Explaining Christian Origins and Early Judaism

Contributions from Cognitive and Social Science

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Cognitive science of religion is a radically new paradigm in the study of religion. Apart from psychology and anthropology of religion, also historians of religion have shown increasing interest in this approach. This volume is groundbreaking in combining cognitive analysis with historical and social-scientific approaches to biblical materials, Christian origins, and early Judaism. The book is in four parts: an introduction to cognitive and social-scientific approaches, applications of cognitive science, applications of conceptual blending theory, and applications of socio-cognitive analyses. The book will be of interest for historians of religion, biblical scholars, and those working in the cognitive science of religion.

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Petri Luomanen, Ph.D. (1996) in Theology, University of Helsinki, is an Academy Research Fellow at the University of Helsinki. He has published widely on the Gospel of Matthew, early Jewish Christianity and second-century Christianity, including A Companion to Second-Century Christian «Heretics» (Brill, 2005; co-edited with Antti Marjanen).
Ilkka Pyysiäinen, Ph.D. (1993) in Comparative Religion, University of Helsinki, is an Academy Research Fellow at the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies. He has published widely in the cognitive science of religion including How Religion Works (Brill, 2001).
Risto Uro, Ph.D. (1988) in Theology, University of Helsinki, is University Lecturer of New Testament Studies at the University of Helsinki. He has published widely on early Christianity and Gnosticism including Thomas: Seeking the Historical Context of the Gospel of Thomas (Continuum, 2003).
Contributors include: István Czachesz, Troels Engberg-Pedersen, Philip F. Esler, Raimo Hakola, Jutta Jokiranta, Kimmo Ketola, Hugo Lundhaug, Luther H. Martin, Vernon K. Robbins
All those interested in the history of early Christianity and Judaism, as well as other scholars of religion and of cognitive science.