Subjects and Objects

Art, Essentialism, and Abstraction

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The subject matter of Subjects and Objects is the limits of Abstraction in art. The notion of Abstraction, its development in art history, and the relation of art and philosophy regarding Abstraction are considered in addition to identifying and examining things that are essential to artworks. Any artwork has an identity, and comprehension of that identity depends on a perceptual object. A subject’s apprehension of such an object creates an “artistic complex” of which the object, the subject, and the apprehension are constituents. The essential elements of this kind of complex are the subject of the final part of the work. Its concluding section considers these elements as ‘material’ to be used to determine the limits of Abstraction.
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Biographical Note

Jeffrey Strayer is a Continuing Lecturer in Philosophy at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne, U. S. A. Strayer is also an artist and is at work on a series of artworks in which the limits of Abstraction are determined.

Table of contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction

PART I. PRELIMINARY ISSUES RELEVANT TO ESSENTIALIST ABSTRACTION

PART II. ON SUBJECTS AND OBJECTS AND WORKS OF ART: GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS AND BASIC POINTS OF RELEVANCE TO ESSENTIALIST ABSTRACTION
Introduction
Division I. Singling Something Out, Artistic Identity, and Intentional Actions
Division II. Artists, Objects, and Some Minimum Conditions of Artistic Identity
Division III. Artistic Identity, Subjects, and Apprehensible Objects
Division IV. Artworks and Kinds of Object
Division V. Art and the Aesthetic

PART III. ON SUBJECTS AND OBJECTS AND ARTISTIC COMPLEXES: THE MATERIAL OF ESSENTIALISM
Introduction
Division I. The Notion of an Artistic Complex and Things of Relevance to It
Division II. Artistic Complexes and Subjects
Division III. Artistic Complexes and Objects
Division IV. Subjects and Objects and Artistic Complexes
Division V. The Essential Elements of Artistic Complexes

Part IV. Identity and Subjects, Objects, and Language: Concluding Remarks as a Preamble to an Essentialist Investigation of the Limits of Abstraction

Appendices
Appendix I. On the Notions of Object, Property, Haecceity, and Diversity.
Appendix II. Leibniz’s Law, the Laws of Identity and Difference, and the Identity of Indiscernibles
Appendix III. Distinction, Discrimination, and Distinguishability
Appendix IV. Impossible Objects

Works Mentioned in the Text and Selected Bibliography
Index

Readership

All those interested in Abstract art and its relation to consciousness and philosophical aesthetics, including philosophers of art, metaphysicians, members of the artworld, and those involved in consciousness studies.

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