Conservation of Caribbean Island Herpetofaunas Volume 2: Regional Accounts of the West Indies

Most of the islands of the Caribbean have long histories of herpetological exploration and discovery, and even longer histories of human-mediated environmental degradation. Collectively, they constitute a major biodiversity hotspot – a region rich in endemic species that are threatened with extinction. This two-volume series documents the existing status of herpetofaunas (including sea turtles) of the Caribbean, and highlights conservation needs and efforts. Previous contributions to West Indian herpetology have focused on taxonomy, ecology and evolution, particularly of lizards. This series provides a unique and timely review of the status and conservation of all groups of amphibians and reptiles in the region. This volume provides regional accounts of the islands of the West Indies biogeographic region: Anguilla; Antigua and Barbuda; The Bahamas; Barbados; The British Virgin Islands; The Cayman Islands; The Commonwealth of Dominica; The Dominican Republic; The Dutch Windward Islands of St. Eustatius, Saba and St. Maarten; The French West Indies; Grenada; The Grenadines; Jamaica; Martinique; Puerto Rico; St. Vincent; The Turks and Caicos Islands; The United States Virgin Islands. Each account discusses the conservation problems of the herpetofauna and their solutions, in a region made up of islands of diverse ecology and political systems. The book will be useful to biologists and conservationists working in or visiting the Caribbean, and internationally as a summary of the current situation in the region.

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Table of contents

Preface
Conserving the herpetofauna of Anguilla
Karim V.D. Hodge, Robert Powell and Ellen J. Censky
An introduction to the herpetofauna of Antigua, Barbuda and Redonda, with some conservation
recommendations
Jennifer C. Daltry
Conservation of amphibians and reptiles in The Bahamas
Charles R. Knapp, John B. Iverson, Sandra D. Buckner and Shelley V. Cant
The herpetofauna of Barbados: Anthropogenic impacts and conservation status
Angela Fields and Julia A. Horrocks
Conservation of amphibians and reptiles in the British Virgin Islands: Status and patterns
G. Perry and G.P. Gerber
The amphibians and reptiles of the Cayman Islands: Conservation issues in the face of invasions
A.C. Echternacht, F.J. Burton and J.M. Blumenthal
A report on the status of the herpetofauna of the Commonwealth of Dominica,West Indies
Anita Malhotra, Roger S. Thorpe, Eric Hypolite and Arlington James
Conservation of the herpetofauna of the Dominican Republic
Robert Powell and Sixto J. Incháustegui
Conservation of the herpetofauna on the DutchWindward Islands: St. Eustatius, Saba, and St.
Maarten
Robert Powell
Amphibians and reptiles of the FrenchWest Indies: Inventory, threats and conservation
Olivier Lorvelec, Michel Pascal, Claudie Pavis and Philippe Feldmann
The herpetofauna of Grenada and the Grenada Grenadines: Conservation concerns
Robert W. Henderson and Craig S. Berg
An annotated checklist of the amphibians and terrestrial reptiles of the Grenadines with notes on
their local natural history and conservation
Jacques Daudin and Mark de Silva
Conservation of Jamaican amphibians and reptiles
Byron S. Wilson
The terrestrial herpetofauna of Martinique: Past, present, future
Michel Breuil
Conserving the Puerto Rican herpetofauna
Rafael L. Joglar, Alberto O. Álvarez, T. Mitchell Aide, Diane Barber, Patricia A. Burrowes, Miguel A.
García, Abimael León-Cardona, Ana V. Longo, Néstor Pérez-Buitrago, Alberto Puente, Neftalí
Rios-López and Peter J. Tolson
The St. Vincent (Lesser Antilles) herpetofauna: Conservation concerns
Robert Powell and Robert W. Henderson
Status, conservation, and introduction of amphibians and reptiles in the Turks and Caicos Islands,
BritishWest Indies
R. Graham Reynolds
Conservation status of reptiles and amphibians in the U.S. Virgin Islands
Renata J. Platenberg and Ralf H. Boulon, Jr.
Index of genera and species

Readership

Researchers working in or visiting the West Indies, and all those interested in the Caribbean as a biodiversity hotspot from a regional or international perspective.

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