Image and Incarnation

The Early Modern Doctrine of the Pictorial Image

Series:

The doctrine of the Incarnation was wellspring and catalyst for theories of images verbal, material, and spiritual. Section I, “Representing the Mystery of the Incarnation”, takes up questions about the representability of the mystery. Section II, “Imago Dei and the Incarnate Word”, investigates how Christ’s status as the image of God was seen to license images material and spiritual. Section III, “Literary Figurations of the Incarnation”, considers the verbal production of images contemplating the divine and human nature of Christ. Section IV, “Tranformative Analogies of Matter and Spirit”, delves into ways that material properties and processes, in their effects on the beholder, were analogized to Christ’s hypostasis. Section V, “Visualizing the Flesh of Christ”, considers the relation between the Incarnation and the Passion.
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Biographical Note

Walter Melion, Ph.D. (1988), University of California, Berkeley, is Asa Griggs Candler Professor of Art History at Emory University in Atlanta. His books include Shaping the Netherlandish Canon: Karel van Mander’s ‘Schilder-Boeck’ (Chicago: 1991) and The Meditative Art: Studies in the Northern Devotional Print, 1550–1625 (Philadelphia: 2009). He is series editor of Brill’s Studies on Art, Art History, and Intellectual History.

Lee Palmer Wandel, Ph.D. (1985), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, is Professor of History, Religious Studies, and Visual Culture at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. Recently she has published The Eucharist in the Reformation: Incarnation and Liturgy (Cambridge, 2006), and edited the Brill Companion to the Christian Tradition The Eucharist in the Reformation (Brill, 2012).

Table of contents


CONTENTS

Acknowledgements
Notes on the Editors
Notes on the Contributors
List of Illustrations

Introduction
Walter S. Melion and Lee Palmer Wandel


PART ONE
REPRESENTING THE MYSTERY OF THE INCARNATION

Medietas / Mediator and the Geometry of Incarnation
Herbert L. Kessler

Mute Mysteries of the Divine Logos: On the Pictorial Poetics of Incarnation
Klaus Krüger

A Meaty Incarnation: Making Sense of Divine Flesh for Aztec Christians
Jaime Lara

The Ineffability of Incarnation in Le Brun’s Silence or Sleep of the Child
Matthieu Somon


PART TWO
IMAGO DEI AND THE INCARNATE WORD

Thomas Aquinas, Sacramental Scenes, and the ‘Aesthetics’ of Incarnation
Mark D. Jordan

The Poetics of the Image in Late Medieval Mysticism
Niklaus Largier

Incarnation, Image, and Sign: John Calvin’s Institutes of the Christian Religion & Late Medieval Visual Culture
Lee Palmer Wandel

Eye to Eye, Text to Image? Jan Provoost’s Sacred Allegory, Jan Van Ruusbroec’s Spieghel der eeuwigher salicheit, and Mystical Contemplation in the Late Medieval Low Countries
Geert Warnar

‘A Just Proportion of Body and Soul’: Emblems and Incarnational Grafting
Christopher Wild


PART THREE
LITERARY FIGURATIONS OF THE INCARNATION

From Negative Painting to Loving Imprint in Pierre De Bérulle’s Discours (1623)
Agnès Guiderdoni

Discerning Vision: Cognitive Strategies in Cornelis Everaert’s Mary Compared to the Light (c. 1511)
Bart Ramakers

The Fountain of Life in Molinet's Roman de la rose moralisé (1500)
Michael Randall
PART FOUR
TRANSFORMATIVE ANALOGIES OF MATTER AND SPIRIT

Figuring the Threshold of Incarnation: Caravaggio’s Incarnate Image of the Madonna of Loreto
Ralph Dekoninck

Super-Entanglement: Unfolding Evidence in Hieronymus Bosch’s Mass of St. Gregory
Reindert Falkenburg

The Mystery of the Incarnation and the Art of Painting
Dalia Judovitz

Convent and Cubiculum Cordis: the Incarnational Thematic of Materiality in the Cistercian Prayerbook of Martin Boschman (1610)
Walter S. Melion


PART FIVE
VISUALIZING THE FLESH OF CHRIST

Dieu le Père en Vierge Marie. La Trinité – Pietà de Rubens
Colette Nativel

Images of the Incarnation in the Jesuit Japan Mission’s Kirishitanban Story of Virgin Martyr St. Catherine of
Alexandria
Haruko Nawata Ward

Index

Readership

All those interested in the connections between the Christian doctrine of the Incarnation and the theory and practice of the arts in the early modern world.

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