The Russian Jewish Diaspora and European Culture, 1917-1937

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The Jewish emigration from Russia after the Revolution of 1917 changed the face of Jewish culture in Western Europe. Russian Jews brought with them the visions of a national Jewish literature in Hebrew, Yiddish or Russian, and new concepts of secular Jewish music and art. Often they acted as intermediaries between Jewish centres in Europe, which resulted in the creation of a single sphere of Jewish culture common to all parts of the European diaspora. Although some stayed in Western Europe for only a few years before moving on to Palestine, the budding Hebrew culture in Palestine would not have been the same without this relatively short period of intense contact between Russian Jewish and Western European cultures.

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Biographical Note

Jörg Schulte, Ph.D. (2003), is a Honarary research associate at the Department of Hebrew and Jewish Studies at UCL. He has been a fellow at The Warburg Institute in London and has been teaching at the universities of Hamburg and Warsaw. His publications include Eine Poetik der Offenbarung: Isaak Babel’ – Bruno Schulz – Danilo Kiš (Harrassowitz, 2004) and Jan Kochanowski und die europäische Renaissance (Harrassowitz, 2012).

Olga Tabachnikova, Ph.D. (2007), University of Bath, has been working at the universities of Bath and Bristol. She has published widely in the field of European philosophical and literary studies, with the main focus on Russian cultural history. Her recent publications include Anton Chekhov through the eyes of Russian thinkers (editor, Anthem, 2010) and Unpublished Correspondence between Lev Shestov and Boris de Schloezer (YMCA, 2011).

Peter J. Wagstaff, Ph.D. (1981), University of Exeter, teaches French and European Studies at the University of Bath. He has published extensively on French and other European narratives of migration and exile, including Cultures of Exile (Berghahn, 2004) and Border Crossings (Lang, 2004).

Table of contents

Introduction
François Guesnet
PART ONE: RUSSIAN JEWISH TRANSLATORS AND WRITERS
Schiller’s Wilhelm Tell in Bialik’s Translation (1923)
Anat Feinberg
Bialik’s Translation of Don Quixote (1912/1923)
Marianna Prigozhina
Vogel and the City
Glenda Abramson
Marginalia of the Hebrew Revival: The Enrichment of Literary Hebrew through Calques of Russian Phrases and Literary Images (Elisheva and Leah Goldberg) [translated by Jörg Schulte]
Zoya Kopelman
PART TWO: INTERPRETATIONS OF PAST AND PRESENT OF JEWISH CULTURE
Russian-Jewish Ideas in German Dress: Elias Bickerman on the Hellenizing Reformers of Jewish Antiquity
Albert Baumgarten
Nahum Slouschz (1871-1966) and his Contribution to the Hebrew Renaissance
Jörg Schulte
Cultural Anxieties of Russian-Jewish Émigrés: Max Eitingon and Lev Shestov
Olga Tabachnikova
Pinḥas Rutenberg and Vladimir Burtsev: Some Unknown Aspects of the Connection between Palestine and the Russian Emigration in Europe
Vladimir Khazan
An Enclave in Time? Russian-Jewish Berlin Revisited
Olaf Terpitz
Bergelson, Benjamin, and Berlin: Justice Deferred
Harriet Murav
PART THREE: NEW SOURCES ON RUSSIAN JEWISH INFLUENCES IN MUSIC, ART AND PUBLISHING
If Moscow were Paris… Russia, the Soviet Union and Birobidzhan as Points of Reference in the Yiddish Press of Paris
Agnieszka W. Wierzcholska
Der Einfluss der jüdischen kulturellen Renaissance in Osteuropa auf das Musikleben in Wien (1919–1938)
Jascha Nemtsov
The Graphic Work of Issachar Ber Ryback (1897-1935): an Outstanding Example of Children’s Book Art
Serge-Aljosja Stommels and Albert Lemmens
’A Beautiful Lie’ - Zhar Ptitsa (The Firebird): Sustaining Jour¬nalistic Activity and Showcasing Russia in 1920s Berlin
Susanne Marten-Finnis
The Absence of a Jewish Russian Legacy in France: Ben-Ami’s Testimony and the Schwartzbard Affair
Boris Czerny
Ideology and Identity: El Lissitzky in Berlin
Christina Lodder
PART FOUR: REPOSITORIES OF THE RUSSIAN JEWISH DIASPORA
Simon Dubnow and the Question of Jewish Emigration in the Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Century
Viktor Kel’ner
‘Immortalizing the Crime in History…’: The Activities of the ‘Ostjüdisches Historisches Archiv’ (Kiev—Berlin—Paris, 1920-1940)
Efim Melamed
From a Russian-Jewish Philanthropic Organization to the ‘Glorious Institute of World Jewry’: Activities of the World ORT Union in the 1920s – 1940s
Alexander Ivanov
Vladimir (Zeev) Jabotinsky and His Recently Discovered Works: Problems of Attribution and Analysis
Leonid Katsis

Readership

All those interested in the cultural history of Russian Jewry abroad, as well as European intellectual history and history of ideas of the first half of the 20th century.

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