Hasidic Art and the Kabbalah

Series:

Hasidic Art and the Kabbalah presents eight case studies of manuscripts, ritual objects, and folk art developed by Hasidic masters in the mid-eighteenth to late nineteenth centuries, whose form and decoration relate to sources in the Zohar, German Pietism, and Safed Kabbalah. Examined at the delicate and difficult to define interface between seemingly simple, folk art and complex ideological and conceptual outlooks which contain deep, abstract symbols, the study touches on aspects of object history, intellectual history, the decorative arts, and the history of religion. Based on original texts, the focus of this volume is on the subjective experience of the user at the moment of ritual, applying tenets of process philosophy and literary theory – Wolfgang Iser, Gaston Bachelard, and Walter Benjamin – to the analysis of objects.
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Biographical Note

Batsheva Goldman-Ida, Ph.D. (2008), The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, is Curator of Special Projects at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art and specializes in visual culture, especially in the early modern period. Born in Boston, MA, she studied Decorative Arts in New York at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum and Parsons School of Design. Her latest exhibition and catalogue Alchemy of Words: Abraham Abulafia, Dada, Lettrism (2016) juxtaposes the medieval mystic with early modern innovators of linguistic mysticism and contemporary performance artists.

Review Quotes

"Batsheva Goldman-Ida's Hasidic Art and the Kabbalah sets up a visual feast that recalls the ancient Tabernacle or Temple vessels while, at the same time, expanding our notion of the sacred." - Glenn Dynner, Jewish Review of Books (Fall 2018).

Table of contents

Acknowledgements
List of Figures
Introduction

Part 1: Manuscripts



1 Hasidic Prayer Book
 Continuity and Change
 Significance
 Conclusion

Part 2: Ritual Objects



2 Hasidic Wine Cup
 Continuity and Change
 Models
 Significance
 Conclusion

3 Hasidic Seder Plate
 Continuity and Change
 Models
 Influences
 Significance
 Conclusion

4 Hasidic Sabbath Lamp
 Continuity and Change
 Models
 Significance
 Conclusion

5 The Hasidic Prayer Shawl Ornament
 Continuity and Change
 Models
 Shpanyer-Arbet
 Influences
 Significance
 Conclusion

Part 3: Folk Art



6 The Hasidic Pipe and Snuffbox
 Continuity and Change
 Models
 Significance
 Conclusion

7 Hasidic Talismans
 Continuity and Change
 Models
 Influence
 Significance
 Conclusion

8 The Hasidic Rabbi’s Chair
 Continuity and Change
 Influences
 Significance
 Conclusion

9 Conclusion
 Symbolism
 Mythic Context
 Hasidic Context
 Worship through Corporeality
 The Nature of Hasidism
 New Directions in Research

Bibliography
Index

Readership

All those interested in Hasidism, Jewish mysticism, decorative arts, and Judaica, will welcome this book that brings together original texts and rare Hasidic objects with new methodological tools of process philosophy.

Index Card

Collection Information