Legal History Library

Legal History Library is a peer-reviewed book series on the history of law. The series includes the subseries Studies in the History of International Law and Studies in the History of Private Law. Both subseries have independent editorial teams.

Studies in the History of International Law publishes books on the history of international law in the broadest possible sense, without any restrictions in terms of geography or chronology. The series includes studies on the law governing relations between independent body politics, from whatever denomination or civilization. It does not reduce the field to the study of the antecedents, the emergence and evolution of international law as it was formed from the Late Middle Ages onwards in Western Europe. Studies in the History of International Law is edited by Randall Lesaffer. More information can be found on the series website.

Studies in the History of Private Law is a book series on the history of private law in the broadest sense. It focuses on the history of the two major families of private law in the world, European and Anglo-American private law. The history of civil procedure is expressly included in the series. There is no restriction in terms of chronology or geography as long as the particular object studied finds its origin in these two families. Studies in the History of Private Law is edited by Remco van Rhee, Dirk Heirbaut and Matthew C. Mirow. More information can be found on the series website.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the series editors or the publisher at BRILL, Wendel Scholma.

Brill Open offers you the choice to make your research freely accessible online in exchange for a Publication Charge. This can be by choice or to comply with funding mandates or university requirements. Brill offers various options of Open Access; for more information please go to the Brill Open webpage.

The series published an average of 2,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.

Review Quotes

The press about volume 1 in the series:
"[The book] succeeds as an excellent point of entry to what at times can seem like a highly complex subject. [..] [The editors] and their fellow contributors have undoubtedly got the new series off to the strongest possible start." – Warren Swain, The Edinburgh Law Review

Indexing and Abstracting

Scopus

Information