Japoniæ insulæ: The Mapping of Japan

A Historical Introduction and Cartobibliography of European Printed Maps of Japan before 1800

Series: 

Japoniæ insulæ: The Mapping of Japan systematically categorizes and provides an overview of all the European printed maps of Japan published to 1800. The author has undertaken a review of the literature, conducted an exhaustive investigation in major libraries and private collections, analyzed these findings and then compiled information on 125 maps of Japan. The introduction contains information about the mapping to 1800, the typology of Japan by western cartographers, an overview on geographical names on early modern western maps of Japan and a presentation of the major cartographic models developed for this book.

In English with Japanese summary.

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Jason Hubbard (1944) has collected maps for several decades, about which he has published in Imago Mundi, and has written a number of articles for both the printed as well as the web version of Map Forum. He is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, member of The Club of Odd Volumes in Boston, MA and of the International Map Collector’s Society.

The author was raised and educated in Mexico City and graduated from the University of the Americas with a Master’s in Business Administration. He spent 25 years with Polaroid Corporation in a variety of marketing and management assignments in Latin America, the Far East, Europe and North America. His travels, both for business and for pleasure have taken him to well over 100 countries. His passion for maps dates from 1971 when he made his first purchase, a map by Blaeu, whilst residing in Panama.
“I must confess that the moment I laid eyes on this sumptuous volume, I knew that I had to have my own copy” […] “the beautiful reproductions are a feast for the eyes” […] “taken as a whole, the cartobibliography is simply overwhelming.”
Bruce L. Batten, J.F. Oberlin University, Tokyo. In: Monumenta Nipponica, Vol. 68, No. 2 (2013), pp. 289-292.
Foreword 11
Preface 12
Acknowledgements 14
A typology of some of the early depictions of Japan by Western and indigenous cartographers 16
Introduction
1 The European mapping of Japan
Background 25
Early European mapping 26
2 Imaginary maps
The “Polo” or “Cipangu” maps 28
“Cipangu” in world and regional maps 29
3 Transitional maps
From “Cipangu” to “Giapan” 33
The “Giapan” maps 33
Ortelius’s pre-1595 multiple depictions of Japan 35
Cysat and Monte 47
Contemporary manuscript maps of Japan 48
4 The dawn of modern maps
Jesuit influence in the cartography of Japan 49
Abraham Ortelius’s Iaponiae Insulae Descriptio 50
Inácio Moreira 50
The waning influence of the Jesuits 54
5 The early seventeenth century and four decades of change 55
European mapping of Japan in the seventeenth century 57
European maps of Japan in the eighteenth century 58
European mapping of Japan’s main island’s surroundings 64
The Ry-uky-us 64
The insularity of Korea 64
North of Japan: Hokkaid-o 64
Kamchatka, Sakhalin and the Kuril Islands 68
6 European printed charts of Japanese waters
The VOC’s contribution to seventeenth-century European printed charts of Japan 72
Eighteenth-century European charts of Japan 74
7 Piracy, counterfeits and epigones 85
Definitions 86
Pirated books and maps in the seventeenth century 87
A lone example of counterfeiting 91
Increased piracy in the eighteenth century 91
8 Indigenous mapmaking 96
9 Early Japanese mapmaking 97
Buddhist world maps 100
Gy-oki-type maps 100
10 Japanese mapping of Japan in the seventeenth century
Moreira’s influence in contemporary Japanese depictions 102
Japanese progress 102
Portolan charts in Japan 104
11 Japanese maps in the eighteenth century 105
12 Geographical names on early modern Western maps of Japan
By Wolfgang Michel
Modern Romanisation 106
Processing Japanese sounds 108
Some features of early modern Japanese 109
Portuguese transliteration of Japanese 110
Dutch approaches 111
Engelbert Kaempfer’s spellings 113
Translating transliterations 115
Copying errors 115
Short-lived and new designations 116
Chinese characters on Western maps 117
Western names on maps of Japan 120
Old Western maps and present-day disputes 120
Information and interest 124

Cartobibliography
Notes on the use of the Cartobibliography 129
Glossary 130
Abbreviations 130
List of maps described:
1 1528 Benedetto Bordone, Venice 131
2 1575 André Thevet, Paris 133
3 1586 Renward Cysat, Fribourg/Freiburg 134
4 c.1586 André Thevet, Paris 136
5 1589 Giacobo Piccaglia – Urbano Monte, Milan 137
6 1595 Abraham Ortelius, Antwerp 139
7 1596 Giovanni Botero, Cologne 143
8 1598 Barent Langenes, Middelburg 145
9 1598 Abraham Ortelius – Filips Galle, Antwerp 148
10 1601 Abraham Ortelius – Johannes van Keerbergen, Antwerp 149
11 1605 Paulus Merula – Jan van Doetechum, Amsterdam 151
12 1605 Cornelis van Wytfliet, Douai 153
13 1606 Jodocus Hondius, Amsterdam 155
14 1607 Jodocus Hondius, Amsterdam 160
15 1616 Pieter Bertius – Jodocus Hondius Jr., Amsterdam 165
16 1617 Christophoro Blancus – Ignacio Moreira, Rome 167
17 1628 Johannes Janssonius – Pieter van der Keere, Amsterdam 171
18 1630 Johannes Cloppenburgh – Pieter van der Keere, Amsterdam 173
19 1641 Bernardino Ginnaro – Nicolas Perrey, Naples 176
20 1645 Pierre du Val, Paris 178
21 1646 Antonio Francisco Cardim, Rome 180
22 1646 Sir Robert Dudley – Antonio-Francesco Lucini, Florence 183
23 1647 Sir Robert Dudley – Antonio-Francesco Lucini, Florence 186
24 1648 Johannes Janssonius, Amsterdam 188
25 1652 Nicolas (I) Sanson d’Abbeville – Abraham Peyrounin, Paris 191
26 1653 Nicolas (I) Sanson d’Abbeville, Paris 193
27 1655 Joan Blaeu – Martino Martini, Amsterdam 195
28 c.1656 Pierre du Val, Paris 199
29 1658 Gabriel Bucelin, Ulm 202
30 1658 Johannes Janssonius, Amsterdam 203
31 c.1658 Philippe Briet – Pierre Mariette, Paris 206
32 c.1660 Pierre du Val, Paris 210
33 1661 François Caron – Johannes Tongerloo, The Hague 213
34 1663 François Caron – Michael en Johann Endters, Nürnberg 215
35 1663 Philippe François Taisne, Antwerp 216
36 c.1665 Sir Robert Dudley – Antonio-Francesco Lucini, Florence 217
37 c.1665-1670 Casimir Freschot – Antonio-Francesco Lucini, Venice 218
38 1668 Jacob Colom, Amsterdam 220
39 1671 François Caron – Robert Boulter, London 222
40 c.1676 John Seller, London 223
41 1678 Pierre du Val – Johann Hoffmann, Nürnberg 225
42 1679 Nicolas (I) Sanson d’Abbeville – Johann David Zunner, Frankfurt 227
43 1679 Jean-Baptiste Tavernier – Jean-Louis Durant, Paris 228
44 1679 Jean-Baptiste Tavernier, (Amsterdam? The Hague? Utrecht?) 230
45 1680 Robert Morden, London 232
46 1680 Jean-Baptiste Tavernier – Herman Moll, London 235
47 1681 Jonas Moore – Herman Moll, London 237
48 1681 Jean-Baptiste Tavernier – François Diodati, Geneva 238
49 1681 Jean-Baptiste Tavernier – Johann Jakob Vogel, Nürnberg 239
50 1683 Allain Manesson-Mallet, Paris 240
51 1683 Nicolas (I) Sanson d’Abbeville – Antoine de Winter, Utrecht 241
52 c.1684 Nicolas de Fer – Jacques Robbe, Paris 247
53 1685 Allain Manesson-Mallet – Johann David Zunner, Frankfurt 250
54 1687 Nicolas de Fer – François Halma, Utrecht 251
55 1690 Nicolas de Fer – Sebastián Fernández de Medrano, Brussels 253
56 1691 James Moxon, London 256
57 1692 Vincenzo Maria Coronelli, Venice 257
58 1692 Johann Ulrich Müller – Gabriel Conrad Bodenehr, Ulm 260
59 1696 Johann Hoffmann, Nürnberg 263
60 c.1696 Philip Lea – Herman Moll (?), London 264
61 1704 Jeremiah Seller – Charles Price, London 265
62 1705 George Psalmanazar – Pierre Mortier, Amsterdam 267
63 1705 George Psalmanazar – Pieter van der Veer, Rotterdam 269
64 1706 Pieter van der Aa, Leiden 270
65 1709 Nicolas de Fer – Francisco Laso, Madrid 276
66 1712 Herman Moll, London 278
67 1713 Jean-Baptiste Tavernier – Pierre Ribou, Paris 280
68 1715 Adriaan Reland – Wilhelm Broedelet, Utrecht 282
69 1715 Adriaan Reland – Jean Frédéric Bernard, Amsterdam 287
70 c.1715 David Mortier, Amsterdam 289
71 1716 George Psalmanazar – Daniel Walder, Augsburg 290
72 1716 Adriaan Reland – Jean-Baptiste Machuel le jeune, Rouen 291
73 1719 Zacharie Châtelain, Amsterdam 293
74 1719 Zacharie Châtelain, Amsterdam 295
75 1726 François Valentyn, Amsterdam 297
76 1727 Alexander Hamilton – Robert Mylne, Edinburgh 299
77 1727 Engelbert Kaempfer – Johann Caspar Scheuchzer, London 301
78 1728 Isaak Tirion, Amsterdam 304
79 1729 Engelbert Kaempfer – Johann Caspar Scheuchzer, The Hague 307
80 1732 Kâtib Çelebi, Constantinople 312
81 c.1732 Matthäus Seutter, Augsburg 313
82 1733 Isaak Tirion – Jonas Korte, Altona 316
83 1734 Jean-Baptiste Tavernier – Russian Academy of Sciences, Saint Petersburg 318
84 1734 Isaak Tirion – Giovanni Battista Albrizzi, Venice 319
85 1735 Jacques-Nicolas Bellin – Guillaume Dheulland, Paris 322
86 1735 Jacques-Nicolas Bellin – Guillaume Dheulland, Paris 325
87 1736 Isaak Tirion, Amsterdam 327
88 1738 Isaak Tirion – Francesco Ricciardo, Naples 329
89 1739 Nicolas de Fer – Jaime Certa, Lyon 330
90 c.1740-42 Matthäus Seutter – Tobias Conrad Lotter, Augsburg 332
91 1744 Emanuel Bowen, London 334
92 1746 Jacques-Nicolas Bellin – Firmin Didot, Paris 336
93 1747 Jacques-Nicolas Bellin – Jacob van der Schley, The Hague 338
94 1747 Jacques-Nicolas Bellin – Arkstee & Merkus, Leipzig 340
95 1747 Jacob Keyzer & Jan de Lat, Almelo & Deventer 341
96 1748 Jean-Baptiste Michel Le Bouteux, Lisbon 342
97 1748 Georges-Louis Le Rouge, Paris 343
98 1749 Jacques-Nicolas Bellin – [?], Copenhagen 346
99 1749 Engelbert Kaempfer – Johann David Schleuen, Rostock 347
100 1749 Didier Robert de Vaugondy, Paris 348
101 1750 Gilles Robert de Vaugondy, Paris 351
102 1751 Jacques-Nicolas Bellin – Pietro Valvasense, Venice 355
103 1752 Jacques-Nicolas Bellin – Pierre-François-Xavier de Charlevoix, Paris 356
104 1752 Jacques-Nicolas Bellin – Antoine-François Prévost, Paris 358
105 1753 Jacques-Nicolas Bellin – Arkstee & Merkus, Leipzig 360
106 1754 Jacques-Nicolas Bellin – Antonio Cervone, Naples 363
107 1756 Jacques-Nicolas Bellin – Jacob van der Schley, The Hague 364
108 1760 Jacques-Nicolas Bellin – Niels Prahl, Copenhagen 365
109 1763 Jacques-Nicolas Bellin, Paris 366
110 1763 Jacques-Nicolas Bellin – Johann Justinus Gebauer, Halle 367
111 c.1770 Steven van Esveldt, Amsterdam 368
112 1774 Willem Albert Bachiene – Jan van Jagen, Amsterdam 370
113 1777 Engelbert Kaempfer – Christian Wilhelm Dohm, Lemgo 372
114 1778 Gilles Robert de Vaugondy – Paolo Santini, Venice 374
115 1779 Giovanni de Baillou and Antonio da Rabatta, Florence 376
116 c.1780 Emanuel Bowen – (Florence? Venice?) 378
117 1781 Jacques-Nicolas Bellin – Vincenzo Formaleoni, Venice 380
118 1783 Louis Brion de la Tour, Paris 381
119 1784 Jacques-Nicolas Bellin – Moscow 382
120 1785 Antonio Zatta – Giovanni Pitteri, Venice 383
121 1786 Rigobert Bonne – François Gabriel Perrier, Paris 385
122 1788 Fray Juan de la Concepción – Nicolás de la Cruz Bagay, Manila 387
123 c.1790 Robert Sayer, London 388
124 1794 Giuseppe Bonatti – Pietro Zaricen, Venice 392
125 1797 Giovanni Maria Cassini, Rome 393

Appendices
Concordance of cartobibliographies (1967, 1994, & 2012) of European printed maps of Japan
Piracies, counterfeits and epigones 397
Indexes
1 Alphabetical index of maps by title 405
2 Maps on board games or playing cards 408
3 Significantly modified copperplates 408
4 Photo credits 409
5 Libraries cited 409
6 Bibliography 410
7 Names of persons 416
Summary in English 425
Table of contents in Japanese 431
Summary in Japanese 436