A New Companion to Homer

Series:

This volume is the first English-language survey of Homeric studies to appear for more than a generation, and the first such work to attempt to cover all fields comprehensively. Thirty leading scholars from Europe and America provide short, authoritative overviews of the state of knowledge and current controversies in the many specialist divisions in Homeric studies. The chapters pay equal attention to literary, mythological, linguistic, historical, and archaeological topics, ranging from such long-established problems as the "Homeric Question" to newer issues like the relevance of narratology and computer-assisted quantification. The collection, the third publication in Brill's handbook series, The Classical Tradition, will be valuable at every level of study - from the general student of literature to the Homeric specialist seeking a general understanding of the latest developments across the whole range of Homeric scholarship.
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Biographical Note

Barry B. Powell, Halls-Bascom Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is best known for his books Homer and the Origin of the Greek Alphabet ( Cambridge, 1991) and Classical Myth ( Prentice-Hall, 1995; 2nd edition, 1997). He has also published articles on Greek poetry, especially Homer, the history of writing, and the origins of Greek myth, as well as doing research in Egyptian philology.
Ian Morris is Professor of Classics at Stanford University. His research focuses on social and cultural history, and archaeological evidence. He has excavated extensively in Greece, and is the author of Burial and Ancient Society (1987) and Death-Ritual and Social Structure in Classical Antiquity (1992).

Review Quotes

' ...die Qualität der einzelnen Beiträge ist auf durchgehend hohem, fallweise höchstem Forschungsniveau...für Einsteiger wie Fortgeschrittene gleicherweise hilfreich und instruktiv.
Stefan Hiller, Anzeiger für die Altertumswissenschaft, 2002.
' This volume will certainly be useful, and in some areas indispensable.'
R.B. Rutherford, The Classical Review, 1999.

Readership

Students of Ancient Greek Literature, the History of Early Greece and the Ancient Near East.

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