Religion, Ethnicity and Contested Nationhood in the Former Ottoman Space

Editor: Jørgen Nielsen
There has been a growing interest in recent years in reviewing the continued impact of the Ottoman empire even long after its demise at the end of the First World War. The wars in former Yugoslavia, following hot on the civil war in Lebanon, were reminders that the settlements of 1918-22 were not final. While many of the successor states to the Ottoman empire, in east and west, had been built on forms of nationalist ideology and rhetoric opposed to the empire, a newer trend among historians has been to look at these histories as Ottoman provincial history. The present volume is an attempt to bring some of those histories from across the former Ottoman space together. They cover from parts of former Yugoslavia, Bulgaria and Greece to Lebanon, including Turkey itself, providing rich material for comparing regions which normally are not compared.
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Biographical Note

Jørgen S. Nielsen, Ph.D. (1978) in Arab history, American University of Beirut, is Professor of Islamic Studies at the University of Copenhagen. He has worked extensively on Muslims in Europe and is the chief editor of Yearbook of Muslims in Europe (Brill, 2009 and later).

Review Quotes

'...Above all else, this erudite book is articulate in substance and a real joy to read. One certainly hopes it will appeal to the wide readership it deserves. The structure and choice of contributors serve the editor’s purpose to undermine the traditional Cowboys-and-Indians historiography
that has dominated studies of the Devlet-i Âliyye-i Osmâniyye since its ascent many centuries ago, and the true complexity and multi-layered nature of Ottoman society is laid bare, with succinct clarity'.
Abdullah Drury, University of Waikato, New Zealand
In: Islam and Christian–Muslim Relations 24.4 (2013).

Readership

Those interested in late Ottoman history and the historiography of Ottoman successor nations, nationalism and ethnic and religious relations.

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