Critical Latin America

Series Editors: David Carey Jr. and Renata Keller
Critical Latin America explores the historical and contemporary currents, connections, and conflicts of Latin Americans’ ideas and identities. The editors are particularly interested in the intersections of identities—gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class—and such public and private fora as politics, culture, art, religion, and family. Interdisciplinary in nature, the series also examines how forces such as migration, revolution, economic development, production of knowledge (particularly scientific and medical), social movements, education, and the environment shape the ideas, identities, and lived experiences of Latin Americans.

The editors invite proposals for original monographs, edited collections, translations, and critical primary source editions. Aiming to strike a balance between studies of the colonial and national eras, the series will consider manuscripts that deal with any period from the first European encounters in the Americas through the twenty-first century. The series embraces history on all scales, from the micro to the macro. The editors are as interested in relationships between people of African, Asian, European, and indigenous heritage in rural and urban communities as they are in the geopolitical relationships between nations and the transnational relationships of groups that defy borders.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Debbie de Wit.

The editors of Critical Latin America prefer that contributors adhere to the Chicago Manual of Style.

*A paperback edition of select titles in the series, for individual purchase only, will be released approximately 12 months after publication of the hardcover edition.

Series Editors
David Carey Jr., Loyola University Maryland
Renata Keller, University of Nevada, Reno

Editorial Board
Sergio Aguayo, El Colegio de México and Harvard University
Tanya Harmer, London School of Economics
Steve Palmer, University of Windsor
Bianca Premo, Florida International University
Matthew Restall, Penn State University
Julia Rodriguez, University of New Hampshire
John Soluri, Carnegie Mellon University