The Transformation of Vernacular Expression in Early Modern Arts

Series:

In response to the dominance of Latin as the language of intellectual debate in early modern Europe, regional centers started to develop a new emphasis on vernacular languages and forms of cultural expression. This book shows that the local acts as a mark of distinction in the early modern cultural context. Interdisciplinary in scope, essays examine vernacular strands in the visual arts, architecture and literature from the fourteenth to seventeenth centuries. Contributions focus on change, rather than consistencies, by highlighting the transformative force of the vernacular over time and over different regions, as well as the way the concept of the vernacular itself shifts depending on the historical context.

Contributors include James J. Bloom, Jessica E. Buskirk, C. Jean Campbell, Lex Hermans, Sun Jing, Trudy Ko, David A. Levine, Eelco Nagelsmit, Alexandra Onuf, Bart Ramakers, and Jamie L. Smith
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Biographical Note

Joost Keizer, Ph.D. (2008) in Art History, Universiteit Leiden, is Assistant Professor of Art History at Yale University. Before going to Yale, he was Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow and Lecturer at Columbia University, 2008-2010. His research focuses on Italian Renaissance Art, from 1300 to 1550. He recently completed his first book, Michelangelo and the Politics of History (forthcoming).

Todd M. Richardson, Ph.D. (2007) in Art History, Universiteit Leiden, is Assistant Professor of Art History at the University of Memphis. He is the author of Pieter Bruegel the Elder: Art Discourse in the Sixteenth-Century Netherlands (2011) and co-editor of Image and Imagination of the Religious Self in Late Medievel and Early Modern Europe (2008).

Review Quotes

‘’This book will be of use to scholars and students with an interest in the Northern Renaissance but also in the history and art history of early modern Europe. Although the essays cover a wide and very disparate area, this volume further encourages scholars to consider what interdisciplinary studies can encompass and how images can be studied alongside texts.’’
Rachel Goldman, Adelphi University. In: Renaissance Quaterly, Vol. 65, No. 3 (Fall 2012), pp. 896.

‘’This high quality anthology stimulates fresh thought about relations both within across art forms, particularly as cultural practices. Both editors deserve high praise for assembling these essays and for their own analysis. Despite its diversity of topics, the volume successfully coheres, opening up issues relevant to all humanist readers of this journal in its provocative ensemble’’.
Larry Silver, University of Pennsylvania. In: Sixteenth Century Journal, Vol. 43, No. 4, 2012, p. 1163.

‘’This is a rich collection in terms not only of the approaches taken and the questions asked, but also the variety of artistic forms and cultural expressions examined, from literature and the visual and plastic arts, to vernacular poetry, landscapes, music, and even oral culture. Overall, it contains tightly argued papers and a number of significant and original insights’’.
Marcus K. Harmes, The University of Southern Queensland. In: Parergon, 30.2 (2013), p. 209.

Table of contents

Introduction: The Place of the Vernacular in Early Modern Culture
JOOST KEIZER and TODD M. RICHARDSON


I. INTERSECTIONS

Petrarch’s Italy, Sovereign Poetry and the Hand of Simone Martini
C. JEAN CAMPBELL

‘Salve Maria Gods Moeder Ghepresen.’ The Salve Regina and the Vernacular in the Art of Hans Memling, Anthonis de Roovere, and Jacab Obrecht
JESSEICA E. BUSKIRK

Going Local: Three Sixteenth-Century Florentine Views on Donatello’s St. George
LEX HERMANS

As Many Lands, As Many Customs: Vernacular Self-Awareness Among the Netherlandish Rhetoricians
BART RAMAKERS

Frans Hals and the Vernacular
DAVID A. LEVINE

II. METHOD

The Hybrid Text: Transformation of the Vernacular in Beware the Cat
TRUDY KO

Local Terrains: Imaging the Vernacular Landscape in Sixteenth-Century Antwerp
ALEXANDRA ONUF

III. IDENTITIES

Als ich can: How Jan van Eyck Extended the Vernacular from Dutch Poetry to Oil Painting
JAMIE L. SMITH


Pictorial Babel: Inventing the Flemish Visual Vernacular
JAMES J. BLOOM

Visualizing Vitruvius: Stylistic Pluralism in Serlio’s Sixth Book on Architecture?
EELCO NAGELSMIT

Exotic Imitation and Local Cultivation: A Study on the Art Form of Dutch Delftware Between 1640 and 1720
JING SUN


BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX NOMINUM

Readership

All those interested in the history early modern art, architecture and literature, the vernacular, as well as historians of English, Flemish, Dutch, and Italian language and culture.

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