Technology-Driven Revolutions in Military Affairs

Some Thoughts

In: Vulcan
View More View Less
  • 1 RTG Consultants, 43 Zahal Street, Kiryat-Ono, Israel, azriell@zahav.net.il

Purchase instant access (PDF download and unlimited online access):

€29.95$34.95

Abstract

The term Revolutions in Military Affair (rma) was originally coined by the Soviets realizing that the US planned to utilize electronics and computers to improve both its weapons and battle management. Other such revolutions were caused by the emergence of aircraft, submarines, mechanized warfare, precision-guided munitions (pgms), unmanned vehicles and Net-Centric-Warfare. Beside its effect on fighting, military technology also affects the public and its leadership. Several technological developments, such as rockets and drones, cyberwarfare, and homemade explosives and chemical and biological weapons, are already changing current concepts and conduct of warfare through their direct effect on warfighting and by their potential effect on the public and its leadership. Consequently, rmas should be analyzed in terms of the linkages between the rear, where chaos can be created, and the front, where the armed forces typically operate.

  • Adamsky, Dima. 2010. The Culture of Military Innovation. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

  • Anon. 1965. American Rifleman 113, no. 12 (Dec.): 2.

  • Bedford, Clay P. 1969. “The Forsyth Percussion System.” American Society of Arms Collectors Bulletin 19: 413.

  • Borkin, Joseph. 1978. The Crime and Punishment of I.G. Farben. New York: The Free Press.

  • Brown, Louis. 1999. A Radar History of World War II: Technical and Military Imperatives. Bristol, PA: Institute of Physics Publishing.

  • Bush, Vannevar. 1949. Modern Arms and Free Men. New York: Simon and Schuster.

  • Canby, Steven L. 1985. “The Operational Limits of Emerging Technology.” International Defense Review, 6: 875880.

  • Christensen, Charles, R. 2002. A History of the Development of Technical Intelligence in the Air Force, 1917–1947. Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Churchill, Winston. 1923. The World Crisis, 4 vols. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons.

  • Dupuy, Trevor N. and J. F. C. Fuller. 1945. Armament and History. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons.

  • Dupuy, Trevor, N. 1984. The Evolution of Weapons and Warfare. New York: Da Capo Press.

  • Eisenhower, Capt. D. D. 1920. “A Tank Discussion.” Infantry Journal 17, no. 5: 453458.

  • Everitt, Don. 1999. K Boats: Steam Powered Submarines in WWI. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press.

  • Finkel, Meir, 2011. On Flexibility. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

  • Guderian, Heinz. 1961. Panzer Leader. New York: Ballantine Books.

  • Handel, Michael, I. 1989. War, Strategy and Intelligence. London: Frank Cass.

  • Heilmeier, George, H. 1976. “Guarding Against Technological Surprise.” Air University Review 27, no. 6 (Sept.–Oct.): 27.

  • Hutcheon, Wallace. 1981. Robert Fulton. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press.

  • Johnson, David, E. 1998. Fast Tanks and Heavy Bombers. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

  • Johnson, Melvin M. and Haven, Charles T. 1945. Automatic Weapons of the World. New York: William Morrow.

  • Kelly, Orr. 1989. The Killing Zone. New York: W.W. Norton & Company.

  • Koch, H. W. 1982. Medieval Warfare. London: Bison Books.

  • Liddel Hart, B. H. 1932. Foch, the Man of Orleans. Boston: Little, Brown and Co.

  • Lorber, Azriel. 1985. “Active Defence against Precision Guided Munitions for the Future Battlefield.” Military Technology 9, no. 5: 7782.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Lorber, Azriel. 2002. Misguided Weapons – Technological Failure and Surprise on the Battlefield. Washington, DC: Brassey’s Inc.

  • MacIntyre, Donald and Basil Bathe. 1974. Man-of-War: A History of the Combat Vessel. New York: Castle Books.

  • Mahnken, Thomas G. 2002. Uncovering Ways of War: US Intelligence and Foreign Military Innovation, 1918–1941. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • McCarthy, Peter and Mike Syron. 2002. Panzerkrieg. New York: Carroll & Graph Publishers.

  • McKitrick, Jeffrey, and James Blackwell, James, et al. . 1998. “The Revolution in Military Affairs.” In Battlefield of the Future: 21st Century Warfare Issues, ed. by Schneider Barry and Grinter Lawrence, 6598. Maxwell Air Force Base, AL: Air University Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Metz, Steven and James Kievit. 1995. “Strategy and the Revolution in Military Affairs: From Theory to Policy.” Carlisle, PA: US Army Strategic Studies Institute.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Millett, Allan R. and Williamson Murray. 1988. Military Effectiveness. Vol. 1, The First World War. London: Unwin Hyman Ltd.

  • Mowthorpe, Matthew. 2005. “The Revolution in Military Affairs (RMA): The United States, Russian and Chinese Views.” The Journal of Social, Political, and Economic Studies 30: 137153.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Murray, Williamson and MacGregor Knox. 2001. “Thinking about Revolutions in Warfare.” In The Dynamics of Military Revolution 1300–2050, ed. by Murray and Knox, 114. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Price, Alfred. 1980. Aircraft versus Submarine: The Evolution of the Anti-Submarine Aircraft, 1912 to 1972. London: Jane’s.

  • Pritchard, David. 1989. The Radar War: Germany’s Pioneering Achievement, 1904–45. Wellingborough, Northants, UK: Patrick Stephens Limited.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • R.W.H. 1987. American Rifleman 135, no. 2 (Feb.): 42.

  • Richelson, Jeffrey T. 2002. The Wizards of Langley: Inside the CIA’s Directorate of Science and Technology. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Roberts, Michael. 1995. “The Military Revolution, 1560–1660.” In The Military Revolution Debate, ed. by Rogers Clifford J., 1336. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Rose, Alexander. 2008. American Rifle: A Biography. New York: Delacorte Press.

  • Rosen, Peter. 1991. Winning the Next War. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

  • Ross, G. Macleod and Sir Campbell Clarke. 1976. The Business of Tanks 1933 to 1945. Ilfracombe, UK: Arthur H. Stockwell Ltd.

  • Samuel, Wolfgang. 2004. American Raiders, the Race to Capture the Luftwaffe’s Secrets. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.

  • Seagrave, Sterling. 1981. Yellow Rain, A Journey through the Terror of Chemical Warfare. New York: M. Evans & Company, Inc.

  • Smith, W. H. B. 1973. Small Arms of the World. New York: Galahad Books.

  • Sternhell, Charles and Thorndike Alan. 1946. Antisubmarine Warfare in World War II, OEG Report No. 51. Washington, DC: Office of the Chief of Naval Operations.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Swinton, Ernest. 1932. Eyewitness, Being Personal Reminiscences of the Great War, Including the Genesis of the Tank. London: Hodder and Stoughton Ltd.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Thompson, Michael J. 2011. “Military Revolutions and Revolutions in Military Affairs: Accurate Descriptions of Change or Intellectual Constructs.” Strata 3: 82108.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [USCOGCFP] US Commission on the Organization of the Government for the Conduct of Foreign Policy. 1975. Commission on the Organization of the Government for the Conduct of Foreign Policy, vol. 4, Appendix K: Adequacy of Current Organization: Defense and Arms Control. Washington, DC: Gov. Printing Office.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Watts, Anthony. 1994. The Royal Navy, An Illustrated History. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press.

  • Watts, Barry. 2011. The Maturing Revolution in Military Affairs. Washington, DC: Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments.

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 155 155 34
Full Text Views 12 12 3
PDF Views & Downloads 24 24 5