The Sanskrit, Syriac and Persian Sources in the Comprehensive Book of Rhazes

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This work offers a critical analysis of the Sanskrit, Syriac and Persian sources in Rhazes’ (d. 925 CE) Comprehensive Book (or al-Kitāb al-Ḥāwī), a hugely famous and highly unusual medico-pharmaceutical encyclopedia originally written in Arabic. All text material appears in full Arabic with English translations throughout, whilst the traceable Indian fragments are represented here, for the first time, in both the original Sanskrit and corresponding English translations. The philological core of the book is framed by a detailed introductory study on the transmission of Indian, Syrian and Iranian medicine and pharmacy to the Arabs, and by extensive bilingual glossaries of relevant Arabic and Sanskrit terms as well as Latin botanical identifications.

The World Award for the Book of the Year of the Islamic Republic of Iran has selected this title as one the best books of the year 2015 in the field of Islamic/ Iranian Studies.

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Biographical Note

Oliver Kahl, Ph.D. (1993), University of Manchester, is currently affiliated to the Department of Semitology at the University of Marburg. His work is concerned with the history of Islamic science, and notably with the origins of Arabic medicine and pharmacy.

Table of contents

CONTENTS
Acknowledgements ………………………………………………………………….
Preface ………………………………………………………………………………..
Introduction …………………………………………………………………………...
1. The Sanskrit Sources ………………………………………………………....
a. Ātreya ………………………………………………………………………..
b. Suśruta ……………………………………………………………………....
c. Caraka ……………………………………………………………………….
d. Vāgbhaṭa …………………………………………………………………….
e. Ravigupta …………………………………………………………………....
f. Mādhava ……………………………………………………………………..
g. Anonyma …………………………………………………………………….
2. The Syriac Sources ……………………………………………………………
a. Sargīs of Rēšʿainā ………………………………………………………….
b. Šlēmōn ………………………………………………………………………
c. Gūrgis bar Gaḇriēl bar Bōḵtyešūʿ …………………………………………
d. Hūzāyē ………………………………………………………………………
e. Iyōḇ Urhāyā …………………………………………………………………
f. Šemʿōn ………………………………………………………………….........
g. Yōḥannān bar Serāṕyōn …………………………………………………..
3. The Persian Sources ………………………………………………………….
a. Qahramān …………………………………………………………………...
b. Ibn Abī Ḫālid al-Fārisī ………………………………………………………
4. Some General Observations …………………………………………………
5. Note on Metrological Units ……………………………………………………
Texts and Translations ………………………………………………………………
1. The Sanskrit Sources …………………………………………………………
a. Ātreya ………………………………………………………………………..
b. Suśruta ………………………………………………………………………
c. Caraka ……………………………………………………………………….
d. Vāgbhaṭa …………………………………………………………………….
e. Ravigupta ……………………………………………………………………
f. Mādhava ……………………………………………………………………..
g. Anonyma …………………………………………………………………….
2. The Syriac Sources ……………………………………………………………
a. Sargīs of Rēšʿainā ………………………………………………………….
b. Šlēmōn ………………………………………………………………………
c. Gūrgis bar Gaḇriēl bar Bōḵtyešūʿ …………………………………………
d. Hūzāyē ………………………………………………………………………
e. Iyōḇ Urhāyā …………………………………………………………………
f. Šemʿōn ……………………………………………………………………….
g. Yōḥannān bar Serāṕyōn …………………………………………………..
3. The Persian Sources ………………………………………………………….
a. Qahramān ………………………………………………………………......
b. Ibn Abī Ḫālid al-Fārisī ………………………………………………………
4. Variae Lectiones from RḤ³ …………………………………………………..
List of Abbreviations and Bibliography ………………………………………….....
Glossaries …………………………………………………………………………….
1. Arabic ....………..……………………………………………………………….
a. English—Arabic ……...……………………………………………………..
b. Arabic—English …………………………………………………………….
2. Sanskrit ……………...………………………………………………………….
a. English—Sanskrit …………..………………………………………………
b. Sanskrit—English ….……………………………………………………….
3. Botanical Names ………………………………………………………………
a. English—Latin ……………………………………………………………....
b. Latin—English ………………………………………………………………

Readership

Arabists, Sanskritists, scholars of Syriac and Persian, historians of medicine and pharmacy, cultural historians, and all those interested in the transfer of scientific knowledge in premodern societies.