The Figure of Solomon in Jewish, Christian and Islamic Tradition

King, Sage and Architect

Series:

Solomon is one of the more complex and fascinating characters in the history of Israel. As a king he is second only to David. As the king who gave Israel its temple he is unsurpassed. As the prototype of the sage his name lives on in numerous biblical and non-biblical writings. As the magician of later tradition he has established himself as a model for many other aspirants in this field.

This volume contains the proceedings of an international conference on Solomon that was held at the Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies of the University of Leuven, September 30 – October 2, 2009 and discussed various aspects of this multifaced character as he appears in Jewish, early Christian, and Islamic tradition.

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Biographical Note

Joseph Verheyden, Dr. Theol. (1987), KU Leuven, is Professor of New Testament Studies at that university. He has published and edited monographs and articles on the exegesis and the reception history of the NT. He recently co-edited W. Petersen's Collected Essays on the Diatessaron (Brill 2012).

Table of contents

Isaac Kalimi, The Rise of Solomon in the Ancient Israelite Historiography

Pekka Särkiö, Solomon in History and Tradition

Wolfgang Zwickel, Der Tempel Salomos im Kontext der Ikonographie und der archäologischen Funde

Joseph Verheyden, Josephus on Solomon

Pablo A. Torijano, Solomon and Magic

Gerhard Langer, Solomon in Rabbinic Literature

Albert L.A. Hogeterp, King Solomon in the New Testament and Jewish Tradition

Tobias Nicklas, Christus und die Oden Salomos

Peter Busch, Solomon as a True Exorcist: The Testament of Solomon in Its Cultural Setting

Jacques van der Vliet, Solomon in Egyptia Gnosticism

Witold Witakowski and Ewa Balicka-Witakowska, Solomon in Ethiopian Tradition

Jules Janssens, The Ikhwan as-Safa’ on King-Prophet Solomon



Readership

All interested in the exegesis and the reception history of the Bible in Jewish, early Christian, and Islamic tradition