Dependent Archipelagos in the Law of the Sea

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Dependent Archipelagos in the Law of the Sea examines the archipelagic concept in international law of the sea with respect to dependent archipelagos, both coastal and outlying. The monograph offers a thorough examination of the regime of straight baselines, and the implications arising from their application to archipelagos. It further analyses the practice of States with regard to the delimitation of the maritime zones of archipelagos, and assesses its value both as an element contributing to the interpretation of the Law of the Sea Convention - especially related to the application of article 7 - and as a factor leading to new developments in international law with an emphasis on customary law.

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Biographical Note

Sophia Kopela, LLB (Athens), LLM (Nottingham), PhD (Bristol) is Lecturer in law at Lancaster University Law School, United Kingdom.

Table of contents

Preface and Acknowledgments
List of abbreviations
List of Figures

1. Introduction
1.1 Archipelagos, the archipelagic concept and the law of the Sea Convention
1.2 Dependent coastal and outlying archipelagos: definitional aspects
1.3 The scope and structure of the book

2. The development of the archipelagic concept in international law of the sea: from straight baselines to the archipelagic regime of the Law of the Sea Convention
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Proposals and evolution of the archipelagic concept prior to the Third Conference on the Law of the Sea
2.3 Archipelagos and the Third Conference on the Law of the Sea
2.4 Concluding remarks: the application of the archipelagic concept in the LOSC: gains and losses

3. The application of straight baselines on the basis of article 7 LOSC and state practice: implications for coastal archipelagos
3.1 Introduction
3.2 Article 7 LOSC and application of straight baselines in localities where there is a ‘fringe of islands along the coast in its immediate vicinity
3.3 The provision, the most (mis)used? Reflections on state practice with an emphasis on coastal archipelagos
3.4 The contemporary relevance of straight baselines in coasts fringed with islands
3.5 Concluding remarks: reconsideration of the rationale of article 7 and coastal archipelagos

4. Dependent outlying archipelagos: straight baselines, the LOSC and state practice
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Potential application of straight baselines on the basis of the Law of the Sea Convention on dependent outlying archipelagos
4.3 Practice of states in outlying archipelagos
4.4 Concluding Remarks

5. Law-creating value of the practice of states in outlying archipelagos with an emphasis on customary international law
5.1 Introduction
5.2 The development of customary international law related to outlying archipelagos and the LOSC
5.3 The status of general customary international law with regard to dependent outlying archipelagos
5.4 Conclusion

6. The archipelagic concept and special customary and historic rights: three case studies
6.1 Introduction
6.2 Some introductory remarks on special customary / historic rights
6.3 Conclusion

7. Legitimacy of the archipelagic regime and future developments
7.1 Introduction
7.2 Contemporary relevance of the archipelagic regime: Part IV of the LOSC and dependent outlying archipelagos
7.3 Application of the archipelagic regime to archipelagic dependencies: potential and implications
7.4 Conclusion

8. Conclusion
8.1 The manifestation of the archipelagic concept in international law of the sea
8.2 Straight and archipelagic baselines, accommodation of conflicting interests and the legitimacy of the archipelagic concept

Appendix
Bibliography
Index

Readership

Academics, researchers and students with an interest in international law of the sea, as well as state officials and practitioners dealing with issues related to the delimitation of maritime zones.

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