Preservation of Ecosystems of International Watercourses and the Integration of Relevant Rules

An Interpretative Mechanism to Address the Fragmentation of International Law

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In Preservation of Ecosystems of International Watercourses and the Integration of Relevant Rules: An Interpretative Mechanism to Address the Fragmentation of International Law, Lee Jing takes an innovative approach to developing an international legal framework for preserving ecosystems. Deploying Article 31(3)(c) of the 1969 Vienna Convention an analytical framework is devised that examines ‘the ecosystem approach’ under international law through the prism of Article 20 of the UN Watercourses Convention. The analysis provides an enhanced normative scope and content for the UN Watercourses Convention’s approach to the obligation to preserve, taking into account contemporary developments in international law. The work demonstrates the full potential of the Vienna Convention’s Article 31(3)(c) as an integration tool in addressing the fragmentation of international law.
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Biographical Note

Lee Jing, Ph.D. (2013), University of Dundee, is a researcher at the Institute for Environment and Development of the National University of Malaysia, Malaysia .

Table of contents

Preface and Acknowledgements
List of Abbreviations

Introduction

Chapter 1. The Fragmentation of International Law and Its Integration: Interpretation and Article 31(3)(c) of the 1969 Vienna Convention
1.1. Fragmentation of International Law on International Watercourse Ecosystems
1.2. Systemic Integration, Interpretation, and Article 31(3)(c) of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties
1.3. Article 31(3)(c) of the 1969 Vienna Convention: An Examination
1.4. Article 31(3)(c): A Tool of Integration?

Chapter 2. Relevant Preservation of Ecosystems of International Watercourses – An Ecosystem Approach 2.1. ‘Relevant’ Rules
2.2 Emergence of the Ecosystem Approach
2.3 ‘Relevant’ as Informed by the Ecosystem Approach
2.4. Concluding Remarks

Chapter 3. Rules of International Law Applicable in the Relations between the Parties: A Review of Existing Interpretation
3.1. Rules of International Law
3.2. Applicable in the Relations between the Parties
3.3. A Discussion of ‘the Parties’
3.4. The Four Possible Constructions of ‘the Parties’
3.5. Applicable in the Relations between the Parties – A Reflection

Chapter 4. Rules of International Law Applicable in the Relations between the Parties: An Interactional Theory of Law
4.1. An Interactional Theory of International Law
4.2. Lon L. Fuller’s Interactional Theory of Law and a Framework for an Interactional Theory of International Law
4.3. Concluding Remarks and a Proposal for Reinterpretation

Chapter 5. Ramsar Convention: Rules of International Law Applicable in the Relations between the Parties
5.1. Shared Understanding
5.2. Satisfaction of the Criteria of Legality
5.3. A Practice of Legality (Norm Application)
5.4. Applicable in the Relations between the Parties
5.5. Concluding Remarks

Chapter 6. Biodiversity Convention: Rules of International Law Applicable in the Relations between the Parties
6.1. Shared Understanding
6.2. Satisfaction of the Criteria of Legality
6.3. A Practice of Legality (Norm Application)
6.4. Applicable in the Relations between the Parties
6.5. Concluding Remarks

Chapter 7. Shall Take into Account, Together with the Context – Systemic Integration: An Architecture
7.1. ‘Context’
7.2. Shall be taken into Account
7.3. Case Analyses
7.4. Systemic Integration: An Architecture
7.5. Concluding Remarks

Chapter 8. Systemic Integration: An Operationalisation
8.1. Stage I: Relevant
8.2. Stage II: Rules of International Law Applicable in the Relations between the Parties
8.3. Stage III: A Systemic Integration
8.4. Concluding Remarks

Chapter 9. Preservation of Ecosystems of International Watercourses and the Integration of Relevant Rules: Reflection and Conclusion

Readership

Academics and practising lawyers in the areas of international law, international water law, international environmental law, nature conservation, and transboundary water resources management.

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