Emergence of Natural History

The Brill series Emergence of Natural History (ENH) features books that examine the historic attitude of humans towards nature as an object of study, and the development of the field of knowledge we now know as natural history. Observing, collecting and explaining the diversity of nature has been important throughout history. This series addresses the many faces of natural history from the classical age up to the early nineteenth century. It is particularly designed to include volumes on the lives, work and networks of people whose contributions have proven foundational, but who have been overshadowed by more well-known figures such as Linnaeus and Darwin. Volumes encompass the global and cultural history of natural history, explore the role played by practitioners such as traveling naturalists, collectors, artists, and bring attention to indigenous, visual, and manuscript sources.

Books may be scholarly monographs or edited works, but we also welcome well-researched exhibition catalogues or primary source editions with comprehensive introductions. Contributions that address underexplored figures, themes, and (visual) sources from an interdisciplinary and historical perspective are particularly encouraged.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Stefan Einarson or to one of the series editors Aaron M. Bauer (Villanova University, PA, USA), Kay Etheridge (Gettysburg College, PA, USA), Dominik Hünniger (University of Göttingen, DE), Andreas Weber, (University of Twente, NL). For information on how to submit a book proposal, please consult the Brill Author Guide.

Biographical Note

Aaron M. Bauer is the Gerald M. Lemole Endowed Professor of Integrative Biology at Villanova University in Pennsylvania. He received his doctoral degree in Zoology from the University of California, Berkeley in 1986, was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Calgary, and since 1988 has been based at Villanova. His biological research focuses on the systematics, morphology and biogeography of lizards of the Southern Hemisphere. His historical interests are centered on the development of European natural history cabinets and museums from the 16th to the 19th centuries, the history of the biological exploration of Africa, Asia and the Pacific, and the history of comparative anatomy, systematics, and herpetology.

Kay Etheridge is Professor of Biology at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania. She received her doctoral degree in Zoology from the University of Florida. Her current scholarship centers on the integration of natural history images. Earlier publications in physiology and ecology include studies on tropical bats, manatees, lizards, and salamanders. In addition to biology courses she teaches a seminar on creativity in art and science and a course on Renaissance Kunstkammer.

Dominik Hünniger is the managing director of the Lichtenberg-Kolleg, the Institute of Advanced Study at the University of Göttingen. He is a cultural historian of 18th century science, medicine and natural history collections. His current work examines the history of entomology in the long 18th century in the context of (colonial) exploration and the establishment of the research university across the Atlantic World. As an affiliate researcher at the Hunterian, University of Glasgow and a collaborator at the Office for Collection Development at Göttingen he is also interested in academic heritage and the material aspects of knowledge formation today and in the past.

Andreas Weber is an assistant professor in the department of Science, Technology and Policy Studies (STePS) at the University of Twente in the Netherlands. He received his doctoral degree from Leiden University in 2012. His research focusses on the history of natural history, chemistry, and governance in insular Southeast Asia and Europe in the long nineteenth century. Andreas is also working on a digital heritage project that develops a digital infrastructure for disclosing and networking illustrated handwritten biodiversity heritage collections.

Editorial Board

Series Editors
Aaron M. Bauer, Villanova University, PA, USA
Kay Etheridge, Gettysburg College, PA, USA
Dominik Hünniger, University of Göttingen
Andreas Weber, University of Twente, NL

Editorial Board
Tom Baione, AMNH, USA
Isabelle Charmantier, The Freshwater Biological Association, UK
Esther van Gelder, Teylers Museum, NL
Eric Jorink, Huygens ING, NL and Leiden University, NL
Sachiko Kusukawa, Cambridge University, UK
Santiago Madriñan, Universidad de Los Andes, COL
Dániel Margócsy, University of Cambridge,UK
Henrietta McBurney Ryan, independent scholar and art curator, UK
Staffan Müller-Wille, University of Exeter, UK and University of Lübeck, DE
Florence Pieters, University of Amsterdam, NL
Bert van de Roemer, University of Amsterdam, NL
Kees Rookmaaker, National University of Singapore, SG
Paul Smith, Leiden University, NL
Claudia Swan, Northwestern University, USA
Mary Terrall, UCLA Department of History, USA