Multimodality in Writing

The state of the art in theory, methodology and pedagogy


Multimodality in Writing attempts to generate and apply new theories, disciplines and methods to account for semiotic processes in texts and during text production. It thus showcases new directions in multimodal research and theorizing writing practices from a multimodal perspective. It explores texts, producers of texts, and readers of texts. It also focuses on teaching multimodal text production and writing pedagogy from different domains and disciplines, such as rhetoric and writing composition, architecture, mathematics, film-making, science and the newsroom. Multimodality in Writing explores the kinds of methodological approaches that can augment social semiotic approaches to analyzing and teaching writing, including rhetoric, Systemic Functional Linguistics, ethnographic approaches, and genre pedagogy. Much of the research shows how the regularities of modes and interest of sign makers are socially shaped to realize convention. Because of this, the approaches are strongly underpinned by social and cultural theories of representation and communication.
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Biographical Note

Arlene Archer, Ph.D., is the co-ordinator of the Writing Centre at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. Her research draws on popular culture and multimodal pedagogies to enable student access to writing and to Higher Education. Esther Odilia Breuer, Ph.D., Cologne University, is Head of the Centre for Writing Competency at that university. Her main research interests lie in writing and the cognitive processes underlying (FL) writing. Contributors are: Elisabetta Adami, Jehad Alshwaikh, Anders Björkvall, Vince Connelly, Øystein Gilje, Stephen Hill, Michael O’Toole, Robert James McMurtrie, Nurit Peled-Elhanan, Daniel Perrin, Karen Press, Briana Ronan, Mona Sakr, Charalampia Sidiropoulou, John Trimbur, Mary Wild.


Those interested in the way that communication involves different modes, and how different modes are used by writers for generating meaning – in a first as well as second or foreign language.