Capital Accumulation and Migration

Series:

Dennis C. Canterbury’s Capital Accumulation and Migration explores the subject of capital accumulation and migration, a topic that is remarkably absent in the voluminous literature spawned under neoliberal capitalism by the renewed interest in the development impact of migration. This volume undertakes a critique of this literature and adds a critical dimension to it, while analyzing the financialization of migration processes. A central feature of neoliberal capitalism is the remodeling of the global political economy to facilitate capital accumulation from migration amidst serious fault lines that reflect an antagonistic contradiction in the neoliberal capitalist approach to migration.
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Biographical Note

Dennis C. Canterbury, PhD. (2000) in Sociology, Binghamton University (State University of New York), is a Professor of Sociology at Eastern Connecticut State University, USA. He has published monographs and many articles on development issues including Neoliberal Democratization and New Authoritarianism (Ashgate, 2005), and European Bloc Imperialism (Brill, 2010).

Table of contents

About the Author
Preface
Acknowledgements

1. Migration and Capital Accumulation
Introduction
Argument, Method and Hypothesis
Development- cum-Globalization
Politics, Development and Migration
Structure and Organization

PART I: MIGRATION THEORY: EARLY ROOTS

2. Classical Political Economy to Neoliberal Theory
Introduction
The Classical Model, Development and Migration
Marx’s Economic Theory and Migration
The Neoclassical “Revolution”
The Keynesian “Revolution”
Development Economics and Migration
Neoliberal Theory and Migration
Conclusion

3. Poor Economic Growth with Increased Immigration
Introduction
Economic Theories of Migration: Push-Pull Approaches
Alternative Question and Counter-Proposition
Companies Hiring Illegal Immigrants
Foreign-Born Workers in the US Labor Force 2007 and 2010
Economic Growth and Unemployment 2000 – 2009
Layoffs and Separations 2007 – 2009
Industry Distribution of 2008 Mass Layoffs and Separations
Increased Migration During the Great Recession 2007 – 2009
Caribbean Migration to the US 2000 – 2009
Conclusion

PART II: NEOLIBERAL PERSPECTIVES ON DEVELOPMENT IMPACT OF MIGRATION

4. Liberalization and Financialization of Migration
Introduction
Labor Mobility and Capitalist Globalization
The General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) and Migration
“The Great Financialization”
The Financialization of Migration
Conclusion

5. The Development Impact of Remittances and Diasporas
Introduction
Diasporas and Entrepreneurship
Diasporas Role in Neoliberal Economic and Social Development
Critique of the Development Impact of Remittances and Diasporas
Remittances, Diasporas and Power: An Alternative View
Conclusion

6. The Millennium Development Goals Impact of Migration
Introduction
Description of the Millennium Development Goals
The Impact of Migration on the MDGs
Migration and the Limitations of the MDGs
Conclusion

7. The Human Development Impact of Migration
Introduction
On Theories of Human Development
Migration and Human Development
The Impact of Migration on Human Development
Migration and Cost
Migration and Health
Migration and Human Rights
Policy Reforms for Human Development Impact of Migration
Conclusion

PART III: FAULT LINES IN NEOLIBERAL VIEWS ON MIGRATION

8. Migration Fault-lines under Neoliberal Globalization
Introduction
Contradictions in the Neoliberal Approach to Migration
The Israeli Separation Walls with Egypt and Palestine
Current US-Mexico Border Issues
The US – Mexico Border Fence: “The Great Wall of Mexico”
Migration Policy Issues in the EU and US
Anti-Immigration in Theory and Practice
Pro-Immigration Mass Movements
Conclusion

9. The European Union and Migration: The Africa Connection
Introduction
The EU and Migration
Joint Africa-EU Declaration on Migration and Development (JA-EUDMD)
Critique of the Joint Africa-EU Declaration on Migration and Development
The EU and Libya
The Libyan War and Migrants
The EU and Democracy in Libya
Conclusion

10. Ideas for a Radical Approach to Migration Studies
Introduction
Some Considerations for a Radical Approach

Bibliography
Index

Readership

The book is primarily for undergraduate and graduate students, academics, policy makers, civil society agencies and activists, and the general reader interested in the subject of capital accumulation, migration and development.

Index Card

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