New Approaches to the Study of Biblical Interpretation in Judaism of the Second Temple Period and in Early Christianity

Proceedings of the Eleventh International Symposium of the Orion Center for the Study of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Associated Literature, Jointly Sponsored by the Hebrew University Center for the Study of Christianity, 9–11 January, 2007

Series:

2007 marked the 60th anniversary of the discovery of the first Dead Sea Scrolls. The 11th International Orion Symposium (January, 2007), “New Approaches to the Study of Biblical Interpretation in the Second Temple Period and in Early Christianity,” provided a measure of the ways in which the discovery of the scrolls has altered the paradigms for textual and historical studies in the intervening six decades. The papers in this volume address such issues as the connections and distinctions between Jewish interpretation within the Land of Israel and outside of it; between Jewish and Christian exegesis in earlier and later periods; between biblical interpretation in literature and in art; between interpretation and the formation of the biblical canon.

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Biographical Note
Gary A. Anderson, Ph.D. (1985), Harvard University, is Hesburgh Professor of Catholic Theology at the University of Notre Dame. Recent books include: Genesis of Perfection: Adam and Eve in Jewish and Christian Imagination (2001), and Sin: A History (2009).

Ruth A. Clements, Th.D (1997), Harvard University Divinity School, is Head of Publications at the Orion Center for the Study of the Dead Sea Scrolls, and co-editor of Text, Thought, and Practice in Qumran and Early Christianity (2009).

David Satran, Ph.D. (1986), The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Comparative Religion, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He has published on Philo, philosophical religion, and Jewish and Christian biblical interpretation.
Table of contents
Some Considerations on the Categories “Bible” and “Apocrypha”
MICHAEL E. STONE

I. Interpretation in Context

“For from Zion Shall Come Forth Torah . . .” (Isaiah 2:3): Biblical Paraphrase and the Exegetical Background of Susanna
MICHAEL SEGAL

Different Traditions or Emphases? The Image of God in Philo’s De Opificio Mundi
GREGORY E. STERLING

The Implied Audience of the Letter of James
MAREN NIEHOFF

James on Faith and Righteousness in the Context of a Broader Jewish Exegetical Discourse
SERGE RUZER

II. Comparative Studies

You Will Have Treasure in Heaven
GARY A. ANDERSON

Allegorical Interpretation of Biblical Narratives in Rabbinic Literature, Philo, and Origen: Some Case Studies
MENAHEM KISTER

Hermeneutics of Holiness: Syriac-Christian and Rabbinic Constructs of Holy Community and Sexuality
NAOMI KOLTUN-FROMM

The Parallel Lives of Early Jewish and Christian Texts and Art: The Case of Isaac the Martyr
RUTH A. CLEMENTS

III. InterpretiveTrajectories

Didymus the Blind and the Philistores: A Contest over Historia in Early Christian Exegetical Argument
RICHARD LAYTON

Exegeting the Eschaton: Dionysius the Areopagite and the Apocalypse
SERGIO LA PORTA

Readership
All those interested in early Judaism and rabbinics, early Christianity and patristics, and the history of biblical interpretation.
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