Going Dutch

The Dutch Presence in America 1609-2009

Series:

This volume investigates the place of Dutch history and Dutch-derived culture in America over the last four centuries. It considers how the Dutch have fared in America, and it explores how American conceptions of Dutchness have developed, from Henry Hudson's historic voyage to Manhattan in 1609 through the rise of Dutch design at the turn of the twenty-first century. Essays probe a rich array of topics: Dutch themes in American arts and letters; the place of Dutch paintings in American collections; shifting American interests in Dutch art, literature, and architecture; the experience of Dutch immigrants in America; and the Dutch Reformed Church in America. Going Dutch presents a much needed overview of the Dutch-American experience from its beginnings to the present.

Contributors include: Julie Berger Hochstrasser, Willem Frijhoff, Joyce D. Goodfriend, Hans Krabbendam, Joseph Manca, Nancy T. Minty, Mark A. Peterson, Christopher Pierce, Judith Richardson, Louisa Wood Ruby, Benjamin Schmidt, Robert Schoone-Jongen, Annette Stott, Tity de Vries, and Dennis P. Weller.
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Biographical Note

Joyce D. Goodfriend, Ph.D. (1975) in History, UCLA, is Professor of History at the University of Denver. She is the author of Before the Melting Pot: Society and Culture in Colonial New York City, 1664-1730 and editor of Revisiting New Netherland: Perspectives on Early Dutch America.

Benjamin Schmidt, Ph.D. (1994), Harvard University, is Associate Professor of History at the University of Washington. His books include the prize-winning Innocence Abroad: The Dutch Imagination and the New World (2001) and Making Knowledge in Early Modern Europe: Practices, Objects, and Texts, 1400-1800 (2007).

Annette Stott, Ph.D., Boston University, is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Denver. She is the author of Holland Mania: the Unknown Dutch Period in American Art and Culture, 1880-1913, as well as numerous articles and essays about Dutch and American visual culture.

Review Quotes

"All essays are well-written, informative, and up to scholarly standards. (...) As the editors note at the end of the introduction, this volume is by no means the last word on the issue of Dutchness and Dutch-American studies. But it does break new ground in bringing heretofore seperate fields together and thus provides a platform for future research."
Jaap Jacobs, De Halve Maen 81:3 (2008) 63.

"(...) Going Dutch provides an informative new look at the place of the Dutch in American society as well as many leads and suggestions for further research."
Firth Haring Fabend, BMGN 124:3 (2009) 473-475.

Table of contents

List of Illustrations
List of Contributors
Acknowledgements

INTRODUCTION
Holland in America, Joyce D. Goodfriend, Benjamin Schmidt & Annette Stott

PART I. COLONIAL DUTCH INFLUENCES
1. Dutch Art and the Hudson Valley Patroon Painters, Louisa Wood Ruby
2. Erasing the Dutch: The Critical Reception of Hudson Valley Dutch Architecture, 1670–1840, Joseph Manca

PART II. NINETEENTH-CENTURY AMERICAN INTERPRETERS OF DUTCHNESS
3. The Ghosting of the Hudson Valley Dutch, Judith Richardson
4. A Brahmin Goes Dutch: John Lothrop Motley and the Lessons of Dutch History in Nineteenth-Century Boston, Mark A. Peterson

PART III. MIGRATION AND ASSIMILATION
5. “But tho we love old Holland still, we love Columbia more,” the Formation of a Dutch-American Subculture in the United States, 1840–1920, Hans Krabbendam
6. Churches Bigger Than Windmills: Religion and Dutchness in Minnesota, 1885–1928, Robert Schoone-Jongen
7. Windmills on the Plains: Vision and Social Memory in Two Dutch Communities in Iowa, Julie Berger Hochstrasser

PART IV. DUTCH ART AND AMERICAN COLLECTORS
8. Great Expectations: The Golden Age Redeems the Gilded Era, Nancy T. Minty
9. Old Masters in the New World: The Hudson-Fulton Exhibition of 1909 and its Legacy, Dennis P. Weller

PART V. DUTCH CULTURAL INFLUENCES IN MODERN AMERICA
10. Crossing the Frontiers of the Unknown: Fred. L. Polak’s Road to Pioneer of Futures Studies in the United States, Tity de Vries
11. From Bauhaus to Our House to Koolhaas: The Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) and Modern American Culture, Christopher Pierce

EPILOGUE
Dutchness in Fact and Fiction, Willem Frijhoff

Index

Readership

All those interested in American ethnic history and the history of immigration; specialists in Dutch-American history, art, architecture, and literature; descendants of Dutch immigrants; academic and public libraries, especially in New York, New Jersey, Michigan, and Iowa.

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