Anglo-German Theatrical Exchange

“A sea-change into something rich and strange?”

Series:

Through the great diversity of topics and methodologies the essays in this volume make a seminal contribution to an under-researched field at the intersection of literary and cultural criticism, comparative literature, and theatre as well as translation studies. The essays cover a wide range of texts from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century. From a broad variety of perspectives the exchange between drama and theatre of the Anglophone and the Germanophone worlds and their mutual influence are explored. While there is a focus on the successful or unsuccessful bridging of the cultural gaps, due consideration is given to the nexus between intercultural translation and mise en scène as well as the intricacies of intermedial reshaping. Always placing the analyses within the political and socio-historical contexts the essays make an innovative contribution to the aesthetics of Anglo-German theatrical exchange as well as to European cultural history.
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Review Quotes

“No reader is likely to put this book down without having learned something interesting and important about the history of the theatre in the British Isles and the German-speaking world. And if there is one respect in which this book can be said to be more than the sum of its parts, it is because of the way in which it broadens and deepens the idea of theatrical exchange. In that sense it greatly enriches the study of cultural relations and helps to point the way to the future.”
- Robert Gillett, Queen Mary University London in Angermion, (2016) Vol. 9 pp. 176-181

Table of contents

CONTENTS


RUDOLF WEISS, LUDWIG SCHNAUDER, AND DIETER FUCHS
Introduction
NORBERT BACHLEITNER
English Plays on the Austrian Lists of Banned Books
between 1750 and 1848
JOHN BULL
Trumpets and Drums in the Night: The 1956 Berliner Ensemble Season
in London and its Aftermath

SABINE COELSCH-FOISNER
From Oscar Wilde’s Fairy Tale “The Birthday of the Infanta”
to Alexander von Zemlinsky’s Tragic Opera The Dwarf

DIETER FUCHS
‘That is no country for young men’: The Reception of
Synge’s and O’Casey’s Plays in Vienna from 1914 to 1969

NORBERT GREINER
From Text (Source) to Performance (Target):
Performative Conventions and their Impact on Stage Translations

BEATRIX HESSE
Crossing Borders: The Example of Michael Frayn’s Afterlife

CHRISTOPH HOUSWITSCHKA
The Political Reception of German Drama in Great Britain
in the Period of the French Revolution

CHRISTOPHER INNES
Interchanges: From English Texts to German Productions –
A Contemporary Comparison

FRITZ-WILHELM NEUMANN
Alan Ayckbourn’s Season’s Greetings in Translation:
Mind the Cultural Gap
MICHAEL RAAB
No More Beautiful Losers: New Scottish Drama
at Home and in the German-speaking Theatre

BERNHARD REITZ
Some Comparative Remarks Concerning
British and German Theatre

MARGARETE RUBIK
Jane Eyre on the German Stage

LUDWIG SCHNAUDER
“The villainy you teach me I will execute…”
Peter Zadek’s Productions of Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice
and Marlowe’s The Jew of Malta at Vienna’s Burgtheater

SUSANNE VILL
Displaying Midsummer Night’s Dreams

RUDOLF WEISS
The Return of The Silent Woman: Stefan Zweig’s
Ben Jonson Adaptation for Richard Strauss
and Ronald Harwood’s Collaboration

W. E. YATES
Razzle-dazzling Satire on the Move: Nestroy and English Theatre:
A Tale of Cultural Transfer

Notes on Contributors