Barbarian or Greek?

The Charge of Barbarism and Early Christian Apologetics

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In her book Barbarian or Greek?: The Charge of Barbarism and Early Christian Apologetics, Stamenka Antonova examines different aspects of the charge of barbarism in the Greek and Latin Christian apologetic texts (2-4th centuries) and the various responses to it by the early Christians. The author demonstrates that the charge of barbarism encompasses a broad range of meanings, such as low social class, inadequate education, immorality, criminal activity, political treason, as well as foreign ethnicity and language. In addition to contextualizing the charge of barbarism in ancient rhetorical practices, the author also applies literary criticism and post-colonial theory to shed light on the concept of the barbarian as an ideological-rhetorical tool for othering, marginalization and persecution in the Roman Empire.
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Biographical Note

Stamenka Antonova received her Ph.D. in Religion at Columbia University specializing in Early Christianity. She has published a number of articles in her field and has also edited the volume Women in the Eastern Christian Tradition (New York: Theotokos, 2013).

Table of contents

Acknowledgements Abbreviations 1 Prologue 2 Ancient Rhetoric and the Charge of Barbarism  A The Charge of Barbarism and Early Christian Apologetics  B Ancient Rhetorical Practices and Christian Apologetic Literature  C Methodological Approaches and Theoretical Considerations: Postcolonial Theory and Literary Constructions of “Self” and “Other” 3 Conceptualizations and Representations of the “Barbarian” in Greco-Roman Literature  A Roman Literature and the Notion of the “Barbarian”: Caesar, Cicero, Tacitus, and Seneca  B Greek Literature and the Concept of the “Barbarian”: Aristides, Dios Chrysostom, and Philostratus  C Excursus: Lucian of Samotasa and the Self-defintion of the “Barbarian” 4 The Charge of Barbarism and Greek Christian Apologetic  A Justin Martyr and the Charge of Barbarism  B Tatian and the Charge of Barbarism  C Clement of Alexandria and the Charge of Barbarism  D Origen of Alexandria and the Charge of Barbarism  E Origen of Alexandria: The Charge of Barbarism and Ethnic Slander  F Eusebius of Caesarea and the Charge of Barbarism 5 The Charge of Barbarism and Latin Christian Apologetic  A Tertullian and the Charge of Barbarism  B Arnobius of Sicca and the Charge of Barbarism  C Lactantius and the Charge of Barbarism 6 Epilogue Bibliography Index

Readership

All interested in the history of early Christianity and the late Roman Empire, as well as the social and rhetorical dynamic of religious opposition and marginalization

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