God in Early Christian Thought

Essays in Memory of Lloyd G. Patterson

Series:

While the diversity of early Christian thought and practice is now generally assumed, and the experiences and beliefs of Christians beyond the works of great theologians increasingly valued, the question of God is perennial and fundamental. These essays, individually modest in scope, seek to address that largest of questions using particular issues and problems, or single thinkers and distinct texts. They include studies of doctrine and theology as traditionally conceived, but also of understandings of God among the early Christians that emerge from study of liturgy, art, and asceticism, and in relation to the social order and to nature itself.
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Biographical Note

Andrew McGowan (Ph.D, Notre Dame 1996) is Warden and President of Trinity College, the University of Melbourne. His work on the social and intellectual history of early Christianity includes Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999).
Brian E. Daley SJ (DPhil, Oxon. 1978) is Catherine F. Huisking Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame. A historical theologian, his books include The Hope of the Early Church (1991) and Gregory of Nazianzus (2006)
Timothy J. Gaden (Ph.D, Monash 1996) is Dean of the Theological School, College Chaplain and Stewart Lecturer in Theology at Trinity College, the University of Melbourne. His work on the Apostolic Fathers has been published in journals including Pacifica and Colloquium.

Table of contents

Contributors include Khaled Anatolios, Christopher Beeley, Katherina Bracht, Brian Daley, Robert Daly, James Ernest, Robert Grant, Annewies van den Hoek, Susan Holman, Robin Jensen, Andrew McGowan, Richard Norris, Ute Possekel, and Joseph Trigg,

Readership

Students of theology and of ancient religion, systematic theologians and Church historians, and all those with interests in the history of Christian doctrine, ancient society, art and philosophy.

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