Mobilizing Memories

Memory is always moving ‒ between the individual and the collective, the local and the (trans)national, the past, the present, and the future. Remembering simultaneously creates and reveals connections across cultural, sociopolitical, and epistemological spheres. Such entanglements can be uneven or ambivalent in nature. Recent approaches frame and understand memory discourses as mobile, with the potential to mobilize individual and collective agency to serve diverging political ends. Memory studies, consolidated as a field of research over the past few decades, remains a vibrant intellectual and political project, particularly since broadening its conceptual and contextual horizons beyond the received paradigms of nation, region, and culture. Responding to this development, the editors of this series are particularly interested in projects that adopt a comparative approach, bringing postcolonial, migration, transregional, social movement, and performance studies into dialogue with memory studies. In this vein, we welcome scholarly work which explores memory in relation to postcoloniality, transculturality, and intersectionality, as well as projects that interrogate how memories can be a resource for the future which they inevitably shape.
Series editors
Hanna Teichler, Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
Rebekah Vince, Queen Mary University of London, UK

Editorial board
Aomar Boum, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
Paco Ferrandiz, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Spain
Ananya Kabir, King’s College London, UK
Jocelyn Martin, Ateneo de Manila University, Philippines
Vjeran Pavlakovic, University of Rijeka, Croatia
Alicia Salomone, University of Chile, Chile
Joanna Wawrzyniak, University of Warsaw, Poland
Students and researchers in the area of Memory studies, who would like to broadening their conceptual and contextual horizons beyond the received paradigms of nation, region, and culture. We adopt a comparative approach, bringing postcolonial, migration, transregional, and social movement studies into dialogue with memory studies.