'A plaine and easie waie to remedie a horse'

Equine medicine in early modern England

Series:

'A plaine and easie waie to remedie a horse' is the first complete text to focus exclusively on the health and illness of the most important animals in early modern England. It also follows on and further develops the subject of early modern veterinary medicine introduced by Louise Hill Curth in 'The Care of Brute Beasts: a social and cultural study of veterinary medicine in early modern England'.
This book is divided into three sections which start by providing an overview of the evolution of English hippiatric medicine from ancient and medieval times into the early modern period. The second section moves on to the structures of practice which include the astrological principles between preventative, remedial and surgical medicine for horses, followed by an in-depth discussion of how such knowledge was disseminated through the oral, manuscript and print culture.
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Biographical Note

Louise Hill Curth Ph.D. is Reader in Medical History at the University of Winchester, G.B. She has published extensively on the history of both veterinary and human medicine with her most recent monograph being The Care of Brute Beasts: a social and cultural study of veterinary medicine in early modern England (Brill, 2010).

Readership

Academics, undergraduate and postgraduate students in a range of interdisciplinary subjects such as veterinary, medical, social or cultural history; animal studies; literature; sociology; anthropology; philosophy; zoology; veterinary or human medicine.

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