The Responsibility to Protect and International Law

The Responsibility to Protect (R2P) is a major new international principle, adopted unanimously in 2005 by Heads of State and Government. Whilst it is broadly acknowledged that the principle has an important and intimate relationship with international law, especially the law relating to sovereignty, peace and security, human rights and armed conflict, there has yet to be a volume dedicated to this question. The Responsibility to Protect and International Law fills that gap by bringing together leading scholars from North America, Europe and Australia to examine R2P’s legal content.

The Responsibility to Protect and International Law focuses on questions relating to R2P’s legal quality, its relationship with sovereignty, and the question of whether the norm establishes legal obligations. It also aims to introduce readers to different legal perspectives, including feminism, and pressing practical questions such as how the law might be used to prevent genocide and mass atrocities, and punish the perpetrators.



Paperback:

EUR €72.00USD $90.00

Biographical Note

Alex J. Bellamy is Professor of International Security at the Griffith Asia Institute/Centre for Governance and Public Policy, Griffith University, Australia. His recent books include, 'Responsibility to Protect: The Global Effort to End Mass Atrocities' and he is currently completing 'Massacres and Morality: Mass Killing in an Age of Civilian Immunity.' Sara E. Davies is an Australian Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow at the Griffith Asia Institute and Centre for Governance and Public Policy, Griffith University. Dr Davies is author of ‘Legitimising Rejection: International Refugee Law in Southeast Asia’ and ‘The Global Politics of Health.’ Luke Glanville has recently received his PhD in International Relations from University of Queensland. He is a Research Fellow at the Griffith Asia Institute and Centre for Governance and Public Policy, Griffith University, Australia.

Table of contents

Introduction. Alex J. Bellamy, Sara E. Davies and Luke Glanville Sovereignty, Choice and the Responsibility to Protect, Edward C. Luck A Bird in the Hand is Worth Two in the Bush – On the Assumed Legal Nature of the Responsibility to Protect, Ekkehard Strauss The Responsibility to Protect and the Use of Force: Building Legality? Jutta Brunnée and Stephen J. Toope The Responsibility to Protect and International Law, Alex J. Bellamy and Ruben Reike The Responsibility to Protect: A Legal and Rights-based Perspective, Dorota Gierycz International Law and the Responsibility to Protect: Clarifying or Expanding States’ Responsibilities? Jennifer M. Welsh and Maria Banda Feminist Reflections on the Responsibility to Protect, Hilary Charlesworth Responsibility to Protect: A Framework for Prevention, Sheri P. Rosenberg Stopping the Killing: The International Criminal Court and Juridical Determination of the Responsibility to Protect, Michael Contarino and Selena Lucent Conclusion, Alex J. Bellamy, Sara E. Davies and Luke Glanville

Information