The Teachings of Syrianus on Plato's Timaeus and Parmenides

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Although it has long been established that Syrianus, the teacher of Proclus, was the source of much of his student's metaphysics, it is not known precisely what in Proclus' thought can be attributed to Syrianus. The problem is compounded by the fact that Syrianus wrote very little and there is uncertainty as to whether written commentaries ever existed of his teaching on Plato's Timaeus and Parmenides, the most important sources for Platonic metaphysics. This work attempts to re-construct the major tenets of Syrianus' philosophical teachings on the Timaeus and Parmenides based on the testimonia of Proclus, as found in Proclus' commentaries on Plato's Timaeus and Parmenides and, Damascius, as reported in his On First Principles and commentary on Plato's Parmenides.
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Biographical Note

Sarah Klitenic Wear, Ph.D. (2005) in Classics, Trinity College, Dublin, is Associate Professor of Classics at The Franciscan University of Steubenville. She has published on Syrianus and other Platonists, including Despoiling the Hellenes: Pseudo-Dionysius and the Athenian School of Platonism, with John M. Dillon (Ashgate, 2007).

Table of contents

Table of Contents For The Teachings of Syrianus on Plato’s Timaeus and Parmenides
Sarah Klitenic Wear

Abbreviations of Manuscripts 4-7

Introduction 8-43

Life and Works 8-11

Philosophical Position 11-29

A Note on Syrianus’ Exegesis of Parmenides 29-31

Problems of Methodology 31-38

Review of Scholarship 39-42

Notes on the Present Edition 42-43

Fragments

In Tim. Fr. 1 44-45

In Tim. Fr. 2 56-64

In Tim. Fr. 3 65-73

In Tim. Fr. 4 74-78

In Tim. Fr. 5 79-83

In Tim. Fr. 6 84-91

In Tim. Fr. 7 92-97

In Tim. Fr. 8 98-108

In Tim. Fr. 9 109-115

In Tim. Fr. 10 116-121

In Tim. Fr. 11 122-126

In Tim. Fr. 12 127-131

In Tim. Fr. 13 132-137

In Tim. Fr. 14 138-145

In Tim. Fr. 15 146-149

In Tim. Fr. 16 150-159

In Tim. Fr. 17 160-165

In Tim. Fr. 18 166-171

In Tim. Fr. 19 172-177

In Tim. Fr. 20 178-183

In Tim. Fr. 21 184-190

In Tim. Fr. 22 191-196

In Tim. Fr. 23 197-202

In Tim. Fr. 24 203-210

In Tim. Fr. 25 211-215


In Parm. Fr. 1 216-222

In Parm. Fr. 2 223-228

In Parm. Fr. 3 229-240

In Parm. Fr. 4 241-249

In Parm. Fr. 5 250-270

In Parm. Fr. 6 271-277

In Parm. Fr. 7 278-284

In Parm. Fr. 8 285-294

In Parm. Fr. 9 295-300

In Parm. Fr. 10 301-310

In Parm. Fr. 11 311-314
In Parm. Fr. 12 315-317

In Parm. Fr. 13 318-321

In Parm. Fr. 14 322-324

In Parm. Fr. 14a 325-326

In Parm. Fr. 15 327-328

Abbreviations of Works Frequently Cited 329-330

Bibliography 331-343

Text Critical Apparatus (end notes) 343-345

Readership

All those interested in Platonism and ancient philosophy

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