill above White Wall, PWH; The Quill above Glass Bottle, PWH

Diastolinus leewardensis Hart & Ivie, 2016: 498 – Glass Bottle, PWH; Venus Bay, MAI & N. Esteban; The Quill, MAI

Diastolinus leewardensis: This study – Botanical Garden, EOC; Botanical Garden, KB; The Quill, AJW; Oranjestad, AJW; Oranjestad, EOC

Collected during this study from under stones, by beating and at light.

Diastolinus perforatus (Schönherr, 1806 ): 146

St. Martin

Diastolinus clathratus: Marcuzzi 1957: 128 – without further data

Diastolinus perforatus: Marcuzzi 1957: 128 – without further data

Diastolinus clathratus: Marcuzzi 1962: 27 – Old Battery, east of Great Bay, PWH

Diastolinus perforatus: Marcuzzi 1962: 27 – Old Battery Hill, PWH; Point Blanche, PWH; shore of Great Bay near Point Blanche, PWH; Old Battery, east of Great Bay, PWH; Cul de Sac bridge, PWH; Agricultural Experiment Station St. Peter, Cul de Sac, PWH; Experiment, east of Great Saltpond, PWH; Meschrine Hill near Simson Bay, PWH; Lowlands near Flamingo Pond, PWH; Little Key in Simson Bay lagoon, PWH; Pelican Key, Island, PWH; Little Bay Pond, PWH; Point Blanche Bay, PWH; Lowlands at Mullet Pond Bay, PWH; Sinkhole of Devil’s Hole Cave, PWH

Diastolinus clavatus: Marcuzzi 1977: 13 – Point Blanche Bay, PWH; Philipsburg, PWH

Diastolinus perforatus: Marcuzzi 1977: 19 – Old Battery, PWH; Colline Nettlé, PWH; Point Blanche Bay, PWH; Fort Willem, PWH; Point Blanche, PWH; N Point Blanche Bay, PWH; Backy Hill, Prince’s Quarter, PWH; Hope Hill, PWH; Belle Hill, N Grand Case, PWH; La Croisade, PWH; Morne aux Cabris, PWH; Cupecoy Bay Hill, PWH; Mildrum, Cul-de-Sac, PWH; Point Blanche, PWH; N of Cupecoy Bay, PWH; Grand Etang, PWH; Tintamarre, Bluff of Baie Blanche, PWH; W of Oysterpond, PWH; First Stick Hill, PWH; Cocksies, PWH; Guana Ridge, PWH

Diastolinus perforatus: Marcuzzi 1983: 246 – Mildrum, Cul de Sac, no leg.

Diastolinus clavatus: Marcuzzi 1987: 95 – Point Blanche, no leg.

Diastolinus clathratus: Marcuzzi 2001: 250 – Grande Case, Hope Estate, DB

Diastolinus mulsanti: Marcuzzi 2001: 251 – Grande Case, Hope Estate, DB

Diastolinus clathratus: Soldati & Touroult 2014: 99 – Grande Case, Hope Estate, DB

Diastolinus mulsanti: Soldati & Touroult 2014: 99 – Grande Case, Hope Estate, DB

Diastolinus perforatus: Hart & Ivie 2016: 501 – Old Fort Hill, JFGC; Marigot, HFH & FM; Point Blanche Bay, PWH; N of Cupecoy Bay, PWH; Mullet Bay, RSM; Pto. Blande, MAI & L.L. Ivie)

Diastolinus perforatus: Johnson & Cora 2020: GBIF – Mullet Bay, RSM

Goajiria curta (Mulsant & Rey, 1859): 93

Aruba

Diastolinus curtus curtus: Marcuzzi 1954: 8 – Tibushi, PWH; Heintje Croes, PWH; Man Plaisir, PWH; Solito, PWH; Hooiberg, PWH; Santa Cruz, PWH; Baranca Alto, PWH; Vader Piet, PWH; Seroe Cristal, PWH; Seroe Plat, PWH; Oranjestad, ADR; Sabana Blancoe, PWH; St. Michael, NW of Oranjestad, PWH

Diastolinus curtus curtus: Marcuzzi 1959: 83 – San Barbola-Seroe Patrishi, HJMG; Macuarina-Warawara, HJMG; Westpunt-Malmok, HJMG; Arikok, HJMG; Vader Piet-Seroe Kadushi, HJMG; Rooi Juditi-Piedra di Moelina, HJMG; Vader Piet, PWH; Seroe Colorado, PWH; Eagle Petroleum Company, PWH

Diastolinus curtus curtus: Marcuzzi 1977: 13 – Eagle Petroleum Company, PWH; Seroe Wara-Wara, PWH

Diastolinus curtus: Marcuzzi 1987: 97 – without further data

Bonaire

Diastolinus curtus curtus: Marcuzzi 1954: 8 – Bronswinkel, PWH

Curaçao

Diastolinus curtus Mulsant & Rey, 1859: 93 – no locality, AS

Diastolinus curtus curtus: Marcuzzi 1954: 8 – Koenoekoe Abau, PWH

Diastolinus curtus curtus: Marcuzzi 1959: 83 – Seroe Domi, PWH; Santa Maria-Hato, HJMG; Willemstad, BMR; Parera, Santa Marta, RHC

Diastolinus curtus curtus: Marcuzzi 1977: 13 – Fort Waakzaamheid, Otrabanda, PWH

Nevisia barbudensis (Marcuzzi, 1962): 29

Saba

Clapstinus barbudensis: Marcuzzi 1957: 129 (nomen nudum) – without further data

Diastolinus barbudensis Marcuzzi, 1962: 29 – road to The Bottom, PWH

Diastolinus barbudensis antiguanus: Marcuzzi 1977: 11 – road to The Bottom, PWH [other specimens than those listed above]

Ivie & Hart (2016) added Anguilla and St. Kitts to the range as published by Peck (2011, 2016).

Opatrinus clathratus ( Fabricius, 1787a): 379

St. Eustatius

Opatrinus clathratus: This study – The Quill, EOC; The Quill, AZ

[St. Martin]

Opatrinus clathratus: Peck 2011: 33 – without further data

Opatrinus clathratus: Peck 2016: 160 – without further data

New species record for St. Eustatius. Collected from under stones on a steep forested hill side. Except for some speculations in a report in The Agricultural News (Anonymous 1905 as Hopatrinus gemellatus), Peck (2011) was the first to list St. Martin for this species. Peck included Diastolinus clathratus Marcuzzi 1962: 27; 1977: 13; 1984: 77 and Marcuzzi & d’Aguilar 1971: 80 in the synonymy but these all belong to D. perforatus (see Hart & Ivie 2016). It is unclear whether Peck actually saw a specimen from St. Martin, or the island record is related to the historically very confusing use of the specific name clathratus in Opatrinae (Iwan 1995) and thus erroneous. Its occurrence on St. Martin seems not unlikely. Usually quoted as first described by Fabricius in 1792b: 90 but his 1787 publication contains (almost) the same description. Opatrinus clathratus is also mentioned for Anguilla in several reports in The Agricultural News (Anonymous 1904, 1905, 1910; all as H. gemellatus) and from St. Barthélemy by Questel (2018: 18).

Ulus hirsutus Champion, 1885: 133

Aruba

Ulus hirsutus Lumen et al. 2019: 832 – California Dunes near lighthouse, JMS & WES

Subfamily TENEBRIONINAE Latreille, 1802: 165

Alphitobius laevigatus ( Fabricius, 1781 ): 90

Aruba

Alphitobius laevigatus: Marcuzzi 1962: 24 – Eagle Colony, PWH

Alphitobius laevigatus: Marcuzzi 1977: 39 – Oranjestad, PWH; Tunnel of Love near Rincón, PWH

Curaçao

Alphitobius laevigatus: Marcuzzi 1954: 26 – Agricultural Experiment Station Cas Cord, PWH; Willemstad, PWH

Alphitobius laevigatus: Marcuzzi 1977: 39 – Cueba di Noordkant, PWH

Saba

Alphitobius laevigatus: Marcuzzi 1962: 38 – Bat Hole, PWH

St. Martin

Alphitobius laevigatus: Marcuzzi 1962: 38 – Devil’s Hole, PWH; no locality, RHC

Alphitobius laevigatus: Marcuzzi 1977: 39 – Devil’s Hole, PWH; Philipsburg school, PWH

Hypogena biimpressa (Latreille, 1813): 17

[Curaçao]

Ulosonia biimpressa: Marcuzzi 1977: 41 – CARMABI, Piscadera Baai, PWH

The year of publication of this species is often cited as 1833. However, the second volume of von Humboldt & Bonpland’s “Recueil d’observations de zoologie et d’anatomie comparée faites dans l’océan Atlantique”, in which Latreille’s descriptions were published, was issued in seven livraisons (8–14, in 1813–1832). Tenebrio biimpressus was published on page 17 of the eighth livraison, which was issued in 1813 (Mac Gillavry 1931, Bousquet 2016). Based on the erroneous citation, Grimm et al. (2018) synonymised Hypogena biimpressa with H. brasilica (Perty, 1830). However, because Latreille’s name was published 17 years earlier it should stand as the valid name of this species.

Grey & Smith (2020) recently revised Hypogena and designated a neotype for H. biimpressa. They did not list this species nor H. tricornis for Curaçao but described the new species below from, among others, specimens from the island. It is as yet unclear whether H. biimpressa is also part of the fauna of Curaçao.

Hypogena hirsuta Grey & Smith, 2020: 238

Curaçao

Hypogena hirsuta Grey & Smith, 2020: 238 – Savonet, JMS & WES; SE Lagun, WES, RHT & MCT

Hypogena tricornis (Dalman, 1823): 59

[Curaçao]

Ulosonia tricornis: Marcuzzi 1954: 26 – no locality, PWH

There are no vouchers for Curaçao. Marcuzzi himself reported that the specimens collected by Wagenaar Hummelinck were lost. Spilman (1973) clarified some nomenclatural problems with the genera Hypogena and Ulosonia. Bousquet & Bouchard (2013) stated that Hypogena tricornis Palisot de Beauvois, 1834: 199 from North America is not the same as Phaleria tricornis Dalman, 1823 from Jamaica as was mentioned by Spilman. This would make H. tricornis Palisot de Beauvois, 1834 a nomen nudum.

Marcuzzi (1954) first referred his Curaçao specimens to the concept of Laporte (1840) who mentioned Palisot de Beauvois as the author but later listed them as Ulosonia tricornis (Dalman, 1823) in his catalogue of the West Indies (1984). Bousquet et al. (2018) considered the names of Laporte and Dalman different nomenclatural acts which are probably synonymous. Grey & Smith (2020) did list the paper by Bousquet et al. but did not comment on the issue. They did not list this species nor H. biimpressa for Curaçao but described the new species above from, among others, specimens from the island. It is unclear whether H. tricornis is also part of the fauna of Curaçao.

Palorus cerylonoides (Pascoe, 1863): 129

St. Eustatius

Palorus cerylonoides: This study – Oranjestad Bay, EOC

Introduced. New species record for St. Eustatius. Collected from under bark on the same tree as the tree fungus with Cis cf. creberrimus and C. melliei.

Platydema Laporte & Brullé, 1831: 350

Curaçao

Platydema species: Marcuzzi 1959: 87 – Hofje St. Kruis, HJMG; Hofje St. Kruis, PWH

Tribolium castaneum (Herbst, 1797): 282

Curaçao

Tribolium castaneum: Marcuzzi 1954: 26 – Willemstad, no leg.

Tribolium castaneum: Marcuzzi 1959: 87 – same as above

Tribolium confusum Jacquelin du Val, 1862: 181

Aruba

Tribolium confusum: Marcuzzi 1959: 87 – Fontein, HJMG; no locality, HJMG

This species was not described in the fourth part of Jacquelin de Val’s “Genera des coléoptères d’Europe”, as quoted by Blackwelder (1945), but in the Catalogue of the series which was issued with separate pagination. See further Bousquet (2016) for the year of publication.

Trichoton curvipes Champion, 1885: 136

Curaçao

Trichoton curvipes: Marcuzzi 1959: 86 – Hofje Savonet, HJMG; Playa Frankie, Spaanse Put, PWH

Trichoton curvipes: Marcuzzi 1977: 33 – Spaanse Put near Playa Frankie, PWH; Top Seroe Commandant, St. Kruis, PWH; Boca Grandi, E cliff, Savonet, PWH

Trichoton curvipes: Ferrer & Moraguès 2001: 506 – “Pla 560” [should be Sta. 560 = Spaanse Put near Playa Frankie], PWH

Zophobas atratus (Fabricius, 1775): 256

Aruba

Zophobas cf. atratus: Marcuzzi 1954: 27 – Oranjestad, no leg.

Zophobas rugipes: Marcuzzi 1959: 87 – Oranjestad, PWH

Zophobas batavorum Marcuzzi, 1959: 88 – Fontein, HJMG

Zophobas atratus: Marcuzzi 1959: 90 – Oranjestad, no leg.

Zophobas rugipes: Marcuzzi 1962: 24 – San Nicolas, JGB; specimen without further data

Zophobas batavorum: Marcuzzi 1977: 42 – Oranjestad, PWH

Zophobas rugipes: Marcuzzi 1977: 42 – Oranjestad, PWH

Zophobas atratus: Ferrer 2011: 297 – without further data

Bonaire

Zophobas cf. atratus: Werner 1925: 556 – no locality, AG

Zophobas species: Marcuzzi 1954: 27 – Fontein, PWH; Hofje Fontein, PWH; Boca Onima, PWH

Zophobas batavorum Marcuzzi, 1959: 88 – Playa Grandi – Tanki Ventura, HJMG; Fontein, PWH; Hofje Fontein, PWH; Boca Onima, PWH; no locality, RHC

Zophobas batavorum: Marcuzzi 1977: 42 – Hofje Fontein, PWH; Landhuis Bacuna, PWH

Zophobas batavorum: Marcuzzi 1987: 108 – without further data

Zophobas atratus: Ferrer 2011: 297 – without further data

Curaçao

Zophobas cf. rugipes: Marcuzzi 1954: 27 – Willemstad, no leg.; Groot Piscadera, PWH

Zophobas rugipes: Marcuzzi 1959: 87 – Willemstad, BMR; Willemstad, no leg.; Groot Piscadera, PWH

Zophobas batavorum Marcuzzi, 1959: 88 – Newport Santa Barbara, PWH; Tafelberg Santa Barbara, PWH; Piscadera Bay, no leg.; Santa Marta, no leg.; Santa Marta, RHC

Zophobas rugipes: Marcuzzi 1962: 24 – Willemstad, no leg.

Zophobas batavorum: Marcuzzi 1962: 24 – Willemstad, no leg.

Zophobas batavorum: Marcuzzi 1977: 42 – Top of Seroe Commandant, St. Kruis, PWH; Hato, W of airport, PWH

Zophobas atratus: Ferrer 2011: 297 – station 207 [= Newport, near Cave, Sta Barbara], PWH

Zophobas atratus: This study – Suffisant, RK

Saba

Zophobas rugipes: Marcuzzi 1962: 39 – Bottom, in house, no leg.; Windwardside, RHC

St. Eustatius

Zophobas atratus: This study – Oranjestad, AJW

St. Martin

Zophobas rugipes: Marcuzzi 1962: 39 – St. Peter, Cul de Sac, PWH; Cul de Sac bridge, PWH

Zophobas batavorum: Marcuzzi 1977: 42 – Agricultural Experiment Station St. Peter, PWH

Zophobas atratus: Marcuzzi 1987: 108 – Mildrum, no leg.

Zophobas atratus: Ferrer 2011: 297 – no locality, E. Polvent [ambiguously listed as “Guadalupe, Saint Martin”. Before 2007 St. Martin was part of the département of Guadeloupe]

Zophobas atratus: Soldati & Touroult 2014: 103 – Oyster Pond, CD

New species record for St. Eustatius. Collected from an urban site littered with dog faeces and household waste.

Subfamily ALLECULINAE Laporte, 1840: 242

Lobopoda Solier, 1835b: 233

St. Eustatius

Lobopoda species: This study – The Quill, EOC

Two female and one male specimens were collected from under stones. The male genitalia do not match any of those published by Campbell (1971).

Family OEDEMERIDAE Latreille, 1810: 216

Ivie et al. (2009) listed one, as yet unpublished, species of this family from Saba.

Family SALPINGIDAE Leach, 1815: 106

Ivie et al. (2009) listed three, as yet unpublished, species of this family from Saba.

Family ANTHICIDAE Latreille, 1819: 363

Subfamily ANTHICINAE Latreille, 1819: 363

Acanthinus trifasciatus (Fabricius, 1801b): 291

Aruba

Anthicus laterotuberculatus: Buck, 1960: 67 – Fontein, HJMG

Acanthinus trifasciatus: Werner 1966: 1272 – same specimens as above but erroneously listed with Fontein as leg. instead of as locality

Bonaire

Anthicus laterotuberculatus: Buck, 1960: 67 – Fontein, HJMG

Acanthinus trifasciatus: Werner 1966: 1272 – same specimens as above but erroneously listed with Fontein as leg. instead of as locality

Curaçao

Anthicus laterotuberculatus: Buck, 1960: 67 – Porto Marie, HJMG

Acanthinus trifasciatus: Werner 1966: 1272 – same specimens as above but erroneously listed with Fontein as leg.

Bonadona (1981: 284) listed a specimen from St. Barthélemy, an island not mentioned by Peck (2011, 2016). Not endemic to the ABC islands as listed (as Anthicus laterotuberculatus) by Debrot (2006).

Subfamily incertae sedis

Atenizoides curacaoae Gilmour, 1968: 103

Curaçao

Atenizoides curacaoae Gilmour, 1968: 103 – Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, RHC

Atenizoides curacaoae: Philips & Ivie 1989: 162 – same specimen as above

Gilmour (1968) described this genus and species as a member of the Cerambycidae. Philipps & Ivie (1989) transferred it to the family Anthicidae. Endemic to Curaçao.

Family ADERIDAE Csiki, 1909: 5

Csiki (1909) published this name on page 5, not 6 as listed in Bouchard et al. (2011). Ivie et al. (2009) listed four, as yet unpublished, species of this family from Saba.

Ganascus Casey, 1895: 774

St. Eustatius

Ganascus species: This study – Botanical Garden, KB; The Quill, KB; The Quill, JTS

New genus record for St. Eustatius. Collected at light and in Malaise trap.

Family SCRAPTIIDAE Gistel, 1848b: [11]

Subfamily ANASPIDINAE Mulsant, 1856: 85

Anaspis Geoffroy, 1762: 315

Saba

Anaspis species: Peck 2016: 170 – without further data

Family CERAMBYCIDAE Latreille, 1802: 211

Ivie et al. (2009) listed 13 species of this family from Saba. The present paper contains information on 12 which means that at least one, as yet unpublished, other species is present on the island.

Subfamily PRIONINAE Latreille, 1802: 212

Hovorodon maxillosum (Drury, 1773): 133

St. Martin

Stenodontes maxillosus: Lameere 1902: 97 – without further data

Nothopleurus maxillosus: Villiers 1980b: 141 – Cul-de-Sac, AD

Nothopleurus maxillosus: Chalumeau & Touroult 2005: 45 – Concordia, DE

Hovorodon maxillosum: Touroult 2019b: GBIF – no locality, M. Yokoyama

The ICZN (1957) ruled in Opinion 474 that the date of publication of the index, published with the second volume of Drury’s “Illustrations of natural history” in 1773, contains names formed in accordance with the principles of binominal nomenclature, and as such is the official date of publication of the species described in the first and second volume (Bousquet 2016). See further Santos-Silva et al. (2010) for the page number. Peck (2016) listed Nevis, probably based on Santos-Silva et al. (2010). It is certainly possible that this species is present there. However, Santos-Silva et al. (2010) referred to Gahan (1895) for their Nevis record but there is no record for that island there. Gahan (1895) only listed Guadeloupe, Barbuda and St. Kitts (as St. Christophers).

Mallodon spinibarbe (Linnaeus, 1758): 390

Aruba

Stenodontes (Mallodon) spinibarbis: Gilmour 1968: 87 – Oranjestad, PWH

[Bonaire]

Stenodontes spinibarbis: Sieben 2016: Observation.org – Dos Pos, H. Sieben

Curaçao

Stenodontes (Mallodon) spinibarbis : Gilmour 1968: 87 – Agricultural Station, BAB; Agricultural Station, ACJB; Groot Piscadera, PWH; Hato, ADR; Jongbloed, BJ; Julianadorp, Y

Mallodon spinibarbe: This study – Jongbloed, BJ; Suffisant, RK

Solenoptera chalumeaui Villiers, 1979a: 23

St. Martin

Solenoptera chalumeaui Villiers, 1979a: 23 – Pic Paradis, FC

Solenoptera chalumeaui: Villiers 1980b: 148 – same as above

Solenoptera chalumeaui: Galileo & Martins 1993: 433 – no locality, HER

Solenoptera chalumeaui: Chalumeau & Touroult 2005: 59 – Pic Paradis, FC; Concordia, DE

Solenoptera chalumeaui: Touroult 2019b – no locality, PHD; no locality, M. Yokoyama

Endemic to St. Martin.

Subfamily CERAMBYCINAE Latreille, 1802: 211

Achryson quadrimaculatum (Fabricius, 1792a): 328

Aruba

Achryson ornatipenne: Gilmour 1968: 106 – Plantage Fontein, HJMG; no locality, JZ; Eagle Petroleum Company, W of Oranjestad, PWH; no locality, RHC

Curaçao

Achryson quadrimaculatum: This study – Suffisant, RK

New species record for Curaçao. For the year of publication see Evenhuis (1997).

Achryson surinamum (Linnaeus, 1767): 632

Aruba

Achryson surinamum: Gilmour 1968: 104 – Oranjestad, HJMG; Eagle Petroleum Company, W. of Oranjestad, PWH; Bubali, NW of Oranjestad, PWH

Bonaire

Achryson surinamum: Gilmour 1968: 104 – Kralendijk, Hotel Zeebad, PWH; no locality, RHC; no locality, ESPK

Curaçao

Achryson surinamum: Gilmour 1968: 104 – hofje Porto Marie, HJMG; hofje Sint Kruis, HJMG; hofje Savonet, HJMG; Jongbloed, BJ; no locality, RHC; Willemstad, RHC; Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, RHC; no locality, BJ; Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, PWH; no locality, Heylaerts

Achryson surinamum: This study – Suffisant, RK

St. Martin

Achryson surinamum: Villiers 1980a: 271 – Cul-de-Sac, AD; no locality, JHPB

Achryson surinamum: Chalumeau & Touroult 2005: 74 – Cul-de-Sac, no leg.; Concordia, DE

Achryson surinamum: Touroult 2019b – no locality, M. Yokoyama; no locality, EP

Anelaphus cinereus (Olivier, 1800a): 69

[Curaçao]

Anelaphus subtropicus: Gilmour 1968: 133 –, BJ

The presence of this species on Curaçao is questionable. According to Monné (2020a) Anelaphus cinereus is known elsewhere from Florida, Cuba, Hispaniola, Jamaica, Bahamas, Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Bermudas, and Puerto Rico. Ivie (1985) synonymised Anoplium subtropicus Casey, 1924: 245 with A. cinereus and referred several A. subtropicus nec Casey, 1924 auct. to A. nanus but did not investigate the single known specimen from Curaçao which is in DMAG. The occurrence of the latter species on Curaçao would be equally doubtful because this species would then have a similar disjunct range as A. cinereus. However, until the Doncaster specimen has been investigated the species cannot fully be excluded because there are at least two other longhorn beetle species with a similar range which are present on Curaçao. For the year of publication see Bousquet (2018).

Anelaphus curacaoensis Gilmour, 1968: 133

Curaçao

Anelaphus curacaoensis Gilmour, 1968: 133 – Groot Piscadera, PWH; Pasanggrahan, PWH; Mahaai, BJ; Jongbloed, BJ; Parera, Willemstad, RHC; Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, RHC; Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, PWH

Anelaphus curacaoensis: This study – Jongbloed, BJ

Endemic to Curaçao.

Anelaphus nanus (Fabricius, 1792a): 300

St. Martin

Anelaphus subtropicus: Villiers 1980a: 289 – no locality, JHPB

Anelaphus nanus: Ivie 1985: 304 – without further data

Caribbomerus attenuatus (Chevrolat, 1862): 263

St. Martin

Caribbomerus attenuatus: Chalumeau & Touroult 2005: 110 – Pic Paradis, no leg.

Based on the distinguishing characters listed in Lingafelter (2011), Touroult (2012) referred previous records of Caribbomerus attenuatus from the Lesser Antilles to C. similis (Fisher, 1932). According to him C. attenuatus is only present on Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Bahamas and possibly the Virgin Islands. Peck (2016) followed him but noted that Touroult only reinvestigated specimens from Guadeloupe and not from other Lesser Antillean islands. Touroult’s current opinion is that this issue is in need of further study based on more material and until then the species present on St. Martin should be considered C. attenuatus (Touroult in litt. 2020).

Curtomerus flavus (Fabricius, 1775): 191

Aruba

Curtomerus flavus: Gilmour 1968: 143 – no locality, RHC

Bonaire

Curtomerus flavus: Gilmour 1968: 143 – Dos Poos, HJMG

Curaçao

Curtomerus flavus: Gilmour 1968: 143 – hofje Porto Marie, HJMG; hofje St. Kruis, HJMG; Plantersrust, GJHM; Hato, ADR; Jongbloed, BJ; Willemstad, RHC; no locality, RHC; no locality, BJ

Curtomerus flavus: This study – Suffisant, RK

Saba

Cylindera flava: Gilmour 1963a: 96 – Windwardside, RHC

St. Martin

Cylindera flava: Gilmour 1963a: 96 – Philipsburg, PWH

Curtomerus flavus: Villiers 1980a: 282 – no locality, JHPB

Curtomerus flavus: Touroult 2019b – no locality, M. Yokoyama; no locality, EP

Eburia bonairensis Gilmour, 1968: 115

Bonaire

Eburia bonairensis Gilmour, 1968: 115 – Kralendijk, HJMG; hofje Fontein, HJMG; Dos Poos, HJMG; Kralendijk, PWH; no locality, ESPK; no locality, RHC

Eburnia (sic!) quadrimaculata: Werner 1925: 556 – no locality, AG

Eburia bonairensis: Thomas 2020: GBIF – Kralendijk, industrial mudflats, DWB

Eburia bonairensis: This study – Rincón, JKW

Curaçao

Eburia bonairensis Gilmour, 1968: 115 – Hato, ADR; Willemstad, RHC

Eburia quadrimaculata sensu Werner 1925 is probably this species. This specimen is probably the paratype in the Ernst Fuchs Collection (now in the Herbert Schmid collection, Vienna (Monné & Monné 2006)) which Gilmour (1968) listed in his description.

Eburia decemmaculata ( Fabricius, 1775): 181

[Saba]

Eburia decemmaculata: Terpstra 2013a: Observation.org – Windward Side, M. Terpstra

St. Eustatius

Eburia decemmaculata: Gilmour 1963a: 77 – Oranjestad, RHC

St. Martin

Eburia decemmaculata: Gilmour 1963a: 77 – Philipsburg, PWH; Philipsburg, RHC; Lowlands, RHC

Eburia decemmaculata: Touroult 2019b – no locality, PHD; no locality, M. Yokoyama

Two records from Nevis on iNaturalist (Hewitt 2017, 2018).

Eburia thoracica White, 1853: 92

Curaçao

Eburia thoracica: Gilmour 1968: 112 – Hato, ADR; Jongbloed, BJ; Mahaai, BJ; Willemstad, RHC; Julianadorp, Y; Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, RHC; Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, LJS; Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, PWH; no locality, BJ

Eburia thoracica: Martins 1997: 81 – Piscadera Baai, no leg.

Eburia thoracica: This study – Suffisant, RK

Elaphidion conspersum Newman, 1841: 110

Bonaire

Elaphidion conspersum: Villiers 1980a: 285 – without further data

Curaçao

Elaphidion conspersum: Gilmour 1968: 127 – Cas Cora, Agricultural Station, ACJB; Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, PWH

St. Martin

Elaphidion spinicorne: Gilmour 1963a: 81 – Philipsburg, PWH; Philipsburg, RHC

Elaphidion conspersum: Villiers 1980a: 285 – Baie Nettlé, JHPB

Elaphidion spinicorne: Chalumeau & Touroult 2005: 94 – Cul-de-Sac, AD

Elaphidion conspersum: Chalumeau & Touroult 2005: 96 – Baie Nettlé, no leg.; Mont Vernon, DE

Ivie (1985) is here followed in assigning non-Jamaican Elaphidion spinicorne records to this species.

Elaphidion curacaoae Gilmour, 1968: 128

Curaçao

Elaphidion curacaoae Gilmour, 1968: 128 – Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, PWH

Endemic to Curaçao.

Elaphidion glabratum (Fabricius, 1792a): 295

Saba

Elaphidion glabratum: Chalumeau & Touroult 2005: 101 – no locality, DE

St. Eustatius

Elaphidion cobbeni Gilmour, 1963a: 81 – no locality, RHC

Elaphidion glabratum: Villiers 1979b: 96 – same as above

Elaphidion glabratum: This study – Botanical Garden, KB

St. Martin

Elaphidion hummelincki Gilmour, 1963a: 84 – Philipsburg, PWH

Elaphidion glabratum: Villiers 1979b: 96 – same as above

Elaphidion glabratum: Villiers 1980a: 287 – Terre-Basse, P. Pinchon; l’Orient, P. Pinchon; without further data, ex col. Bates)

Elaphidion glabratum: Chalumeau & Touroult 2005: 101 – Philipsburg, no leg.

Elaphidion glabratum: Touroult 2019b – no locality, M. Yokoyama

Elaphidion irroratum (Linnaeus, 1767): 633

[Aruba]

Elaphidion irroratum: Oversteegen 2019: iNaturalist – without further details

Bonaire

Elaphidion irroratum: Gilmour 1968: 125 – Rincón, HJMG; hofje Fontein, HJMG; Dos Poos, HJMG; Kralendijk, PWH; no locality, RHC; no locality, ESPK

Elaphidion irroratum: This study – Rincón, JKW

Curaçao

Elaphidion irroratum: Gilmour 1968: 125 – hofje St. Kruis, HJMG; Willemstad, VHB; St. Thomas College, Hoogstraat, Willemstad, WAJH; Museum, Willemstad, 1949, PWH; Jongbloed, BJ; Willemstad, RHC; Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, RHC; Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, JHS; no locality, BJ; Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, PWH

Elaphidion irroratum: This study – Suffisant, RK

St. Martin

Elaphidion insulare Gilmour 1963a: 81 (nec Newman, 1840: 27) – Philipsburg, PWH

Elaphidion insulare sensu Gilmour 1963a (pro parte): Villiers, 1979b: 97 – without further data

Elaphidion irroratum debieni Chalumeau & Touroult, 2004: 754 – Cul de Sac, FC

Elaphidion irroratum debieni: Chalumeau & Touroult 2005: 98 – Cul-de-Sac, DE

Heterachthes sablensis Blatchley, 1920: 68

Aruba

Heterachthes arubae: Gilmour, 1968: 146 – no locality, RHC

Not endemic to Aruba as listed by Debrot (2006) (as H. arubae).

Methia necydalea (Fabricius, 1798): 148

[Saba]

Methia necydalea: Touroult 2012: 83 – without further data

St. Eustatius

Methia necydalea: Gilmour 1963a: 96 – no locality, RHC

Methia necydalea: This study – Oranjestad, EOC; Botanical Garden, KB; The Quill, KB; The Quill, AJW; The Quill, JTS

St. Martin

Methia necydalea: Villiers 1980a: 269 – Cul-de-Sac, AD

Methia necydalea: Philips 1990: 136 – Cul-de-Sac, AD; Marigot, FC; Griselle, FC

Methia necydalea: Philips & Ivie 1998: 72 – same as above

Methia necydalea: Touroult 2019b – no locality, M. Yokoyama

Touroult (2012, Annexe I), followed by Peck (2016), was the first to list Saba for this species. However, the entry is not in bold as are the other new island records in his table. Moreover, he did not list St. Kitts (the adjoining column in the table), an island record from Frigate Bay first mentioned by Chalumeau & Touroult (2005). The latter paper is listed in the references section by Touroult (2012). Julien Touroult kindly checked his collection and there is no voucher for Saba there (Touroult 2020 in litt). Although it is certainly possible that Methia necydalea is present on Saba, this particular record is probably a typographic error and, without availability of a voucher, we have here placed this record between brackets for now.

Methia trium Gilmour, 1968: 100

Aruba

Methia trium Gilmour, 1968: 100 – Oranjestad, HJMG; Eagle Petroleum Company, PWH; Bubali, PWH

Bonaire

Methia trium Gilmour, 1968: 100 – hofje Fontein, HJMG; Dos Poos, HJMG; Kralendijk, PWH; no locality, ESPK; no locality, RHC

Curaçao

Methia trium Gilmour, 1968: 100 – hofje Porto Marie, HJMG; hofje Sint Kruis, HJMG; hofje Savonet, HJMG; Jongbloed, BJ; Willemstad, RHC; Julianadorp, RHC; CARMABI, RHC; no locality, RHC; Cas Cora, no leg.; Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, PWH; no locality, BJ

Methia trium: Philips 1990: 29 – CARMABI, Piscadera Baai, PWH; Coral Specht, 3 km E. Willemstad, WES & JMS; Ascencion, WES & JMS

Methia trium: Philips & Ivie 1998: 69 – Piscadera, MRDP; CARMABI, Piscadera Baai, PWH; Coral Specht, 3 km E. Willemstad, WES & JMS; Ascencion, WES & JMS

Methia trium: This study – Jongbloed, BJ; Suffisant, RK

Mionochroma vittatum (Fabricius, 1775 ): 166

Curaçao

Callichroma (Mionochroma) vittatum: Gilmour 1968: 148 – Jongbloed, BJ; Willemstad, RHC; Willemstad, St. Thomas school, WAJH; Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, RHC; Patatentuin, Sta. Martha, ACJB

Neoclytus araneiformis (Olivier, 1800a): 61

Saba

Neoclytus araneiformis: Gilmour 1963a: 96 – Windwardside, RHC

Neoclytus araneiformis: Chalumeau & Touroult 2005: 118 – no locality, DE

For the year of publication see Bousquet (2018).

Neocompsa cylindricollis (Fabricius, 1798): 146

Saba

Neocompsa cylindricollis: Chalumeau & Touroult 2005: 109 – St. Johns, no leg.

St. Eustatius

Heterachthes quadrimaculatus: Gilmour 1963a: 93 – no locality, RHC

Neocompsa cylindricollis: This study – Oranjestad, EOC

St. Martin

Neocompsa quadrimaculata: Villiers 1980a: 291 – no locality, JHPB

Neocompsa cylindricollis: Chalumeau & Touroult 2005: 109 – Pic Paradis, no leg.; Concordia, DE

There are records from Nevis and Anguilla on iNaturalist (Hewitt 2017, 2019, Bourque 2019).

Nesanoplium puberulum ( Fleutiaux & Sallé, 1890): 464

St. Eustatius

Nesanoplium puberulum: This study – The Quill, JTS

New species record for St. Eustatius. Collected from a Malaise trap.

Oxymerus aculeatus Dupont, 1838: 38

Aruba

Oxymerus lebasi: Gilmour 1968: 118 – Solito, PWH; Bubali, PWH; no locality, RHC

Oxymerus aculeatus lebasi: Hüdepohl 1979: 23 – San Nicolas, JGB

Curaçao

Oxymerus lebasi: Gilmour 1968: 118 – Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, RHC; Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, BJ

Oxymerus aculeatus lebasi: Hüdepohl 1979: 23 – Wellenstad [= probably Willemstad], no leg.

Oxymerus aculeatus: This study – Jongbloed, BJ

St. Martin

Oxymerus aculeatus lebasi: Touroult 2019b – no locality, M. Yokoyama; no locality, EP

Oxymerus aculeatus lebasi: greensxm 2019 – îlet de Pinel, no leg.

Listed and photographed by Yokoyama (2013) and shown as present with reference to Yokoyama on the website of the French l’Inventaire National du Patrimoine Naturel (INPN 2020) for St. Martin.

Stizocera curacaoae Gilmour, 1968: 139

Curaçao

Stizocera curacaoae Gilmour, 1968: 139 – Jongbloed, BJ; Willemstad, RHC; Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, PWH

Stizocera curacaoae: This study – Suffisant, RK

Not endemic to Curaçao as mentioned by Debrot (2006). This species is also present in Colombia (Martins 2005).

Stizocera insolita Gilmour, 1968: 141

Curaçao

Stizocera insolita Gilmour, 1968: 141 – no locality, BJ

Stizocera insolita: This study – Suffisant, RK

Endemic to Curaçao

Trachyderes succinctus (Linnaeus, 1758): 391

St. Martin

Trachyderes succinctus: Villiers 1980a: 304 – no locality, JHPB

Trachyderes succinctus: Hüdepohl 1985: 109 – without further data

Trachyderes succinctus succinctus: Touroult 2019b – no locality, M. Yokoyama

Also present on St. Kitts (UPRM 2020), an island not listed by Peck (2011, 2016). There are also two records from Anguilla on iNaturalist (Mlodinow 2017, Parles 2019).

Subfamily LAMIINAE Latreille, 1825: 401

Amniscus praemorsus (Fabricius, 1792a): 275

St. Martin

Leptostyloides praemorsus: Villiers 1980c: 571 – without further data

Amniscus praemorsus: Chalumeau & Touroult 2005: 180 – Philipsburg, PWH; Pic Paradis, no leg.; Concordia, DE

Amniscus praemorsus: Touroult 2019b – no locality, M. Yokoyama

Amniscus similis (Gahan, 1895): 136

Saba

Leptostyloides turbidus Gilmour, 1963b: 63 – Windwardside, RHC

St. Eustatius

Leptostyloides turbidus Gilmour, 1963b: 63 – no locality, RHC

Leptostyloides similis: Villiers 1980d: 91 – same as above

Amniscus similis: This study – Botanical Garden, KB; Oranjestad, EOC

Desmiphora hirticollis (Olivier, 1800b): 11

Curaçao

Desmiphora hirticollis: Gilmour 1968: 151 – Willemstad, 1956, RHC; Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, RHC; Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, PWH; Julianadorp, Y; no locality, RHC; no locality, BJ

For the year of publication see Bousquet (2018).

Dorcasta dasycera (Erichson, 1849): 574

Aruba

Dorcasta dasycera: Gilmour 1968: 150 – no locality, RHC

For the year of publication see Bousquet (2016). Bezark et al. (2018) recently revised Dorcasta but they did not mention the southern Antilles as part of the range of this species.

Ecyrus hirtipes Gahan, 1895: 127

Saba

Ecyrus hirtipes: Touroult 2012: 84 – without further data

St. Eustatius

Ecyrus hirtipes: This study – inland from Corre Corre Bay, AJW; Welfare Road, THB

New species record for St. Eustatius.

Estoloides perforata (Bates, 1872): 200

Curaçao

Estoloides perforata: Gilmour 1968: 153 – Jongbloed, BJ; Willemstad, RHC; Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, RHC

Lagocheirus araneiformis (Linnaeus, 1767): 625

Aruba

Lagocheirus araneiformis curacaoensis Gilmour, 1968: 158 – Eagle Petroleum Company, W of Oranjestad, PWH; Oranjestad, JGB; Savaneta, JGB; Bubali, PWH

Bonaire

Lagochirus (sic!) sp. aff. obsoletus: Werner 1925: 556 – no locality, AG

Lagocheirus araneiformis curacaoensis Gilmour, 1968: 158 – Kralendijk, PWH; no locality, RHC

Curaçao

Lagocheirus araneiformis curacaoensis Gilmour, 1968: 158 – St. Kruis, hofje, HJMG; hofje Savonet, HJMG; Willemstad, BJ; Jongbloed, BJ; Emmastad, RF; Willemstad, RHC; Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, PWH; no locality, de Wolff

Lagocheirus araneiformis: This study – Suffisant, RK

[Saba]

Lagocheirus araneiformis guadeloupensis: Touroult 2012: 85 – without further data

St. Eustatius

Lagocheirus araneiformis guadeloupensis: Gilmour 1963b: 58 – Oranjestad, PWH; no locality, RHC

St. Martin

Lagocheirus araneiformis guadeloupensis: Gilmour 1963b: 58 – Philipsburg, PWH; no locality, RHC

Lagochirus (sic!) sp. aff. obsoletus Werner 1925 is probably this species. Touroult (2012, Annexe I), followed by Peck (2016), was the first to list Saba for this species. However, the entry is not in bold as are the other new island records in his table and he does not list St. Eustatius in the adjoining column in the table. Julien Touroult checked his collection and there is no voucher for Saba there (Touroult 2020 in litt). Although it is certainly possible that Lagocheirus araneiformis occurs on Saba, this particular record is probably a typographic error and we have here placed this record between brackets for now.

Leptostylopsis argentatus ( Jacquelin du Val, 1857 ): 273

Curaçao

Leptostylopsis argentatus: Gilmour 1968: 160 – Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, RHC

Leptostylopsis argentatus: This study – Suffisant, RK

Curaçao lies far outside the range of this species which occurs from southern Florida to Georgia, Cuba, Hispaniola, Puerto Rico, Bahamas, Jamaica and Cayman Islands (Monné 2020b). Its presence on Curaçao is possibly the result of a recent introduction. See also Urgleptes cobbeni below.

Lithargyrus guadeloupensis (Villiers, 1980d): 89

Saba

Lithargyrus guadeloupensis: Touroult 2012: 85 – without further data

Nealcidion socium (Gahan, 1895): 131

Curaçao

Nealcidion socium: This study – Suffisant, RK

New species record for Curaçao.

Nyssodrysina haldemani (LeConte, 1852b): 173

Curaçao

Nyssodrysina haldemani: Gilmour 1968: 162 – no locality, BJ

Psapharochrus circumflexus (Jacquelin du Val, 1857): 270

Curaçao

Acanthoderes (Psapharochrus) circumflexa: Gilmour 1968: 154 – Emmastad, RF; no locality, BJ; Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, PWH

Psapharochrus circumflexus: This study – Suffisant, RK

Styloleptus inermis (Fabricius, 1801a): 293

St. Eustatius

Caribbeana hebes Gilmour, 1963a: 98 – no locality, RHC

Styloleptus inermis: Ivie 1985: 315 – same as above

Styloleptus posticalis (Gahan, 1895): 133

Saba

Styloleptus posticalis: Touroult 2012: 85 – without further data

Urgleptes cobbeni Gilmour, 1963b: 85

Bonaire

Urgleptes cobbeni: Gilmour 1968: 169 – no locality, ESPK; no locality, RHC

Curaçao

Urgleptes cobbeni: Gilmour 1968: 169 – Jongbloed, BJ; Piscadera Baai, CARMABI, RHC; Julianadorp, RHC

Urgleptes cobbeni: This study – Suffisant, RK

Saba

Urgleptes cobbeni Gilmour, 1963b: 85 – Windwardside, RHC

St. Eustatius

Urgleptes cobbeni Gilmour, 1963b: 85 – no locality, RHC

Urgleptes cobbeni: This study – no locality, THB

St. Martin

Urgleptes cobbeni: Chalumeau 1983c: 233 – Pic Paradis, FC

Urgleptes cobbeni: Touroult 2019b – no locality, EP

Chalumeau & Touroult (2005) listed Urgleptes guadeloupensis as the only Urgleptes species present on Curaçao and suspected the Bonaire and Curaçao records of U. cobbeni to be either erroneous or the result of a recent introduction. In light of the fact that U. cobbeni has been collected by several collectors from at least 1957 until 1983 the latter could be the right explanation. However, hitherto the first author has seen 13 specimens of U. cobbeni and no U. guadeloupensis from Curaçao. The latter species is only known from a single specimen of the ABC islands (see below).

Urgleptes guadeloupensis (Fleutiaux & Sallé, 1890): 472

Curaçao

Urgleptes guadeloupensis: Gilmour 1968: 166 – hofje Sint Kruis, HJMG

Cazier & Lacey (1952) is the only paper that includes Antigua in the range of this species but without reference to a specimen or a publication. Their listing might belong to one of the later described Urgleptes species. The reported range and validity of the various Urgleptes species in the Antilles seems to be unclear at the least. Chalumeau & Touroult (2005) not only suspect the Bonaire and Curaçao records of U. cobbeni to be either erroneous or the result of a recent introduction, they also suspect U. clarkei Chemsak, 1966 to be synonymous with U. sandersoni Gilmour, 1963b. Urgleptes clarkei was described by Chemsak based on specimens collected on the Virgin Islands and Antigua. Chemsak (1966) did not mention any of Gilmour’s papers in his description and did not seem to have compared his specimens with the species described by Gilmour (1963b, 1968). Gilmour (1968) questioned the presence of U. clarkei on Antigua and, in light of the disjunct distribution and the fact that Peck (2016) recently added Antigua to the range of U. cobbeni, might prove to be right. A revision of Antillean Urgleptes would be highly desirable.

Urgleptes hummelincki Gilmour, 1968: 171

Aruba

Urgleptes hummelincki Gilmour, 1968: 171 – Bubali, NW of Oranjestad, PWH

Endemic to Aruba.

Family BRUCHIDAE Latreille, 1802: 192

See also the remark below under the family Chrysomelidae.

Subfamily PACHYMERINAE Bridwell, 1929: 142

Caryedon gonagra (Fabricius, 1798): 159

Curaçao

Caryedon gonagra: Davey 1958: 393 – no locality, FJS

Caryoborus gonagra: Wiebes 1961: 234 – imported into The Netherlands from Willemstad, A.F.C. Gogelein

Caryedon serratus: Bottimer 1968: 1037 – imported into the USA in 1953 and 1963, no leg.

Introduced. Often confused with the groundnut pest Caryedon serratus (Olivier, 1790): 199. The species are very similar but can be distinguished by the structure of the male genitalia (Delobel et al. 2003).

Subfamily AMBLYCERINAE Bridwell, 1932: 103

Amblycerus dispar (Sharp, 1885): 494

Curaçao

Amblycerus dispar: Ribeiro-Costa et al. 2018: 506 – Hato, BM

Amblycerus dispar: dos Santos & Ribeiro-Costa 2019: 111 – no locality, T.E. Rogers; Hato, BM

Amblycerus schwarzi Kingsolver, 1970: 477

Curaçao

Amblycerus schwarzi Kingsolver, 1970: 477 – imported into the USA, Plant Quarantine interception, Washington D.C., H.L. Sanford

Zabrotes achiote Romero & Johnson, 2000: 227

[Aruba]

Zabrotes achiote Romero & Johnson, 2000: 227 – “BONAIRE: Aruba”, JMC

[Bonaire]

Zabrotes achiote Romero & Johnson, 2000: 227 – “BONAIRE: Aruba”, JMC

Curaçao

Zabrotes achiote Romero & Johnson, 2000: 227 – Zapateer, JMC

The distribution of this species on the ABC islands is not completely clear. It possibly occurs on all three islands but Romero & Johnson (2000) and Romero Nápoles (2018) listed the enigmatic locality “BONAIRE: Aruba.” There is no locality called Aruba on Bonaire. In another paper the same authors listed Zabrotes achiote only for the island Bonaire (Romero & Johnson 2004) and on GBIF the locality is listed as “Aruba” and the country as “Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba” (Romero Nápoles 2018).

Subfamily BRUCHINAE Latreille, 1802: 192

Acanthoscelides Schilsky, 1905: C

St. Eustatius

Acanthoscelides species: This study – Oranjestad, EOC

Acanthoscelides desmanthi Johnson, 1977: 64

Curaçao

Acanthoscelides desmanthi: Johnson 1990: 364 – without further data

St. Eustatius

Acanthoscelides desmanthi: Johnson 1990: 364 – without further data

Acanthoscelides difficilis (Sharp, 1885): 452

St. Eustatius

Acanthoscelides difficilis: Johnson 1990: 369 – without further data

Acanthoscelides difficilis: This study – Oranjestad, EOC

Acanthoscelides flavescens (Fåhraeus, 1839): 32

Aruba

Acanthoscelides ochraceicolor: Kingsolver 1969: 53 – no locality, JMC

Acanthoscelides flavescens: Johnson 1990: 384 – without further data

Bonaire

Acanthoscelides ochraceicolor: Kingsolver 1969: 53 – N. Washington, JMC

Acanthoscelides flavescens: Johnson 1990: 384 – without further data

Curaçao

Acanthoscelides flavescens: Johnson 1990: 384 – without further data

Acanthoscelides indigoferestes Johnson, 1983: 100

[St. Eustatius]

Acanthoscelides indigoferestes: Johnson 1990: 399 – without further data

Johnson (1990) is the first to include St. Eustatius (as St. Estatius) in the range of this species but it is unclear on which basis. This species is elsewhere known from Panama, Colombia and Venezuela, and from an interception by the United States Department of Agriculture of material originating from the Dominican Republic (Johnson 1990).

Acanthoscelides macrophthalmus (Schaeffer, 1907): 300

Bonaire

Acanthoscelides macrophthalmus: Beenen in litt. 2017 – Rincón, JKW

New species record for Bonaire.

Acanthoscelides pertinax (Sharp, 1885): 453

Curaçao

Acanthoscelides pertinax: Johnson 1990: 444 – without further data

Acanthoscelides rufovittatus (Schaeffer, 1907): 303

Curaçao

Acanthoscelides rufovittatus: Johnson 1990: 462 – without further data

Acanthoscelides zeteki Kingsolver, 1969: 50

Curaçao

Acanthoscelides zeteki Kingsolver, 1969: 50 – imported into the USA, U.S. Department of Agriculture Plant Quarantine

Callosobruchus maculatus (Fabricius, 1775): 65

[St. Martin]

Callosobruchus maculatus: Yokoyama 2013: 82 – without further data

Listed and photographed by Yokoyama (2013) and shown as present with reference to Yokoyama on the website of the INPN (2020) for St. Martin. It is not clear if vouchers are available.

Megacerus tricolor (Suffrian, 1870): 157

Curaçao

Megacerus tricolor: Terán & Kingsolver 1992: 23 – Schottgatwee [=Schottegatweg], JMC

Mimosestes insularis Kingsolver & Johnson, 1978: 35

Curaçao

Mimosestes insularis Kingsolver & Johnson, 1978: 35 – Damacar, JMC

Mimosestes mimosae ( Fabricius, 1781): 76

Aruba

Mimosestes mimosae: Kingsolver & Johnson 1978: 42 – imported into the USA, Hoboken Plant Quarantine, New Jersey

Bonaire

Mimosestes mimosae Beenen in litt. 2017 – Rincón, JKW

Curaçao

[Mimosestes mimosae: Kingsolver & Johnson 1978: 42 – without further data]

Mimosestes mimosae: Fägerström 2020: GBIF – without further data

New species record for Bonaire. Kingsolver & Johnson (1978) listed Curaçao but only in the distribution of the species. They did not list a specimen for the island whereas they did so for Aruba.

Stator cearanus (Pic, 1930): 12

Curaçao

Stator cearanus: Kingsolver 1972: 225 – Schottgatwee [=Schottegatweg], JMC

Johnson (1995) synonymised Stator cearanus with S. limbatus (Horn, 1873b): 326 but Kingsolver et al. (2017) later considered it a valid species again.

Stator sordidus (Horn, 1873b): 326

Curaçao

Stator sordidus: Escobar-Domínguez et al. 2018: 13 – without further data

Escobar-Domínguez et al. 2018 listed this species for Curaçao but only in the distribution of the species and without further details. We have not been able to find an earlier record for Curaçao.

Family CHRYSOMELIDAE Latreille, 1802: 220

Ivie et al. (2009) listed eight species of this family from Saba. The present paper contains information on four which means that at least four, as yet unpublished, other species are present on the island. It is unclear if the family Chrysomelidae in the poster of Ivie et al. (2009) includes the Bruchidae as a family or a subfamily.

Subfamily CASSIDINAE Gyllenhal, 1813: 434

Agenysa guianiensis (Boheman, 1856): 36

Curaçao

Agenysa guianiensis: Viana 1968: 83 – no locality, CTE

Chalepus sanguinicollis ( Linnaeus, 1771): 550

[St. Martin]

Chalepus sanguinicollis: Yokoyama 2013: 82 – without further data

Listed and photographed by Yokoyama (2013) and shown as present with reference to Yokoyama on the website of the INPN (2020) for St. Martin. It is not clear if vouchers are available. UPRM (2020) lists two specimens in EPRL from St. Kitts, an island not listed by Peck (2011, 2016).

Charidotella sexpunctata (Fabricius, 1781): 109

[Saba]

Charidotella sexpunctata: Terpstra 2013a: Observation.org – Mount Scenery, M. Terpstra

[St. Martin]

Charidotella sexpunctata: Yokoyama 2010: 80 – without further data

Listed and photographed by Yokoyama (2010) for St. Martin. It is not clear if vouchers are available.

Chelymorpha multipunctata (Olivier, 1791b): 384

[Saba]

Chelymorpha cribraria: Terpstra 2013a: Observation.org – Mount Scenery, M. Terpstra

Chelymorpha cribraria: Terpstra 2013b: iNaturalist – same as above

Chelymorpha cribraria: van der Beek 2018: Observation.org – Mount Scenery, J. van der Beek

Cassidinae species: DeMaster 2018: iNaturalist – Windward Side, N. DeMaster

Chelymorpha cribraria: Haber 2019: iNaturalist – Windward Side, E. Haber

[St. Martin]

Chelymorpha cribraria: Yokoyama 2013: 82 – without further data

All records are listed as Chelymorpha cribraria. However, Sekerka & Barclay (2014) revised the Fabrician Cassidinae types present in the Natural History Museum, London. They found that the two types of Cassida cribraria Fabricius, 1775: 90 do agree with the original description but are conspecific with Ch. cassidea (Fabricius, 1775): 82 and not with Ch. cribraria as defined and used since Boheman (1854). As a result Ch. cribraria auct. loses its name and must be replaced by the next available name Chelymorpha multipunctata (Olivier, 1791b).

For the year of publication see Bousquet (2016). Olivier (1791b) in his “Encyclopédie méthodique” described Cassida multipunctata from specimens donated by de Badier from “Guadeloupe”. Later, when treating this species in his “Entomologie” he only mentioned “Guyane française” as its patria (Olivier 1808a: 957). It is not clear whether the latter is a correction of the terra typica or if Olivier (1808a) forgot to mention Guadeloupe. Barthélemy de Badier (1740?–1789) lived for several years in Guadeloupe but also received specimens from other French territories in the Caribbean and South America (Cupello 2018). As Olivier (1808a) referred to the original description and both descriptions closely match, he intended to treat the same species, not a different one erroneously under the same name. The latter could be concluded from some sources giving 1808 as the year of publication of this species. According to Staines & Whittington (2003), who indeed use the year 1808, two syntypes are in the Royal Museum of Scotland.

Listed and photographed by Yokoyama (2013) and shown as present with reference to Yokoyama on the website of the INPN (2020) for St. Martin. It is not clear if vouchers are available.

Hilarocassis exclamationis (Linnaeus, 1767): 577

[Curaçao]

Hilarocassis exclamationis: Benschop 2010: Observation.org – Christoffel Park, A. Benschop

Subfamily GALERUCINAE Latreille, 1802: 228

Altica occidentalis Suffrian, 1868: 197

[St. Martin]

Altica cf. occidentalis: Yokoyama 2010: 81 – without further data

Probably based on a photo, Yokoyama (2010) provisionally listed this species for St. Martin. Altica occidentalis is known elsewhere in the Caribbean area from Antigua, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Cuba, Dominica, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Guana, Hispaniola, Jamaica, Martinique, Puerto Rico, St. Croix, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Vieques and the Virgin Islands (Peck 2016). Clark et al. (2013) suspect that specimens from the southern islands belong to a different species.

Chaetocnema minutissima (Suffrian, 1868): 220

Curaçao

Chaetocnema minutissima: Bechyné 1955: 183 – without further data

Disonycha spilotrachela Blake, 1928: 96

[Saba]

Disonycha spilotrachela: Haber 2019: iNaturalist – Zions Hill, E. Haber

[St. Martin]

Disonycha spilotrachela: Yokoyama 2013: 82 – without further data

Listed and photographed by Yokoyama (2013) and shown as present with reference to Yokoyama on the website of the INPN (2020) for St. Martin. It is not clear if vouchers are available. Numerous records from Nevis on iNaturalist (for instance Hewitt 2019).

Omophoita albicollis (Fabricius, 1787b): 76

[Saba]

Omophoita albicollis: Boeken 2010: photo sent to the first author

Omophoita albicollis: Terpstra 2013a: Observation.org – Mount Scenery, M. Terpstra

Omophoita albicollis: Terpstra 2013b: iNaturalist – same as above

[St. Martin]

Omophoita albicollis: Yokoyama 2013: 82 – without further data

Listed and photographed by Yokoyama (2013) and shown as present with reference to Yokoyama on the website of the INPN (2020) for St. Martin. It is not clear if vouchers are available. Listed by Questel (2014) and shown as present with reference to Questel on the website of the INPN (2020) for St. Barthélemy. It is not clear if vouchers are available. Also two records for Nevis on iNaturalist (Hewitt 2018, 2019).

Yingaresca spiloptera (Blake, 1959): 180

[Curaçao]

Galerucella spiloptera Blake, 1959: 180 – collected in Miami, USA in a plane from Curaçao, via Jamaica, W.F. Buren

Yingaresca spiloptera: Wilcox 1971: 106 – “Curaçao or Jamaica”

Galerucella spiloptera: Orrell 2020: GBIF – same as above

Subfamily EUMOLPINAE Hope, 1840: 162

Colaspis musae Bechyné, 1950: 71

Bonaire

Colaspis musae: Beenen in litt. 2017 – Karpata, G. den Hollander

New species record for Bonaire.

Subfamily CRYPTOCEPHALINAE Gyllenhal, 1813: 582

Cryptocephalus krugi Weise, 1885: 148

St. Eustatius

Cryptocephalus krugi: This study – The Quill, JTS

[St. Martin]

Cryptocephalus krugi: Yokoyama 2013: 82 – without further data

New species record for St. Eustatius and the Lesser Antilles. Hitherto known from Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands (Weise 1885, Wolcott 1951, Valentine & Ivie 2005). Also listed and photographed by Yokoyama (2013) and shown as present with reference to Yokoyama on the website of the INPN (2020) for St. Martin. It is not clear if vouchers are available. Listed by Questel (2014) and shown as present with reference to Questel on the website of the INPN (2020) for St. Barthélemy. It is not clear if vouchers are available.

Family ANTHRIBIDAE Billberg, 1820a: 39

Ivie et al. (2009) listed three, as yet unpublished, species of this family from Saba.

Family BRENTIDAE Billberg, 1820a: 40

Subfamily TRACHELIZINAE Lacordaire, 1865: 417

Nemocephalus monilis (Fabricius, 1787b): 95

Saba

Nemocephalus monilis: Gillett & Gillett 2019: 873 – Saba University, The Bottom, MPTG; English Quarter, Windward Side, MPTG; Lower Mountain Road, MPTG; Upper Hells Gate, MPTG; Upper Mountain Road, MPTG; Crispeen, St. Johns, MPTG; Hospital, The Bottom, MPTG; Booby Hill, MPTG; The Level, MPTG; Lower Hells Gate, MPTG; Saba University School of Medicine, The Bottom, MPTG

St. Eustatius

Nemocephalus monilis: This study – The Quill, KB; The Quill, AJW; Oranjestad, THB

St. Martin

Nemocephalus monilis: Mantilleri 2014: 114 – Pic Paradis, BLC; no locality, SAM

New species record for St. Eustatius. Collected at light, from under bark and from vegetation.

Subfamily CYLADINAE Schönherr, 1823: column 1137

Cylas formicarius (Fabricius, 1798): 174

[Curaçao]

Cylas formicarius elegantulus: Sherman & Tamashiro 1954: 5 – without further data

Cylas formicarius: van Buurt & Debrot 2012: 34 – without further data

[St. Eustatius]

Cylas formicarius: Ballou 1934: 212 – without further data

Cylas formicarius: van Buurt & Debrot 2012: 34 – without further data

St. Martin

Cylas formicarius: Bonfils & Bart 1967: 28 – without further data

Introduced. Not mentioned for any of the islands listed above by Peck (2011, 2016). It is not clear if Ballou’s St. Eustatius record is based on a voucher. The same applies to the records of van Buurt & Debrot who reported that the species was introduced in Curaçao in circa 1990. Sherman & Tamashiro (1954) reported it from that island as early as 1954. St. Eustatius is also listed by Denon & Mauléon (2004: 14) and Hagstrum & Subramanyam (2009: 70). Recorded for Anguilla (Ballou 1934: 212, Denon & Mauléon 2004: 14) and Antigua (Hagstrum & Subramanyam 2009: 70), but all without reference to vouchers.

Subfamily APIONINAE Schönherr, 1823: column 1136

Apion pilosum Gyllenhal, 1833: 258

St. Eustatius

Apion pilosum Gyllenhal, 1833: 258 – no locality, JEF

Not listed by Blackwelder (1947), Kissinger (1974) or Peck (2011, 2016). As far as we are aware the name is only mentioned in Gemminger & von Harold (1871), Wagner (1910, 1913), in Sherborne’s Index Animalium (1929) and in the supplement to the “Annotated checklist of the weevils (Curculionidae sensu lato) of North America, Central America, and the West Indies” (O’Brien & Wibmer 1984). The current whereabouts of the type of Apion pilosum is unknown. The type was collected by Forsström and was part of the Billberg collection (Gyllenhal 1833). Billberg was a Swedish entomologist whose first collection was almost completely destroyed in a fire in 1822. Only some of the types in that collection were saved. These types are currently housed in the Schönherr collection in NHRS (Löwegren 1952). Billberg started a new collection and bought Forsström’s insects from the Antilles. This collection was later deposited at BMNH via J.G. Children (Horn & Kahle 1935, Bousquet 2016). Smith (1986) also listed material from the Billberg collection as being present in HEC.

Family CURCULIONIDAE Latreille, 1802: 195

Ivie et al. (2009) listed 70 species of this family (including Scolytinae and Platypodinae) from Saba. Just four species of Curculionidae of which two only to genus level have been identified from the island. One other species of Curculionidae has been photographed.

Subfamily DRYOPHTHORINAE Schönherr, 1825: column 588

Metamasius hemipterus (Linnaeus, 1758): 377

[Saba]

Metamasius hemipterus: Terpstra 2013a: Observation.org – Ecolodge, Mount Scenery

Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier, 1791b): 473

Aruba

Rhynchophorus ferrugineus: Roda et al. 2011: 117 – without further data

Curaçao

Rhynchophorus ferrugineus: EPPO 2009: 2 – without further data

Rhynchophorus ferrugineus: Roda et al. 2011: 117 – Willemstad, no leg.

Rhynchophorus ferrugineus: Fiaboe et al. 2011: 768 – without further data

Introduced. In December 2008 Rhynchophorus ferrugineus was found on Curaçao for the first time for the Caribbean region (EPPO 2009). Its arrival on Curaçao is suspected to be the result of the importation of infected Phoenix palms from Egypt. Shipments of palm from Curaçao to Aruba, and lack of phytosanitary measures, have resulted in the establishment of the species on Aruba (Roda et al. 2011).

Scyphophorus acupunctatus Gyllenhal, 1838: 857

[Curaçao]

Scyphophorus acupunctatus: Ballou 1920: 10 – without further data

Reported by Ballou (1920) as attacking agave in Curaçao but there are no further reports about its existence on the island. Van Buurt & Debrot (2012) presented a list of exotic agricultural pests which are currently present in the Dutch Caribbean. Scyphophorus acupunctatus is not on that list although it is included in the alert list in this report.

Sitophilus linearis (Herbst, 1797): 5

Curaçao

Sitophilus linearis: Anonymous 1936: 35 – imported into the USA, no leg.

Sitophilus linearis: Wiebes 1961: 234 – imported into The Netherlands from Willemstad, A.F.C. Gogelein

St. Eustatius

Sitophilus linearis: This study – Oranjestad, RV

New species record for St. Eustatius. Collected from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) pods.

Sitophilus oryzae (Linnaeus, 1763): 12

St. Eustatius

Sitophilus oryzae: This study – Oranjestad, EOC

[St. Martin]

Sitophilus oryzae: Yokoyama 2013: 83 – without further data

New species record for St. Eustatius. Collected from the kitchen and the garden of the Caribbean Netherlands Science Institute. Also listed and photographed by Yokoyama (2013) and shown as present with reference to Yokoyama on the website of the INPN (2020) for St. Martin. It is not clear if vouchers are available.

Without a voucher and investigation of the aedeagus it is hardly possible to separate this species from Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky, 1855: 77 (Kuschel 1961). Sitophilus zeamais is not yet known from the Antilles but, as Peck (2016) also noted, being a cosmopolitan stored products pest it could also be present in the Lesser Antilles. Listed for Antigua by Roelofs (1875: xxv). This record was included in Leng & Mutchler (1914: 478) and Blackwelder (1947: 916) but is not in Peck (2011, 2016). For the page number and correct reference see Marshall (1983).

Subfamily CURCULIONINAE Latreille, 1802: 195

Anthonomus macromalus Gyllenhal, 1835a: 352

St. Eustatius

Anthonomus cf. macromalus: This study – Botanical Garden, KB

The Caribbean Anthonomus are badly in need of a modern revision. Although W.E. Clark and H.R. Burke wrote more than 30 papers in which they revised several species groups in this speciose genus, there is no key to these groups and a number of Caribbean species have never been investigated. Based on the keys in Hustache (1929) and Rheinheimer (2014) and the original descriptions of Anthonomus aestuans Fabricius, 1792a, A. infirmus Gyllenhal, 1835b and A. macromalus Gyllenhal, 1835a the Eustatius specimen is provisionally assigned to the latter. New provisional record for St. Eustatius. For the year of publication see Bousquet (2016).

Ceratopus Schönherr, 1843: 120

Saba

Ceratopus species: Gillett et al. 2014: 2229 – without further data

Sibinia setosa (LeConte, 1876): 218

[Aruba]

Sibinia (Microtychius) setosa: Clark 1978: 364 – “BONAIRE. Aruba”, no leg.

[Bonaire]

Sibinia (Microtychius) setosa: Clark 1978: 364 – “BONAIRE. Aruba”, no leg.

Curaçao

Sibinia (Microtychius) setosa: Clark 1978: 364 – “Damacar” [= Damacor], no leg.; Schottgatwee [= Schottegatweg], no leg.; Zapateer, no leg.)

The distribution of this species on the ABC islands is not entirely clear. It probably occurs on all islands (O’Brien & Wibmer 1982) but Clark (1978) listed the enigmatic locality “BONAIRE. Aruba”.

Subfamily BARIDINAE Schönherr, 1836: 636

Linogeraeus perscitus (Herbst, 1797): 28

Curaçao

Linogeraeus perscitus: Prena 2009: 163 – without further data

Orchidophilus aterrimus (Waterhouse, 1874): 226

Netherlands Antilles

Orchidophilus aterrimus: Prena 2008: 21 – introduced into the USA, intercepted in Miami from “Netherlands Antilles”

Introduced but it is unknown if the species has established itself in the Netherlands Antilles and, if so, on which island(s).

Subfamily CRYPTORHYNCHINAE Schönherr, 1825: column 585

St. Eustatius

Cryptorhynchinae species: This study – The Quill, EOC

New subfamily for St. Eustatius. Beaten from vegetation.

Parisacalles Faust, 1896: 55

St. Martin

Parisacalles species: Bonfils & Bart 1967: 28 – without further data

Pseudomopsis Champion, 1905: 486

Saba

Pseudomopsis species: Gillett et al. 2014: 2229 – without further data

Subfamily ENTIMINAE Schönherr, 1823: column 1138

Apodrosus argentatus Wolcott, 1924: 130

St. Eustatius

Apodrosus argentatus: This study – The Quill, AJW

Beaten from Tamarindus indicus. Hitherto known from Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Vieques Island and St. Croix (Girón & Franz 2010).

Artipus corycaeus Sahlberg, 1823: 22

St. Eustatius

Artipus corycaeus: Franz 2016 – no locality, STD

Diaprepes abbreviatus (Linnaeus, 1758): 386

[St. Martin]

Diaprepes abbreviatus: Yokoyama 2013: 83 – without further data

Listed and photographed by Yokoyama (2013) and shown as present with reference to Yokoyama on the website of the INPN (2020) for St. Martin. It is not clear if vouchers are available. Quoted in Myers (1931: 115) for St. Kitts and Nevis with reference to Ballou (1922). It is not clear if vouchers are available for Nevis but UPRM holds a specimen from St. Kitts (UPRM 2020), an island not listed by Peck (2011, 2016).

Diaprepes famelicus (Olivier, 1791b): 544

St. Eustatius

Diaprepes famelicus: This study – Oranjestad, THB

New record for St. Eustatius. Hand catch from an abandoned urban yard.

Isodrusus curacaoensis Cortés-Hernández & Anderson, 2019: 942

Curaçao

Isodrusus curacaoensis Cortés-Hernández & Anderson, 2019: 942 – Christoffel National Park, L. Masner

Endemic to Curaçao.

Lachnopus curvipes (Fabricius, 1787b): 113

Saba

Lachnopus curvipes: Gillett et al. 2014: 2230 – without further data

Girón et al. (2018: 52) added Barbuda and Antigua to the range as published by Peck (2011, 2016).

Lachnopus valgus (Fabricius, 1775): 150

St. Martin

Lachnopus valgus: Girón et al. 2018: 76 – Pic Paradis, no leg.; Old Fort Hill, no leg.

This species was not in Peck (2011, 2016). It is reported for Anguilla by Ballou (1916: 75) and for St. Barthélemy by Gyllenhal (1834: 41). Both records were recently confirmed by Girón et al. (2018: 76) who also listed St. Martin. Elsewhere present on Puerto Rico, St. John and St. Croix (Girón et al. 2018).

Lachnopus villosipes (Boheman, 1834): 43

St. Eustatius

Lachnopus villosipes (Boheman, 1834): 43 – no locality, JEF

Not listed by Peck (2011, 2016) although the description of this species is based on specimens from St. Eustatius and St. Barthélemy. The types are in the NHRS (NHRS 2001).

Lachnopus Schönherr, 1840: 380

St. Eustatius

Lachnopus species: This study – The Quill, AJW; White Wall, AJW

Girón et al. (2018) recently published an annotated checklist of this genus. They could not resolve the so-called ‘curvipes conflict’, i.e. the fact that the variation in characters of Lachnopus curvipes (Fabricius, 1787b: 113), including the male genitalia, can overlap with those of L. valgus. According to Girón et al. (2018) L. villosipes may also be included in this conflict and a full revision would likely split the genus and synonymise several of the known taxa. As such, two St. Eustatius specimens are listed provisionally here as Lachnopus species.

Litostylus pudens (Boheman, 1833): 623

Saba

Litostylus pudens: Gillett et al. 2014: 2230 – without further data

Litostylus strangulatus (Chevrolat, 1880b): 213

St. Eustatius

Litostylus cf. strangulatus: This study – The Quill, EOC

New provisional record for Eustatius. Beaten from vegetation in a semi-evergreen forest on a relatively wet and steep slope.

Naupactus cervinus Boheman, 1840: 17

Bonaire

Pantomorus cf. fulleri: Werner 1925: 556 – no locality, AG

A widespread, polyphagous, both amphigonic and parthenogenetic reproducing weevil (Germann 2016, Rodriguero et al. 2016) provisionally recorded from Bonaire by K.M. Heller (Werner 1925).

Subfamily LIXINAE Schönherr, 1823: column 1146

Microlarinus lypriformis (Wollaston, 1861): 102

Curaçao

Microlarinus lypriformis: Bennett 1989: 390 – near the airport, FDB

Subfamily MOLYTINAE Schönherr, 1823: column 1142

Acorep Voisin, 1992: 264

St. Eustatius

Acorep species This study – The Quill, AJW; without further data

A single specimen of Acorep was delivered at the Caribbean Netherlands Science Institute on 7-x-2015. The exact location and leg. are unknown. Two other specimens of the same species were collected from moss at the crater rim of the Quill. New genus record for St. Eustatius.

Anchonus magister Faust, 1893: 416

St. Eustatius

Anchonus cf. magister: This study – The Quill, KB

A single specimen of Anchonus sensu Voisin (1992) was collected at light. In the absence of a modern revision and with only the original description available this specimen is provisionally assigned to this species.

Decuanellus Osella, 1977: 399

St. Eustatius

Decuanellus species: This study – The Quill, EOC, MK & AJW

New genus record for St. Eustatius. A single specimen sieved from leaf litter.

Pseudoalaocybites aelleni Osella, 1989: 455

Curaçao

Pseudoalaocybites aelleni Osella, 1989: 455 – Grot van Hato, VA & PS

Endemic to Curaçao.

Subfamily SCOLYTINAE Latreille, 1804: 156

The recent revision of the West Indian members of this group by Bright (2019) has resulted in a large series of new island records, new genera and new species. Except for Hypothenemus hampei and H. obscurus the species listed below are all new for the Dutch Antilles.

Ambrosiodmus hagedorni (Iglesias, 1914): 128 X

Saba

Ambrosiodmus hagedorni: Bright 2019: 252 – Windwardside, Scout’s Place Hotel, DSS; Bud’s Mountain Trail, DEB & BAB

Ivie et al. (2008b) and Peck (2016) listed this species for Montserrat as Ambrosiodmus lecontei (Hopkins, 1915) which is synonymised by Bright (2019).

Araptus insulanus Bright, 2019: 332

Curaçao

Araptus insulanus Bright, 2019: 332 – Carmabi, RHT

Endemic to Curaçao.

Coccotrypes advena Blandford, 1894: 100

Saba

Coccotrypes advena: Bright 2019: 230 – Bottom Mtn. / Troy Trail and Crispeen Trail, DEB & BAB

Coccotrypes carpophagus (Hornung, 1842): 116

Saba

Coccotrypes carpophagus: Bright 2019: 231 – Windwardside, RMB & HBV; Ecolodge on Mt. Scenery, DDS & JAS

Bright (2019) also added Antigua to the range as published by Peck (2016).

Coccotrypes cyperi (Beeson, 1929): 230

Saba

Coccotrypes cyperi: Bright 2019: 232 – Bud’s Mountain Trail, DEB & BAB

Coccotrypes dactyliperda (Fabricius, 1801a ): 387

Saba

Coccotrypes dactyliperda: Bright 2019: 234 – Ecolodge on Mt. Scenery, DDS & JAS; Mt. Scenery Trail “various collectors”

Coccotrypes distinctus (Motschulsky, 1866): 403

Curaçao

Coccotrypes distinctus: Bright 2019: 234 – Piscadera, 0,5 km N Carmabi, MCT

Also present in the northern Leeward Islands on Antigua, Montserrat and Nevis (Bright 2019).

Cryptocarenus heveae (Hagedorn, 1912): 338

Curaçao

Cryptocarenus heveae: Bright 2019: 108 – Playa Santa Cruz Rd., RHT; Playa Kanoa Rd., RHT; Weg naar Playa Kanoa, RHT; Weg naar Playa Kanoa, MCT; Christoffel N.P., North Car Route, MCT; Christoffel Pk., The Woods, RHT; Malpais Trail, RHT; Savonet, RHT

Dryocoetoides capucinus (Eichhoff, 1869): 281

Saba

Dryocoetoides capucinus: Bright 2019: 259 – Sandy Cruz Trailhead nr. Hell’s Gate, DEB & BAB

Bright’s (2019) citation of Eichhoff’s paper is not entirely correct. For the right citation see Wood & Bright (1987) or the literature section below. Listed as Dryocetoides (sic!) capucinus by Peck (2016).

Hypocryphalus mangiferae (Stebbing, 1914): 542

Saba

Hypocryphalus mangiferae: Bright 2019: 112 – Windward side, RMB & HBV; Bottom, Mountain Trail, DEB & BAB; Crispeen Track, near Ecolodge, DEB & BAB

In addition to the range as published by Peck (2016) listed for St. Kitts and Antigua by Bright (2019).

Hypothenemus africanus (Hopkins, 1915): 30

Curaçao

Hypothenemus africanus: Bright 2019: 123 – Piscadera Baai, RHT

Bright (2019) also listed Montserrat for the northern Leeward Islands.

Hypothenemus carinafrons Bright, 2019: 128

Curaçao

Hypothenemus carinafrons Bright, 2019: 128 – Weg naar Playa Kanoa, MCT

Hypothenemus crudiae (Panzer, 1791): 37

Saba

Hypothenemus crudiae: Bright 2019: 131 – Ecolodge on Crispeen Track, DEB & BAB

The name was published on page 37, not 35 as reported in most works including Wood & Bright (1992), Peck (2016) and Bright (2019). Bright (2019) also added the northern Leeward Islands Antigua, Montserrat and Nevis to the range as published by Peck (2016).

Hypothenemus eruditus Westwood, 1834: 34

Saba

Hypothenemus eruditus: Bright 2019: 136 – Bud’s Mountain Trail, DSS & MAI; North Coast Trail Trailhead, DSS & MAI; Spring Bay Trail, DSS & MAI; Mount Scenery Trail, DSS & MAI; Upper Hell’s Gate, DSS & MAI; Bud’s Mountain Trail, DEB & BAB; Crispeen Track, DEB & BAB; Spring Bay Trail, no leg. [probably DSS & JAS]

For the date of publication see Wheeler (1912) and Bright (2019). Bright (2019) also added Antigua to the range as published by Peck (2016) who listed this species as Hypothenemus eruditus and H. plumeriae. The latter was synonymised by Bright (2019).

Hypothenemus exceptus Bright, 2019: 139

Curaçao

Hypothenemus exceptus Bright, 2019: 139 – Piscadera Bay, RHT; Weg naar Playa Kanoa, MCT

Also present on the northern Leeward Islands Redonda and Montserrat. Bright (2019) also listed a specimen under Curaçao with the label “D. Hilburn, 2.x.1987, Paget P.”. However, that record belongs under Bermuda.

Hypothenemus glabratulus (Schedl, 1957): 192

Saba

Hypothenemus glabratulus: Bright 2019: 142 – Crispeen Track, DEB & BAB; Bottom Mountain Trail, DEB & BAB

Bright (2019) also listed Montserrat.

Hypothenemus granulatus Bright, 2019: 144

Curaçao

Hypothenemus granulatus Bright, 2019: 144 – Christoffel Park, Savonet, RHT; Christoffel Park, Northern Route, RHT

Endemic to Curaçao.

Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari, 1867): 12

Aruba

Hypothenemus hampei: Haack 2001: 273 – imported into the USA

A pest of coffee. Introduced but it is unknown if the species has established itself on the island. Not mentioned for Aruba by Bright (2019).

Hypothenemus interstitialis (Hopkins, 1915): 28

Saba

Hypothenemus interstitialis: Bright 2019: 148 – Spring Bay Trail, DSS

Peck (2016) listed this species as Hypothenemus ceibae Hopkins, 1915 which is synonymised by Bright (2019).

Hypothenemus javanus (Eggers, 1908): 216

Curaçao

Hypothenemus javanus: Bright 2019: 150 – Christoffel N.P., North Car Route, MCT; Piscadera Bay, RHT

The page numer of the first description is 216, not 215 as in most publications including Wood & Bright (1992), Peck (2016) and Bright (2019). Bright (2019) added Anguilla and Antigua to the range as published by Peck (2016) who, as well as Ivie et al. (2008b), listed this species for Montserrat as Hypothenemus brunneus Hopkins 1915. The latter was synonymised by Bright (2019).

Hypothenemus leptosquamus Bright, 2019: 152

Curaçao

Hypothenemus leptosquamus Bright, 2019: 152 – Christoffel Park, Savonet, RHT; Santa Rose, RHT; 1,2 km SE Lagun, RHT; Playa Santa Cruz Rd., RHT; Christoffel Park, The Woods, RHT; Malpais Trail, RHT; Playa Parasasa, RHT; Piscadera Bay, RHT

Endemic to Curaçao.

Hypothenemus obscurus (Fabricius, 1801a): 395

Curaçao

Hypothenemus obscurus: Kalshoven 1963: 233 – without further data

Hypothenemus obscurus: Bright 2019: 156 – Santa Rosa, RHT; Piscadera Bay, RHT

Saba

Hypothenemus obscurus: Bright 2019: 156 – S. coast, Giles Quarter Trail, DSS; Bud’s Mountain Trail, DEB & BAB

A pest of several fruits including macadamia nuts, Brazil nuts, nutmeg, tamarind seeds and coffee. Introduced. Bright (2019) also added Antigua to the range as published by Peck (2016).

Hypothenemus parvulosus Bright, 2019: 160

Saba

Hypothenemus parvulosus Bright, 2019: 160 – Sandy Cruz, nr Hell’s Gate, DEB & BAB; Windwardside, Crispeen Trail Trailhead, DEB & BAB

Also present in the northern Leeward Islands on Redonda (Bright 2019).

Hypothenemus ponticus Bright, 2019: 164

Curaçao

Hypothenemus ponticus Bright, 2019: 164 – Carmabi, RHT; Christoffel Park, Orchid Trail Rd., RHT; Christoffel Park, The Woods, RHT; Malpais, Biná Trail, near entrance, MCT

Endemic to Curaçao.

Hypothenemus pubescens Hopkins, 1915: 19

Saba

Hypothenemus pubescens: Bright 2019: 165 – Kelby Rdg. / Spring Bay Trail, no leg.

Bright (2019) also added Anguilla to the range as published by Peck (2016).

Hypothenemus rotundicollis (Eichhoff, 1878a): 385

Curaçao

Hypothenemus rotundicollis: Bright 2019: 167 – Christoffel Park, Zorgvlied Ruins Tr., RHT

Saba

Hypothenemus rotundicollis: Bright 2019: 167 – Trail to Spring Bay Trail, JAS; Trail to Spring Bay Trail, DSS; Kelby Rdg. / Spring Bay Trail, no leg.

Bright (2019) additionally listed Montserrat for the northern Leeward Islands. For the correct citation see Johnson et al. (2020).

Hypothenemus rubrithorax Bright, 2019: 168

Saba

Hypothenemus rubrithorax Bright, 2019: 168 – Ecolodge on Mt. Scenery, DSS & JAS

Known from two female specimens, the holotype from Saba and a paratype from St Vincent.

Hypothenemus vernaculus Bright, 2019: 174

Curaçao

Hypothenemus vernaculus Bright, 2019: 174 – Christoffel Park, Savonet, RHT; Christoffel Park, The Woods, RHT; Malpais, Biná Trail, near entrance, MCT

Endemic to Curaçao. Known from a single female specimen.

Hypothenemus villosus Bright, 2019: 176

St. Eustatius

Hypothenemus villosus Bright, 2019: 176 – Quill Trail to bottom of crater, MAI

Elsewhere known from Puerto Rico and Grenada.

Loganius ficus Schwarz, 1894: 44

Curaçao

Loganius ficus: Bright 2019: 9 – Christoffel Park, North car Route, MCT; Christoffel Park, South car Route, MCT; Weg naar Playa Kanoa, MCT; Christoffel Park, North car Route, RHT; Christoffel Park, South car Route, RHT; Weg naar Playa Kanoa, RHT

Bright (2019) also added St. Kitts to the range as published by Peck (2016) who treated this species as a member of the genus Cnemonyx. The year of publication is 1894, not 1896, as quoted by most previous authors including Bright (2019), Peck (2016) and Wood & Bright (1992), nor 1895 as in Wood (1962).

Loganius vagabundus Wood, 1961: 89

Curaçao

Loganius vagabundus: Bright 2019: 10 – Christoffel Park, North car Route, MCT; Christoffel Park, Northern Route, RHT; Piscadera 0,5 km N Carmabi, MCT; Christoffel Park, Mountain Route, RHT

Bright (2019) added St. Kitts to the range as published by Peck (2011, 2016) who treated this species as a member of the genus Cnemonyx.

Microborus iviei Bright, 2019: 187

Saba

Microborus iviei Bright, 2019: 187 – Ecolodge on Mt. Scenery, DSS & MAI

Also known from Montserrat and Dominica (Bright 2019). Listed in Ivie et al. (2008b) and Peck (2016) as Microborus sp.

Minyotrypetes primus Bright, 2019: 247

Curaçao

Minyotrypetes primus Bright, 2019: 247 – Christoffel Park, RHT

Endemic to Curaçao.

Neocultus thomasi Bright, 2019: 248

Curaçao

Neocultus thomasi Bright, 2019: 248 – Christoffel Park, Copper Mine Tr., RHT; Christoffel N.P., South Car Route, MCT

Endemic to Curaçao.

Phrixosoma antillicum Bright, 2019: 16

[Saba]

Phrixosoma antillicum Bright, 2019: 16 – trail to Mt. Scenery, DSS et al.

Bright (2019) listed a paratype from Saba but did not include the island in the distribution of this species, only mentioning Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.

Pityophthorus minutissimus Bright, 2019: 379

Saba

Pityophthorus minutissimus Bright, 2019: 379 – near Booby Hill, DSS & JAS

Also known from St. Lucia.

Pseudothysanoes cracentis Bright, 2019: 88

Curaçao

Pseudothysanoes cracentis Bright, 2019: 88 – Christoffel Park, Northern Route Cave Trail, RHT; Christoffel Park, Woods, RHT

Endemic to Curaçao.

Pycnarthrum hispidum (Ferrari, 1867): 19

Curaçao

Pycnarthrum hispidum: Bright 2019: 191 – 3,3 km W. Julianadorp, RHT

Saba

Pycnarthrum hispidum: Bright 2019: 191 – Windwardside, RMB & HBV; Scouts Place Hotel, DSS; Junction Bud’s / Mount Scenery Trails, DSS et al.

Bright (2019) also added St. Kitts and Antigua to the range as published by Peck (2016).

Scolytodes glaber (Eichhoff, 1868a): 400

Saba

Scolytodes glaber: Bright 2019: 203 – Windwardside, RMB & HBV; Scouts Place Hotel, DSS; near Booby Hill, DSS & JAS

Listed by Ivie et al. (2008b) and Peck (2016) as Scolytodes schwarzi (Hopkins, 1902). The latter was synonymised by Bright (2019).

Scolytodes pseudobicolor (Eggers, 1940): 132

Saba

Scolytodes pseudobicolor: Bright 2019: 213 – Trail to Spring Bay, 2km, JAS

Listed as a synonym of Scolytodes notatus (Eggers, 1940) by Peck (2016) but the name was resurrected by Bright (2019). Both species were described in 1940, not 1941 as in Peck (2016).

Scolytodes sabaensis Bright, 2019: 215

Saba

Scolytodes sabaensis Bright, 2019: 215 – Sandy Cruz Trail, near Hell’s Gate, DEB & BAB

Endemic to Saba.

Theoborus theobromae Hopkins, 1915: 57

Saba

Theoborus theobromae: Bright 2019: 276 – Ecolodge on Mt. Scenery, DSS & JAS

Bright (2019) also added Montserrat to the range as published by Peck (2016).

Xyleborus affinis Eichhoff, 1868a: 401

Saba

Xyleborus affinis: Bright 2019: 288 – Ecolodge on Mt. Scenery, DSS & JAS

Bright (2019) also added Antigua and St. Kitts to the range as published by Peck (2016), and Blandford (1898: 216) added Nevis to the range as published by Peck (2016) and Bright (2019). Blandford’s record was also quoted by Leng & Mutchler (1914: 480), Blackwelder (1947: 779) and Maes & Martinez (1988: 8).

Xyleborus ferrugineus ( Fabricius, 1801a ): 388

Curaçao

Xyleborus ferrugineus: Bright 2019: 294 – Weg naar Playa Kanoa, MCT; Weg naar Playa Kanoa, RHT; Playa Santa Cruz Rd., RHT; Piscadera Baai, RHT; Christoffel N.P., Copper Mine, MCT

Saba

Xyleborus ferrugineus: Bright 2019: 294 – Windwardside, RMB & HBV; Mt. Scenery Trail, DSS; Ecolodge on Mt. Scenery, DSS & JAS

Bright (2019) also added Nevis and Antigua to the range as published by Peck (2016).

Xyleborus spinulosus Blandford, 1898: 201

Saba

Xyleborus spinulosus: Bright 2019: 301 – Bottom Mtn. Trail, DEB & BAB

Bright (2019) also added Antigua to the range as published by Peck (2016).

Xyleborus volvulus ( Fabricius, 1775): 454

Curaçao

Xyleborus volvulus: Bright 2019: 302 – Christoffel Park, Copper Mine Trail, RHT; Christoffel N.P., Orchard Trail, MCT

Saba

Xyleborus volvulus: Bright 2019: 302 – Windwardside, RMB & HBV; Scout’s Place Hotel, DSS

Leng & Mutchler (1917: 220), followed by Blackwelder (1947: 780), listed Xyleborus perforans (Wollaston, 1857: 96) for St. Kitts, as well as Barbados, St. Vincent and Jamaica. Wood (1979) noted that X. perforans is very similar to, and doubtfully distinct from, X. volvulus and hesitated whether to add X. perforans to the American list or to place it in the synonymy. Peck (2016) wrote that except for a probable misidentification from Barbados, X. perforans is unreported from the New World. Gohli et al. (2016) recently concluded that both are good species which are both present in the New World. However, due to their rather limited dataset at least the evidence on which they based the latter conclusion is not very convincing. As such, it seems best to follow Wood (1979) and Peck (2016) for now and refer American records of X. perforans to X. volvulus until more solid evidence emerges. This also means that St. Kitts should be added to the range as published by Peck (2016). Bright (2019) added Antigua but did not list St. Kitts. He stated that X. perforans and X. volvulus are almost certainly synonymous.

Xylosandrus compactus (Eichhoff, 1876): 201

Saba

Xylosandrus compactus: Bright 2019: 306 – Crispeen Track nr. Ecolodge, DEB & BAB; Mt. Scenery Trail at Mountain road, DEB & BAB

Eichhoff described Xyleborus compactus in the third fascicule of volume 18 of the “Annales de la Société Entomologique de Belgique” which was published in 1876.

Family Incertae Sedis

Cryptophagus forsstromii Gyllenhal, 1808a: 100

St. Eustatius

Cryptophagus Forsströmii Gyllenhal, 1808a: 100 – no locality, JEF

Cryptophagus Forstromi (sic!): Billberg 1820a: 11 – without further data

According to article 32.5.2.1 of the Code (ICZN 1999) a diacritic or other mark in a name should be deleted, except that in a name published before 1985 and based upon a German word, the umlaut sign is deleted from a vowel and the letter “e” is to be inserted after that vowel. Forsström was a Swedish national so Gyllenhal’s name should in this case be corrected to forsstromii. The current taxonomic status of this taxon is unclear. Gyllenhal did not only describe members of the family Cryptophagidae in this genus. The name has later only been used in Billberg’s catalogue (1820a). Billberg’s first collection was burned in 1822 and he subsequently bought the collection of Forsström which was particularly strong with insects from the Antilles. This collection was later deposited at the Natural History Museum in London (Horn & Kahle 1935, Bousquet 2016). However, Smith (1986) also listed material from the Billberg collection as being present in HEC while the type(s) of Cryptophagus forsstromii are also mentioned as being part of the collections of both the UUZM (Wallin 2001, Telenius & Shah 2016) as well as the NHRS (NHRS 2001). This species is not listed by Peck (2011, 2016). Endemic to St. Eustatius?

Dermestes eustatius Linnaeus, 1758: 357

St. Eustatius

Dermestes eustatius Linnaeus, 1758: 357 – no locality, DR

Not listed by Peck (2011, 2016). The type is in Charles de Geer’s collection in NHRS (Dobreff 2010). De Geer (1775) transferred this taxon to his new genus Ips (Scolytinae). Háva (2015) listed it as a Scolytinae but it is unclear if he saw the type(s). Bright (2019) did not mention this taxon. Linnaeus described the species from specimens collected from fungi on St. Eustatius while De Geer (1775) writes that he found a very large number of this species in a mushroom which Rolander sent him from Surinam. It might prove to be a member of the family Ciidae of which several species have been first described in the genus Dermestes. Endemic to St. Eustatius?

Erroneous records for the Dutch Antilles

Family DYTISCIDAE Leach, 1815: 84

Subfamily HYDROPORINAE Aubé, 1836: 14

Neobidessus surinamensis ( Régimbart, 1889): 390

Young (1981: 331) erroneously “corrected” Régimbart’s (1889) type locality “Guyane: Surinam” by stating that the types are from “Boven (Island of Bonaire near Curacao)” thereby referring to Régimbart’s label marked “Neerol vd. Poll, Boven Suriname”. However, Boven Suriname is Dutch for Upper Suriname, the land area along the Upper Suriname River, which stretches inland from the southern shore of Brokopondo, Surinam. Régimbart’s type locality was correct and it is unclear why Young changed it. Nilsson (2001) correctly listed the type locality as “Surinam” but later, without any explanation added “[Bonaire island nr Curacao]” to the locality in his on-line catalogue (Nilsson & Hájek 2018). Neobidessus surinamensis is not part of the Antillean fauna.

Family SCARABAEIDAE Latreille, 1802: 144

Subfamily SCARABAEINAE Latreille, 1802: 144

Coprophanaeus jasius Olivier, 1789a: 109

Olivier (1789a) described Scarabaeus jasius based on specimens from Cayenne and Curaçao (see also Gemminger & von Harold 1869 and Gillet 1911). Arnaud (2002a) considered the types lost and designated a neotype from Cayenne. Arnaud (2002b) nor Edmonds & Zidek (2010) mentioned a Coprophanaeus specimen from Curaçao. According to Hielkema & Hielkema (2019) the inclusion of Curaçao in the distribution of this species is likely based on a mislabeled or misidentified specimen.

Subfamily DYNASTINAE MacLeay, 1819: 64

Tomarus ebenus (De Geer, 1774): 317

A record for St. Martin is based on Bates (1888: 318) who mentioned a specimen from St. Martin in his collection (now in BMNH). Tomarus ebenus is listed for the island by Leng & Mutchler (1914), Blackwelder (1944a), Paulian (1947), Cartwright & Chalumeau (1978) and Peck (2011, 2016) but not by Chalumeau & Gruner (1977), Endrödi (1969, 1985), Ratcliffe (2003), Ratcliffe & Cave (2006, 2015) nor López-García et al. (2016). Unfortunately, none of these authors comment on Bates’ record while his work is listed in the literature sections of all these publications. In the Antilles T. ebenus is known from the southern islands Guadeloupe, Dominica, Martinique and St. Lucia while T. cuniculus is present throughout the Antilles (Ratcliffe & Cave 2015). Bates’ record is probably identified erroneously or based on a mislabeled specimen.

Family COCCINELLIDAE Latreille, 1807: 70

Subfamily COCCINELLINAE Latreille, 1807: 70

Mulsantina labyrinthica (Sicard, 1929): 517/

Procula ferruginea (Olivier, 1808b ): 991

Both species were listed by Duverger (2001) for St. Martin but Nicolas (2012) questioned these records. Both are Greater Antillean species.

Family TENEBRIONIDAE Latreille, 1802: 165

Subfamily OPATRINAE Brullé, 1832: 213

Blapstinus fortis LeConte, 1878: 420

Ivie & Hart (2016: 463) suspected a single specimen from St. Martin in the Hungarian Natural History Museum (N of Cupecoy Bay, PWH) to be mislabeled. According to them the range of Blapstinus fortis is restricted to Central America, Grand Bahama, Andros, New Providence, Cuba, Isla de Juventud and Grand Cayman.

Diastolinus clathratus (Fabricius, 1792b): 109

Listed for St. Martin by several authors but this species is endemic to St. Croix (Hart & Ivie 2016).

Diastolinus clavatus Mulsant & Rey, 1859: 91

Listed for St. Martin, St. Barthélemy and Nevis by several authors but this species is a Puerto Rican Bank endemic (Hart & Ivie 2016).

Diastolinus mulsanti Marcuzzi & d’Aguilar, 1971: 79

This taxon was synonymised with Diastolinus clavatus by Hart & Ivie (2016). However, previous records of D. mulsanti from St. Martin (Marcuzzi 2001: 251, Soldati & Touroult 2014: 99) belong to D. perforatus (Hart & Ivie 2016).

Diastolinus puncticollis Mulsant & Rey, 1859: 83

This taxon was synonymised with Xerolinus sallei by Ivie & Hart (2016). However, all previous records of Diastolinus puncticollis listed for Saba and St. Eustatius belong to D. leewardensis.

Diastolinus realinoi Marcuzzi, 2002: 398

Marcuzzi wrote that the single specimen on which his description was based (Curaçao, BMR) had possibly been transported by ship from Cuba to Curaçao. Ivie & Hart (2016) could not investigate the type for their revision of Diastolinus. Their request to RMNH did not seem to have reached the right person. However, even if it had the result would have been the same. In 1995 Marcuzzi loaned 298 specimens of unidentified Tenebrionidae from the Zoological Museum Amsterdam (now part of RMNH) which were never returned. The type of Diastolinus realinoi was among these. The current whereabouts of the specimens are unclear (Huijbregts pers. comm. 2017). Marcuzzi’s collection is now in Museo Civico di Storia Naturale “Giacomo Doria”, Genova (Ivie in litt. 2020) and the type might be available there.

Xerolinus sallei (Mulsant & Rey, 1859): 80

All previous records from Saba and St. Eustatius (as Diastolinus sallei) belong to D. leewardensis (Hart & Ivie 2016).

Subfamily TENEBRIONINAE Latreille, 1802: 165

Helops martinensis Marcuzzi, 2001: 252 (nomen nudum)

Description based on a single specimen in the collection Soldati and the only known specimen of this genus from the Antilles. Marcuzzi, notorious for his carelessness (see also Ivie & Hart 2016 and above under Diastolinus realinoi), erroneously listed two different collection dates and initials for the leg. in his description: Oyster Pond, 10-vii-1994, C. Donneuve and 10-i-1994, P. Donneuve. Soldati & Touroult 2014: 103 seem to correct this, presumably based on the label, to 10-i-1994 and P. Donneuve. Marcuzzi (2001) failed to indicate where the syntypes were deposited, a mandatory requirement for every new species name published after 1999 (ICZN 1999: Article 16.4.2). As such, the name is a nomen nudum (see also Bousquet et al. 2018). It is striking that Marcuzzi (2001) specifically mentioned the fact that “this is the first discovery of a Helops in the Antilles, since the presence of a Helops at Puerto Rico (Wolcott 1936) is doubtful”…“it was never collected again and never identified” (see also Wolcott 1951). The same now seems to apply to his description.

Family CURCULIONIDAE Latreille, 1802: 195

Subfamily SCOLYTINAE Latreille, 1804: 156

Xylosandrus compactus (Eichhoff, 1876): 201

This invasive species is listed for Curaçao in several publications, which all refer to the on-line CABI Invasive Species Compendium (CABI 2020). However, this database refers to Vázquez & Monteagudo (1988) as its source but that paper describes the first discovery of Xylosandrus compactus on Cuba (see also Bright & Skidmore 2002). We assume that there has been an entry error using a drop-down list in the database: Curaçao instead of Cuba.

Annotations to Peck’s checklists for the other northern Leeward Islands

While working on the catalogue, Peck’s (2011, 2016) data for the non-Dutch northern Leeward Islands Anguilla, Antigua, Barbuda, Montserrat, Nevis, St. Barthélemy and St. Kitts were also critically reviewed. Additions or corrections to the listings for these islands of species that are also present on the Dutch Antilles were dealt with above. Additions or corrections to the records of species which are not part of the Dutch Antillean fauna are listed in this paragraph.

Family CARABIDAE Latreille, 1802: 80

Subfamily HARPALINAE Bonelli, 1810: Tabula synoptica

Selenophorus parvus Darlington, 1934: 105

Shpeley et al. (2017: 154) added Barbuda to the range as published by Peck (2016).

Family DYTISCIDAE Leach, 1815: 84

Subfamily COPELATINAE Branden, 1885: 82

Copelatus posticatus (Fabricius, 1801b): 268

Bass (2006: 33) listed this species (as Copelatus postcatus sic!) for St. Kitts and Nevis. Although Peck (2011, 2016) referred to Bass’ paper neither of the two islands was in his list.

Subfamily COLYMBETINAE Erichson, 1837: 149

Meridiorhantus calidus (Fabricius, 1792b): 193

Peck (2011, 2016) listed St. Kitts and Nevis but without the asterisk indicating a new island record in his paper. We have not been able to find an earlier publication mentioning these islands. It might have been mixed up with the species mentioned above. The generic classification here follows Balke et al. (2017).

Subfamily DYTISCINAE Leach, 1815: 84

Megadytes lherminieri (Guérin, 1829): pl. 8

This species is listed in Peck (2011, 2016) as Megadytes giganteus (Laporte, 1835): 99 which is a junior synonym. Megadytes lherminieri is usually attributed to Laporte (1835: 99) but the description was first published by Guérin on plate 8 in his “Iconographie du règne animal de G. Cuvier”. For the date of publication and use of the name “Guérin” instead of “Guérin-Méneville” see Cowan (1971), Low et al. (2013) and Bousquet (2016).

Family HYDROPHILIDAE Latreille, 1802: 136

Subfamily HYDROPHILINAE Latreille, 1802: 136

Hydrophilus ensifer Brullé 1837: 52

A record for Antigua on GBIF based on a specimen in FMNH identified by Spangler (Grant & Turcatel 2020) is an addition to the range as published by Peck (2016). Also listed for St. Croix by Miskimen & Bond (1970, as Hydrophilus intermedius), an island not mentioned by Peck (2016).

Tropisternus apicipalpis (Chevrolat, 1835) (no pagination, [species no. 54])

Spangler (1960: 229) listed Antigua, an island not mentioned by Peck (2011, 2016). For the year of publication of this species see Bousquet (2016).

Tropisternus chalybeus Laporte, 1840: 53

Antigua and Nevis are not in Peck (2016) but are listed by d’Orchymont (1921: 364) and Spangler (1960: 235), respectively.

Family HISTERIDAE Gyllenhal, 1808d: 74

Subfamily ABRAEINAE MacLeay, 1819: 25

Acritus analis LeConte, 1853b: 290

A record in GBIF from St. Kitts in FMNH identified by Rupert L. Wenzel (Grant & Turcatel 2020) is an addition to the range as published by Peck (2016). Known elsewhere in the Antilles from Cuba and Puerto Rico (Peck 2005: 52). Peck (2016) mentioned several unnamed specimens in this genus from Antigua, Barbados, Grenada, Nevis and St. Vincent.

Acritus ignobilis (Lewis, 1888): 238

Two records in GBIF from St. Kitts and Antigua in FMNH identified by Rupert L. Wenzel (Grant & Turcatel 2020) are additions to the range as published by Peck (2016). A widespread species which is also present on Cuba, Puerto Rico (Peck 2005: 52) and Guadeloupe (Grant & Turcatel 2020) in the Antilles and elsewhere in Florida, Panama, Colombia (Peck 2005), Venezuela, Bolivia and Brazil (among others Grant & Turcatel 2020).

Subfamily DENDROPHILINAE Reitter, 1909: 288

Paromalus hispaniolae Marseul 1870: 101

Several specimens from Antigua identified by Wenzel on GBIF (Grant & Turcatel 2020) which are probably the specimens listed by Peck (2016: 53) as undetermined Paromalus.

Subfamily HISTERINAE Gyllenhal, 1808d: 74

Atholus confinis (Erichson, 1834): 154

A record in GBIF of a specimen in FMNH from St. Kitts identified by Rupert L. Wenzel (Grant & Turcatel 2020) is an addition to the range as published by Peck (2016).

Omalodes laevigatus ( Quensel, 1806 ): 90

The type locality of this species is St. Barthélemy, an island that was not listed by Peck (2011, 2016). There also exists a record of Omalodes sp. aff. laevigatus from St. Kitts (Alam 1990: 171).

Family STAPHYLINIDAE Latreille, 1802: 124

Subfamily PIESTINAE Erichson, 1839: 31

Piestus penicillatus (Dalman, 1821): 375

The record of this species for St. Barthélemy (Peck 2011, 2016) is based on an error in Erichson (1840: 834) repeated by almost all subsequent authors. Erichson referred to the original description by Dalman (1821) for the St. Barthélemy record but Dalman described Piestus penicillatus based on material collected on Guadeloupe by Forsström. Blackwelder (1943) noted the error but later failed to correct it in his checklist (Blackwelder 1944a). Blackwelder (1943) also wrote that there had been much confusion concerning this species and that records from Mexico and Brazil were questionable. According to him the only unquestioned records were those from the Antilles. Scheerpeltz (1952) later included Mexico and Brazil in the range again and, without any clarification, added the Guyanas. Navarrete-Heredia et al. (2002) considered P. penicillatus an Antillean species, as did Caron et al. (2012) in their revision of the genus. Piestus penicillatus is probably a widespread Antilles endemic present on Cuba, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Hispaniola, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, St. Lucia, Tobago and Trinidad (Blackwelder 1943) but not in the northern Leeward Islands.

Family SCARABAEIDAE Latreille, 1802: 144

Subfamily APHODIINAE Leach, 1815: 97

Ataenius beattyi Chapin, 1940a: 17

Chalumeau (1977: 235) recorded this species from St. Barthélemy, an island not listed by Peck (2011, 2016).

Ataenius picinus Harold, 1867b: 281

An additional record to Peck (2016) for St. Kitts on GBIF from UWIC (Rutherford & Auguste 2018a).

Subfamily DYNASTINAE MacLeay, 1819: 64

Cyclocephala melanocephala (Fabricius, 1775): 36

Endrödi (1966: 258) was the only one who listed St. Barthélemy for this species. His records are probably erroneous or based on mislabeled specimens.

Cyclocephala tridentata (Fabricius, 1801a): 170

Ratcliffe & Cave (2015) synonymised Cyclocephala tridentatus dominicensis Cartwright & Chalumeau, 1978: 25 and C. annamariae Dutrillaux et al. 2013: 64 with this species which makes it a Lesser Antilles endemic. They also added Montserrat to the range as published by Peck (2016).

Dyscinetus picipes (Burmeister, 1847): 79

Barbuda is a new Lesser Antillean island record added by Ratcliffe & Cave (2015: 133).

Subfamily CETONIINAE Leach, 1815: 99

Cetonia carthami Gory & Percheron, 1835: 243

Listed as introduced on St. Barthélemy by Questel (2018: 18). It is not clear if vouchers are available.

Protaetia fusca (Herbst, 1790): 257

Peck (2016) listed this species for St. Barthélemy without reference to a publication. It is possibly based on Questel & Le Quellec (2012) or Questel (2014: 22). It is not clear if vouchers are available (see also Meurgey, 2017).

Family ELATERIDAE Leach, 1815: 85

Subfamily DENTICOLLINAE Stein & Weise, 1877: 96

Hemicrepidius hemipodus (Say, 1826): 254

This is an east North-American and not an Antillean species. It was listed as common on Antigua by Marshall (1878: xxx, as Asaphes decoloratus). His account was the reason why Leng & Mutchler (1917: 205), followed by Blackwelder (1944b: 293), include Antigua in the range of this species. Peck (2011, 2016) omitted these records in his checklists but without comment. Nolan (1913) provided exact dates of publication for the “Journal of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia” between 1817 and 1845. Say’s description was published in November 1826.

Subfamily ELATERINAE Leach, 1815: 85

Glyphonyx quadraticollis Champion, 1896b: 536

Leng & Mutchler (1914: 428) were the first to list Glyphonyx quadraticollis as part of the Antiguan fauna. Their record is probably based on Champion (1896b) in the Biologia Centrali-Americana which they mentioned as one of their sources. However, Champion clearly listed the place name “Antigua” as part of a series of locations in Guatemala and not as the Caribbean island. This error was repeated by Blackwelder 1944b: 296, Peck 2011: 26 and Peck 2016: 106 and is also made for several other species on GBIF. Glyphonyx quadraticollis is not part of the Antillean fauna.

Family CANTHARIDAE Imhoff, 1856: 69

Subfamily CANTHARINAE Imhoff, 1856: 69

Tylocerus crassicornis ( Dalman, 1823): 57

See Ivie & Geiser (2014) for the confusion over this species’ geographic provenance which, without any proof, included St. Barthélemy according to some authors. Constantin et al. (2017) recently discovered a specimen from Martinique, the only record of certain provenance. Tylocerus crassicornis is not part of the fauna of the northern Leeward Islands.

Family ANOBIIDAE Fleming, 1821: 50

Subfamily PTININAE Latreille, 1802: 112

Oviedinus dufaui (Pic, 1906): 21 and Oviedinus strangulatus (Fall, 1905): 120

Both species were included in the genus Ptinus by Peck (2016). Bellés (2010) described the genus Oviedinus for the “Ptinus semiobscurus group” as defined by Bellés (1986), which includes these two species.

Family CLERIDAE Latreille, 1802: 110

Subfamily ENOPLIINAE Gistel, 1848a: [6]

Pelonium fuscum Opitz, 2018: 464

First mentioned as Pelonium sp. nov. by Ivie et al. (2008b) from Montserrat and listed as such by Peck (2016). Also present on Guadeloupe (Opitz 2018).

Family COCCINELLIDAE Latreille, 1807: 70

Subfamily STICHOLOTIDINAE Weise, 1901: 430

Delphastus nebulosus Chapin, 1940b: 264

Listed for Nevis by Kairo et al. (2001: 48N), an island not listed by Peck (2011, 2016). It is not clear if vouchers are available.

Subfamily SCYMNINAE Mulsant, 1846: 189

Cryptognatha nodiceps Marshall, 1912: 321

Introduced as early as 1937 on Antigua (Cock 1985: 17). Later, in 1970, repeatedly introduced to control the coconut scale Aspidiotus destructor Signoret, 1869 (Hemiptera) on St. Kitts and Nevis with reported establishment on both islands (Cock 1985: 20, van Lenteren & Bueno 2020: 407). None of these islands are listed by Peck (2011, 2016). It is not clear if vouchers are available.

Decadiomus austrinus (Gordon, 1976): 341

Listed as Diomus austrinus by Peck (2016) but recently transferred to Decadiomus (Vandenberg & Hanson 2019).

Diomus thoracicus ( Fabricius, 1801a): 378

Included as native on St. Kitts in Cock (1985: 55), an island not mentioned by Peck (2016). It is not clear if vouchers are available.

Hyperaspis jucunda Mulsant, 1850: 608

Introduced in 1971 from Trinidad and Tobago to St. Kitts (van Lenteren & Bueno 2020: 407). It is not clear if the species has established itself and if vouchers are available.

Hyperaspis trilineata Mulsant, 1850: 667

Mentioned as having been introduced in 1958 on St. Kitts. In 1966 recoveries were made and in 1967 it was widespread but not island-wide (Cock 1985: 55, van Lenteren & Bueno 2020: 411). Its current status is unknown and it is unclear if vouchers are available.

Rhyzobius fagus (Broun, 1880): 648 / Rhyzobius pulchellus (Montrouzier, 1861): 306

Probably only one of these Australian species, presumably Rhyzobius fagus, was introduced to control coconut scale. Cock (1985) listed “R. satelles (as R. pulchellus)” (= R. fagus) in table 3 on page 16 as being introduced to St. Kitts (in 1970–1973), Montserrat (1970) and St. Lucia (1971) but in the text on page 19 and 20 he only listed R. pulchellus, as being introduced to respectively Montserrat (1971) and St. Lucia (1971). It is not clear if it has established itself and if vouchers are available. Peck (2011, 2016) did not list a Rhyzobius species for the Lesser Antilles.

Rhyzobius lophanthae (Blaisdell, 1892): 51

Another Australian species, which was introduced in 1973 to control coconut scale on St. Kitts (Cock 1985: 16). It is not clear if the species has established itself and if vouchers are available. Not listed by Peck (2011, 2016).

Scymnus coccivora Ramakrishna Aiyar, 1925: 491

Peck (2016) only listed St. Kitts. According to Sagarra & Peterkin (1999) it was also introduced on Montserrat. It is not clear if the species has established itself and if vouchers are available. Ivie et al. (2008b) mentioned a Scymnus (Pullus) sp. from Montserrat which might be this species.

Subfamily COCCINELLINAE Latreille, 1807: 70

Coelophora inaequalis ( Fabricius, 1775 ): 80

A record from Anguilla on iNaturalist (Roy 2020) is an addition to Peck (2016). Introduced.

Family CIIDAE Leach, 1819b: 206

Subfamily CIINAE Leach, 1819b: 206

Ceracis furcifer Mellié, 1849: 379

Pecci-Maddalena & Lopes-Andrade (2017: 19) recently added Antigua to the range of this species as published by Peck (2016). For the date of publication see Evenhuis (2016).

Family COLYDIIDAE Billberg, 1820b: 394

Endeitoma granulata (Say, 1826): 266

Listed as Asynchita granulata (Say, 1826) by Peck (2016) but see Ivie et al. (2016). The year of publication of this species is often quoted as 1827, probably because this is the date on the cover. However, Nolan (1913) provides exact dates of publication for the “Journal of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia” between 1817 and 1845. Say’s description was published in November 1826.

Family TENEBRIONIDAE Latreille, 1802: 165

Subfamily PIMELLINAE Latreille, 1802: 166

Ortheolus antillarum (Champion, 1896a): 5

A record for St. Barthélemy by Questel (2018: 18) is an addition to the range as published by Peck (2016). It is not clear if vouchers are available. The reference to page number 4 of Champion (1896a) in Peck (2016) is probably a typo.

Subfamily OPATRINAE Brullé, 1832: 213

Blapstinus dominicus Marcuzzi, 1962: 34

Added to the northern Lesser Antillean fauna by Ivie & Hart (2016: 463) based on its occurrence on Anguilla.

Diastolinus coarctatus (Mulsant & Rey, 1859): 106

Listings of this species (as Sellio coarctatus) for St. Kitts belong to Diastolinus leewardensis (Hart & Ivie 2016).

Diastolinus costipennis Mulsant & Rey, 1859: 85

This taxon was synonymised with Xerolinus sallei by Ivie & Hart (2016). However, all previous records from St. Kitts belong to Diastolinus leewardensis (Hart & Ivie 2016).

Diastolinus puncticollis Mulsant & Rey, 1859: 83

This taxon was synonymised with Xerolinus sallei by Ivie & Hart (2016). Except for the records for Anguilla, all previous records listed for the northern Lesser Antilles belong to Diastolinus leewardensis. The Anguillan records are D. perforatus (Hart & Ivie 2016).

Xerolinus sallei (Mulsant & Rey, 1859): 80

Except for the records for Anguilla, all previous records listed for the northern Lesser Antilles (as Diastolinus sallei) belong to D. leewardensis. The Anguillan records are D. perforatus (Hart & Ivie 2016).

Subfamily COELOMETOPINAE Lacordaire, 1859: 358

Cyrtosoma lherminieri (Guérin-Méneville, 1844): 123

Ivie et al. (2008b) attributed the Montserrat records listed in Leng & Mutchler (1917) to an undescribed species but that was later corrected in Spiessberger & Ivie (2018) who referred two female 19th-century specimens collected by H.G. Hubbard on the island to this species. Both specimens are now in USNM.

Family OEDEMERIDAE Latreille, 1810: 216

Subfamily OEDEMERINAE Latreille, 1810: 216

Oxycopis vittata (Fabricius, 1775): 125

Listed for St. Barthélemy by Questel (2018: 17). It is not clear if vouchers are available.

Family CERAMBYCIDAE Latreille, 1802: 211

Subfamily CERAMBYCINAE Latreille, 1802: 211

Chlorida festiva (Linnaeus, 1758): 389

Touroult (2012, Annexe I), followed by Peck (2016), was the first to list St. Kitts for this species. However, the entry is not in bold as are the other new island records in his table and he does not mention Antigua where this species is present. Julien Touroult kindly checked his collection and there is no voucher for Saba there (Touroult 2020 in litt). Although it is certainly possible that Chlorida festiva is present on St. Kitts, this particular record is probably a typographic error.

Elaphidion antiguensis Vlasak, 2019: 442

Recently described based on specimens from Antigua.

Stizocera vanzwaluwenburgi Fisher, 1932: 46

A record from Anguilla on iNaturalist (Bourque 2019) is an addition to the range of this species as published by Peck (2016).

Family BRUCHIDAE Latreille, 1802: 192

Subfamily BRUCHINAE Latreille, 1802: 192

Callosobruchus chinensis (Linnaeus, 1758): 386

Fennah (1947: 110) listed Antigua, an island not listed in Peck (2011, 2016). It is not clear if vouchers are available.

Stator monachus ( Sharp, 1885 ): 471

Romero & Johnson (2004: 628) mentioned “St. Kitts and Nevis”, both islands that are not listed by Peck (2011, 2016). It is not clear if this species occurs on both islands or on only one of these. Romero & Johnson’s records are based on “labels of specimens in many of the larger collections of bruchids”.

Family CHRYSOMELIDAE Latreille, 1802: 220

Subfamily GALERUCINAE Latreille, 1802: 228

Acalymma innubum (Fabricius, 1775): 117

Two specimens from Antigua on GBIF from UWIC (Rutherford & Auguste 2018b) are additions to the range as published by Peck (2016).

Disonycha leptolineata Blatchley, 1917: 143

Questel (2014: 19) listed Disonycha glabrata (Fabricius, 1781): 156 for St. Barthélemy but later seemed to correct this to D. leptolineata (Questel 2018: 17). It is not clear if vouchers are available. Hitherto the only Disonycha species known in the region is D. spilotrachela (see above).

Subfamily CRYPTOCEPHALINAE Gyllenhal, 1813: 582

Cryptocephalus irroratus Suffrian, 1852: 32

Questel (2018: 17) listed this species as introduced to St. Barthélemy. This species is not mentioned by Peck (2011, 2016). It is not clear if vouchers are available.

Family BRENTIDAE Billberg, 1820a: 40

Subfamily BRENTINAE Billberg, 1820a: 40

Brentus anchorago (Linnaeus, 1758): 383

Listed by Questel (2018: 16) for St. Barthélemy. This species is not mentioned by Peck (2011, 2016). It is not clear if vouchers are available.

Family CURCULIONIDAE Latreille, 1802: 195

Subfamily DRYOPHTHORINAE Schönherr, 1825: column 588

Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar, 1823 ): 299

Ballou (1918: 379) reported its first occurrence on Antigua, an island not listed by Peck (2011, 2016). It is not clear if Ballou’s record was based on vouchers. For the year of publication see Bousquet (2016).

Rhinostomus scrutator (Olivier, 1807): 233

A specimen found “on dried herbs” in a parcel-post package from Montserrat intercepted on December 6, 1938, in Boston is listed by Vaurie (1970). She added that it was an unusual record and that the species was probably not established on the island.

Subfamily CURCULIONINAE Latreille, 1802: 195

Anthonomus argentatus Gyllenhal, 1835c: 343

Not in Peck (2011, 2016) although described based on specimens from St. Barthélemy and listed by several authors including Leng & Mutchler (1914: 472), Blackwelder (1947: 838), O’Brien & Wibmer (1982: 106) and Clark (1990: 568).

Huaca pacha Clark, 1993: 11

Peck (2011, 2016) listed both Nevis and St. Kitts. We have not been able to find an earlier published record for Nevis. Clark described Huaca pacha based on two female specimens from St. Kitts (Philips Level, L.D. Coote; Bakers Ghut, L.D. Coote). A single-island endemic.

Subfamily CRYPTORHYNCHINAE Schönherr, 1825: column 585

Coelosternus balteatus Sahlberg, 1823: 50

Not in Peck (2011, 2016) although described based on specimens from St. Barthélemy and listed by several authors including Leng & Mutchler (1914: 475), Blackwelder (1947: 865) and O’Brien & Wibmer (1982: 152).

Euscepes postfasciatus (Fairmaire, 1849): 513

Myers (1931: 145, as Euscepes batatae) listed Montserrat, an island not mentioned by Peck (2011, 2016). It is not clear if vouchers are available.

Neoulosomus erinaceus (Schönherr, 1826): 294

Not in Peck (2011, 2016) although described based on specimens from St. Barthélemy and listed by several authors including Leng & Mutchler (1914: 474), Blackwelder (1947: 862) and O’Brien & Wibmer (1982: 143).

Subfamily ENTIMINAE Schönherr, 1823: column 1138

Myllocerus undecimpustulatus Faust, 1891: 266

An invasive weevil native to Sri Lanka. It was first found in the New World in 2000 in Florida (O’Brien et al. 2006), in 2016 followed by the Cayman Islands (Malumphy et al. 2018). Questel (2018) listed it for St. Barthélemy. It is not clear if vouchers are available.

Subfamily LIXINAE Schönherr, 1823: column 1146

Microlarinus lareynii (Jacquelin du Val, 1852): 714

Bennett (1971: 371) mentioned the introduction of this species on St. Kitts in 1968 as a biological control agent against the annual herb puncture vine (Tribulus cistoides). However, it did not seem to have succeeded in establishing itself on the island. Weevils were recovered in April, but none were recovered in October 1969 and in limited samplings in March 1971 (Bennett 1971, van Lenteren & Bueno 2020: 415).

Microlarinus lypriformis (Wollaston, 1861): 102

Listed by Peck (2011, 2016) for the Antilles from the Bahamas, Curaçao, Jamaica, Puerto Rico and St. Kitts. Cock (1985: 116) and van Lenteren & Bueno (2020: 415) also mentioned the introduction of this species on Nevis in 1968 as a biological control agent against the annual herb puncture vine (Tribulus cistoides). It established itself but the puncture vine stand on Nevis airport was later destroyed when the runway was enlarged. This may have eradicated the weevil population on the island (Bennett 1989). The current status of both weed and weevil on Nevis are unknown (Winston et al. 2014).

Subfamily SCOLYTINAE Latreille, 1804: 156

Ambrosiodmus devexulus (Wood, 1978): 398

Bright (2019: 252) noted that there is no voucher for the record for Montserrat in Ivie et al. (2008b) which was also listed by Peck (2016).

Ambrosiodmus obliquus (LeConte, 1878): 432

Bright (2019: 255) added Montserrat to the range as published by Peck (2016).

Araptus hymenaea (Eggers, 1933): 9

Bright (2019: 329) added Montserrat to the range as published by Peck (2016) who listed it as mentioned as an unidentified Araptus by Ivie et al. (2008b).

Araptus ineditus Bright, 2019: 331

This species is present on the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Montserrat and Dominica. Ivie et al. (2008b) and Peck (2016) listed it as an unidentified Araptus.

Chramesus opacicollis Eggers, 1940: 124

Bright (2019: 40) added Montserrat to the range as published by Peck (2016) who mentioned it as listed as an unidentified Chramesus in Ivie et al. (2008b).

Chramesus squamosus Bright, 2019: 44

Endemic to Montserrat. Listed as an unidentified Chramesus in Ivie et al. (2008b) and Peck (2016).

Cladoctonus interruptus (Eggers, 1940): 126

Bright (2019: 47) added Antigua and Montserrat to the range as published by Peck (2016). Listed for Montserrat by Ivie et al. (2008b) and Peck (2016) as Cladoctonus sp.

Cnesinus brevisetosus Bright, 2019: 24

Endemic to Montserrat. Listed as Cnesinus sp. by Ivie et al. (2008b).

Cnesinus guadeloupensis Eggers, 1940: 137

Bright (2019: 24) added Montserrat to the range as published by Peck (2016). Listed as Cnesinus sp. by Ivie et al. (2008b).

Coccotrypes robustus Eichhoff, 1878a: 391

A record from Antigua for a species elsewhere known from the Greater Antilles and the Bahamas (Bright 2019: 239). A species not listed by Peck (2016).

Corthylus tuberculatus Eggers, 1940: 140

Bright (2019: 406) added Montserrat to the range as published by Peck (2016).

Cryptocarenus seriatus Eggers, 1933: 10

Bright (2019: 110) added Antigua to the range as published by Peck (2016).

Dendrocranulus fulgens Bright, 2019: 245

This species occurs on Montserrat and Martinique (Bright 2019).

Dryocoetoides cristatus (Fabricius, 1801a): 389

Bright (2019: 260) added Montserrat to the range as published by Peck (2016) who listed this species as Dryocetoides (sic!) cristatus.

Gymnochilus insularis (Eggers, 1932): 232

Listed as Gymnochilus reitteri (Eichhoff, 1878a: 388) in Ivie et al. (2008b) and Peck (2016) (Bright 2019: 184). Note that the citation for Egger’s paper in Bright (2019) referred to volume 48 of the “Wiener Entomologische Zeitung”. This should be volume 49. For the correct citation for G. reitteri see Johnson et al. (2020).

Hylocurus anomala Bright, 2019: 74

Endemic to Montserrat. Mentioned as unidentified Hylocurus spp. in Ivie et al. (2008b) and Peck (2016).

Hypothenemus californicus Hopkins, 1915: 19

Bright (2019: 127) added Antigua to the range as published by Peck (2016).

Hypothenemus collinus Bright, 2019: 129

This species occurs on Montserrat and St. Lucia (Bright 2019).

Hypothenemus erectus LeConte, 1876: 356

Bright (2019: 29) added Montserrat to the range as published by Peck (2016). Specimens of this species from Montserrat were listed as Hypothenemus birmanus (Eichhoff, 1878a: 384) in Ivie et al. (2008b). However, Bright (2019) concluded that the characters hitherto used to distinguish the two species are all extremely variable and cannot be used to distinguish them. As such, he considered all New World identifications of the Old World tropical H. birmanus misidentifications. However, Bright added that further research might show that the two taxa are synonymous. For the correct citation see Johnson et al. (2020).

Hypothenemus fuscicollis (Eichhoff, 1878a): 386

Listed for Montserrat by Ivie et al. (2008b) and Peck (2016) as Hypothenemus comosus Bright, 1972: 50 which was synonymised by Bright (2019: 140). According to Bright (2019) no vouchers exist for this island record. For the correct citation see Johnson et al. (2020).

Hypothenemus gossypii (Hopkins, 1915): 25

Listed by Ivie et al. (2008b) and Peck (2016) for Montserrat but most likely based on a misidentification. Until authentic species are available this island record should be ignored (Bright 2019).

Hypothenemus obscurifrons Bright, 2019: 155

This species is present on Antigua, the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico (Bright 2019).

Hypothenemus opacus (Eichhoff, 1872): 132

Ivie et al. (2008b) listed a specimen of Hypothenemus dolosus Wood, 1974 from Montserrat. Bright (2019: 159) synonymised this taxon with H. opacus. He referred to Ivie’s record for Montserrat but noted that this is a literature record and there is no voucher available. Elsewhere, known from Cuba, Dominican Republic, Jamaica and Puerto Rico.

Hypothenemus pygmaeomorphus Bright, 2019: 166

Endemic to Montserrat (Bright 2019).

Hypothenemus setiferous Bright, 2019: 169

Endemic to Montserrat (Bright 2019).

Monarthrum antillicum Bright, 2019: 416

This species occurs on Montserrat, Guadeloupe and Dominica (Bright 2019).

Pagiocerus frontalis (Fabricius, 1801a): 389

Bright (2019: 29) added St. Kitts to the range as published by Peck (2016).

Pityophthorus laevis ( Schedl, 1938): 181

A specimen from Montserrat (Bright 2019: 375). A species not listed by Peck (2016).

Pityophthorus pauculus Bright, 2019: 380

New species from Montserrat and St. Lucia (Bright 2019).

Pityophthorus subconcentralis Schedl, 1938: 183

A specimen from Montserrat (Bright 2019: 387). An addition to the range as published by Peck (2016).

Premnobius cavipennis Eichhoff, 1878b: 404

Bright (2019: 249) added St. Kitts to the range as published by Peck (2016).

Pseudothysanoes lautus Bright, 2019: 92

New species from Antigua, Montserrat and Guadeloupe. Listed as Pseudothysanoes sp. for Montserrat by Ivie et al. (2008b) and Peck (2016).

Pseudothysanoes minutissimus Bright, 2019: 96

Endemic to Montserrat. Listed as an unidentified Pseudothysanoes in Ivie et al. (2008b) and Peck (2016).

Pycnarthrum pallidum (Chapuis, 1869): 41

Bright (2019: 193) added Antigua to the range as published by Peck (2016).

Scolytodes iviei Bright, 2019: 204

New species from Antigua, Montserrat, St. Kitts and Guadeloupe. Listed as Scolytodes sp. for Montserrat by Ivie et al. (2008b).

Scolytogenes jalappae (Letzner, 1849): 99

The year of publication should be 1849, not 1848 as mentioned in most publications including Wood & Bright (1992), Wood (2007) and Bright (2019). Bright (2019: 180) added Antigua and Montserrat to the range as published by Peck (2016) who listed this species as Scolytogenes knabi (Hopkins, 1915: 34). The latter taxon was synonymised with S. jalappae by Wood (2007).

Xyleborinus gracilis (Eichhoff, 1868b): 145

Bright (2019: 281) added Montserrat to the range as published by Peck (2016).

Xyleborus bispinatus Eichhoff, 1868b: 146

A specimen from Montserrat (Bright 2019: 291) but Bright noted that this species is doubtfully distinct from Xyleborus ferrugineus (see above under the species from the Dutch islands).

We would like to thank Jeroen van der Brugge, Thijs van den Burg, Marijke Kanters, Hannah Madden, Ellen van Norren, Wesley Overman, Rens Vogel, Sil Westra and Ambrosius van Zanten for collecting beetles outside the plots during the St. Eustatius Scientific Terrestrial Expedition. The librarians of Naturalis Biodiversity Center and the Netherlands Entomological Society were of great help during the literature research. The help of Rafael Braga (Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro) with identifying a female Thermonectus is highly appreciated. Ron Beenen (Naturalis Biodiversity Center) contributed several records from Bonaire and Jaap Winkelman and Dré Teunissen (both EIS) donated their collections of beetles from Bonaire and Curaçao, respectively. Mike Ivie, Fortuné Chalumeau and Julien Touroult (Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle) provided valuable information and photos. The St. Eustatius National Parks Foundation (STENAPA) provided the collecting permits for the 2015 St. Eustatius Expedition. Oscar Vorst, the first author’s mentor in coleopterology, and Hans Huijbregts, curator Coleoptera at Naturalis Biodiversity Center, took ample time to read an earlier version of this lengthy manuscript and provided useful comments and advice which helped to improve this catalogue. Michiel Boeken, Gert van Ee, Elisabeth Haber, Donna Ivie, Marijke Kanters, Mardik Leopold, Tyler Tran en Jaap Winkelman contributed their excellent photos. This study was co-funded by Naturalis Biodiversity Center, the European Invertebrate Survey, and the first author.

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  • Billberg, G.J. , 1820b. Novae insectorum species descriptae. – Mémoires de l’ Académie Impériale des Sciences de St-Pétersbourg 7: 381395.