Between Harmony and Discrimination: Negotiating Religious Identities within Majority-Minority Relationships in Bali and Lombok

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Between Harmony and Discrimination explores the varying expressions of religious practices and the intertwined, shifting interreligious relationships of the peoples of Bali and Lombok. As religion has become a progressively more important identity marker in the 21st century, the shared histories and practices of peoples of both similar and differing faiths are renegotiated, reconfirmed or reconfigured. This renegotiation, inspired by Hindu or Islamic reform movements that encourage greater global identifications, has created situations that are perceived locally to oscillate between harmony and discrimination depending on the relationships and the contexts in which they are acting. Religious belonging is increasingly important among the Hindus and Muslims of Bali and Lombok; minorities (Christians, Chinese) on both islands have also sought global partners.
Contributors include Brigitta Hauser-Schäublin, David D. Harnish,I Wayan Ardika, Ni Luh Sitjiati Beratha, Erni Budiwanti, I Nyoman Darma Putra, I Nyoman Dhana, Leo Howe, Mary Ida Bagus, Lene Pedersen, Martin Slama, Meike Rieger, Sophie Strauss, Kari Telle and Dustin Wiebe.
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Biographical Note

Brigitta Hauser-Schäublin is Professor of Anthropology at Göttingen University. She has carried out fieldwork in Bali since 1988. Many of her publications focus on the ritual and political organization of space and the relationship between politics and religion in the context of the Balinese state.
David D. Harnish, PhD (1991 UCLA), is Chair of Music at University of San Diego. He has published books and articles on the music cultures of Bali and Lombok, including Divine Inspirations (2011 Oxford) and Bridges to the Ancestors (2006 U-Hawai‘i).

Table of contents

Preface
Acknowledgements
List of Illustrations
Notes on Contributors

Introduction: Negotiating Religious Identities within Majority-Minority Relationships in Bali and Lombok - Brigitta Hauser-Schäublin and David D. Harnish

PART ONE: SACRED SITES AND THE DIFFERENTIATION OF BELONGING
Chapter 1 Changing Spiritual Landscapes and Religious Politics on Lombok - Kari Telle
Chapter 2 Balinese and Sasak Religious Trajectories in Lombok: Interactions, Tensions and Arts at the Lingsar Temple Festival - David D. Harnish
Chapter 3 From Subandar to Tridharma: Transformations and Interactions of Chinese Communities in Bali - Brigitta Hauser-Schäublin
Chapter 4 From Wali Songo to Wali Pitu: The Travelling of Islamic Saint Veneration to Bali - Martin Slama
Chapter 5 The Purification Movement in Bayan, North Lombok: Orthodox Islam vis-à-vis Religious Syncretism - Erni Budiwanti

PART TWO: LIVING TOGETHER – DEVELOPING DIFFERING IDENTITIES
Chapter 6 Keeping the Peace: Interdependence and Narratives of Tolerance in Hindu-Muslim Relationships in Eastern Bali - Lene Pedersen
Chapter 7 “We are one Unit”: Configurations of Citizenship in a Historical Hindu-Muslim Balinese Setting - Meike Rieger
Chapter 8 Performing Christian Kebalian: Balinese Music and Dance as Interreligious Drama - Dustin Wiebe
Chapter 9 United in Culture – Separate Ways in Religion? The Relationship between Hindu and Christian Balinese - Nyoman Dhana
Chapter 10 Inter-Religious Relationships between Chinese and Hindu Balinese in Three Villages in Bali - Ni Luh Sutjiati Beratha and I Wayan Ardika
Chapter 11 Respecting the Lakes: Arguments about a Tourism Project between Environmentalism and Agama - Sophie Strauss

PART THREE: EVERYDAY PRACTICES AND THE SEARCH FOR COMMONALITIES

Chapter 12 Ethnicity, Religion and the Economic Imperative: Some Case Studies - from the Fringes of West Bali - Mary Ida Bagus
Chapter 13 Puja Mandala: An Invented Icon of Bali’s Religious Tolerance? - I Nyoman Darma Putra
Chapter 14 Chess and an Indonesian Microcosm: A Glimpse of a Nation’s Social Dream? - Leo Howe

Index

Readership

All interested in Balinese and Lombok cultures, in post-Suharto social and religious developments in Indonesia and changing inter-religious relationships in Southeast Asia.

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