The Politics of Historical Production in Late Qing and Republican China

Series:

Editors: Tze-ki Hon and Robert Culp
This book examines forms of Chinese historical production happening outside the mainstream of academic history, through such new measures as the publication of textbooks, the writing of local history, the preservation of archival materials, and government attempts to establish orthodox historical accounts. The book does so in order to broaden the scope of modern Chinese historiography, when it focuses primarily on a small group of writers such as Liang Qichao, Gu Jiegang, and Fu Sinian.
Directly linking historical writings to the formation of the nation, the justification of elite authority, and the cultivation of active citizenry, this book shows that historiography is essential to understanding the uniqueness of Chinese modernity.

Also available in paperback.

E-Book: List price

EUR €135.00USD $168.00

Biographical Note

Tze-ki Hon, Ph.D. (1992) in History, University of Chicago, is Associate Professor of History at State University of New York-Geneseo. His research interests cover both pre-modern and modern China. His book, Yijing and the Chinese Politics (SUNY Press, 2005) examines the Yijing commentaries of the Northern Song period. He is an editor of a volume on the May-Fourth New Culture paradigm. Currently, he is completing a book on the Guocui xuebao (1905-1912).
Robert J. Culp, Ph.D. (1999) in History, Cornell University, is Assistant Professor of History and Asian Studies at Bard College. His first book is Articulating Citizenship: Civic Education and Student Politics in Southeastern China, 1912–1940 (Cambridge, MA, forthcoming 2007). His current work focuses on publishing and cultural production in early 20th-century China.

Review Quotes

"...this collection of essays is extremely helpful to researchers in the field. Its contributions are well documented and grant insights into source materials that, thus far, have stood outside the main focus of recent scholarship."
Dominic Sachsenmaier, Duke University, The Journal of Asian Studies, Vol. 68, No. 4 (Nov. 2009)

Table of contents

Preface
Fan-sen Wang
List of Contributors
Introduction
Tze-ki Hon and Robert J. Culp

PART ONE: THE NEW SCHOOL SYSTEM AND NEW EDUCATED ELITE
The New Schools and National Identity: Chinese History Textbooks in the Late Qing
Peter Zarrow
Classifying Peoples: Ethnic Politics in Late Qing Native-place Textbooks and Gazetteers
May-bo Ching
Educating the Citizens: Visions of China in Late Qing History Textbooks
Tze-ki Hon

PART TWO: GENERAL HISTORY AND WORLD HISTORY
Discontinuous Continuity: The Beginnings of a New Synthesis of “General History” in 20th-Century China
Mary G. Mazur
Zhang Yinlin’s Early China
Brian Moloughney
Contending Memories of the Nation: History Education in Wartime China, 1937-1945
Wai-keung Chan
“Weak and Small Peoples” in a “Europeanizing World”: World History Textbooks and Chinese Intellectuals’ Perspectives on Global Modernity
Robert J. Culp

PART THREE: NATIONAL HISTORY AND ITS CHALLENGES
Archives at the Margins: Luo Zhenyu’s Qing Documents and Nationalism in Republican China
Shana J. Brown
How to Remember the Qing Dynasty: The Case of Meng Sen
Madeleine Yue Dong
Liberalism and Nationalism at a Crossroads: The Guomindang’s Educational Policies, 1927-1930
Chiu-chun Lee

Index

Readership

All those interested in intellectual history, comparative historiography, the history of modern China, the history of nationalism, as well as the history of education.

Index Card

Collection Information