State, Market, and Religions in Chinese Societies

Series:

This collection of original, new studies about Mainland China and Taiwan focuses on religious changes, and especially the role of the state and market in affecting religious developments in these societies. Information was gathered by participant observation and interviews primarily, and the analysis of documents secondarily. The topics covered are: the growing interest in the study of religion, the methods used by Christians to be able to coexist with a communist government, revival techniques being used by Buddhist monks, the strategies of Daoist priests and sect leaders to attract followers, the significance of mass-circulating morality books, and the ongoing debate about the significance and nature of Confucianism. The book will interest social scientists, religious specialists, journalists, and others who want to understand the changing nature of Chinese societies, and those interested in religious change in modernizing societies.

Paperback:

EUR €99.00USD $119.00

Biographical Note

Joseph B. Tamney is Professor Emeritus in the Sociology Department, Ball State University (USA). He received his B.S. and M.A. from Fordham University and his Ph.D. from Cornell University. He was a member of the editorial Board for the Encyclopedia of Religion and Society, editor of Sociology of Religion (1994-2000), and president of the Association for the Sociology of Religion (2003-4). His published works include: The Resilience of Christianity in the Modern World (State University of New York Press, 1992), American Society in the Buddhist Mirror (Garland 1992), The Struggle Over Singapore’s Soul: Western Modernization and Asian Culture (Walter de Gruyter 1996), The Resilience of Conservative Religion (Cambridge University Press 2002), and, with Linda Hsueh-Ling Chiang, Modernization, Globalization, and Confucianism in Chinese Societies (Praeger 2002). Fenggang Yang received his BA from the Hebei Normal University (Shijiazhuang, China), MA from Nankai University (Tianjin, China), and Ph.D. from The Catholic University of America (Washington, DC). He is an Assistant Pprofessor of Sociology at Purdue University. He is the author of Chinese Christians in America (Penn State University Press 1999) and the co-editor, along with Tony Carnes, of Asian American Religions: The Making and Remaking of Borders and Boundaries (New York University Press 2004). His articles have been published in various books and in the American Sociological Review, Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, Sociology of Religion, and Journal of Asian American Studies. His current research focuses on the political economy of religion in China, Christian ethics and market transition in China, and Chinese Christian churches in the United States.

Readership

All those social scientists, religious specialists, journalists, and others who want to understand the changing nature of Chinese societies, and those interested in religious change in modernizing societies

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