Afghanistan, Iraq, and Post-Conflict Governance: Damoclean Democracy?

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Much has been written about democratizing Afghanistan and Iraq, yet a clear-cut, theoretically-enriching, and empirically thick comparative analysis remains overdue for societies as divided as these two. To partly fill in the vacuum, this book utilizes various theories and stages of international negotiations(which catalyzed democratization in both cases) in interpreting both cases, while also distinguishing between endogenous and exogenous democratization forces. How electoral democracy came about in both cases is traced from the negotiating table through at least 4 stages and 6 chapters. The study finds democratization being more stable when left on its own momentum (as in Afghanistan) than when conflict-driven (as in Iraq). Though full-fledged democracy does not appear inevitable in either case, the study's insightful exploration of its interface in Islamic communities and as a Bush Doctrine component alerts us to fasten our seat belts before elections beckon again.
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Biographical Note

Imtiaz Hussain is Professor of International Relations in Mexico City’s Universidad Iberoamericana, with recent publications addressing regional integration, democratization, and homeland security. A recipient of several teaching and research awards, he received his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, and is from Bangladesh.

Table of contents

List of Illustrations
List of Abbreviations
Acknowledgements

1. Afghanistan & Iraq, Democracy & the United States: Between Rocks and Hard Places
Introduction: Of Puzzles, Problems, & Predicaments
Nature of the Subject
Formatting Interpretations
Signifi cance of Subject
Organization

2. Hyphenating Democracy: Germany, Japan, & the Confl ict Thesis
Argument
Theoretical Perspective
Democratizing the Defeated: German and Japanese
Experiences in Comparative Light
Conclusions

3. Embracing Democracy: Afghanistan, Iraq, & Prior U.S.
Considerations
Introduction
Negotiating Democracy
Conclusions

4. Blindfolding Democracy: Blueprinting Ballots From
Bullets
Introduction
Building a Blueprint
Actors and Actions
From Confl ict to Cooperation
Conclusions

5. Sine qua non democracy: Afghan-Iraq Symmetries &
C.P.A. as Oddball
Introduction
A Tale of Two Negotiating Tables
Conclusions

6. Ad Hoc Democracy: Troubled Waters Too Deep,
Bridges Too Few
Introduction
Afghanistan-Iraq Comparisons & Contrasts
Conclusions

7. Constitutional Democracy: Afghanistan’s Paper Tiger &
Iraq’s Pigeon Clay
Introduction
Profi ling Constitution-making
Future Prospects: Towards Functional Statehood
Conclusions

8. Electoral Democracy: Still the Road Less Traveled By
Introduction
Elections and Governmental Performances
Post-Election Issues and Contentions
Contexts and Verdicts
Conclusions

9. Conclusions: Damoclean Democracy?
A Triple-headed Monstrosity & Mine-fi lled Exits
Negotiations-Democratization Approach
Substantive Similarities and Differences
Theoretical Reprise

Bibliography
Index

Readership

The volume is most pertinent for scholars of democracy, Middle East & Persian Gulf specialists, graduate students focusing on democracy/Middle East/Persian Gulf, policy-makers, and the informed public.

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