European External Action Service

Promoting Coherence through Autonomy and Coordination

Series: 

Author: Mauro Gatti
In European External Action Service, Mauro Gatti provides a legal analysis of the EU’s ‘foreign ministry’. The European External Action Service (EEAS) was created to coordinate the supranational and intergovernmental areas of EU external relations, but it is unclear whether and how it may attain this objective. Through an analysis of law and practice, Gatti demonstrates that the EEAS is capable of effectively promoting coherence in EU external relations. Although working independently from EU institutions and Member States, the EEAS can coordinate their activities at an administrative level. The EEAS is thus ideally placed to bring together EU external action instruments, including diplomatic efforts, development cooperation, and security policies.

Prices from (excl. VAT):

€157.00$194.00
Add to Cart
Mauro Gatti, PhD (2013), University of Bologna – University of Strasbourg, is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Bologna. He has published articles on EU external relations in journals such as Common Market Law Review and European Law Review.
ABBREVIATIONS
FOREWORD
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
INTRODUCTION

PART I – THE CONUNDRUM OF EXTERNAL ACTION COHERENCE: IS THE EEAS A SOLUTION?
Coherence and Consistency: Enigmatic Leitmotifs of the External Action

CHAPTER 1 – THE PRINCIPLE OF EXTERNAL ACTION COHERENCE
Section 1 – The Systemic Consistency/Coherence of Legal Orders
Section 2 – Notion of External Action Coherence
Section 3 – Legal Effects of External Action Coherence

CHAPTER 2 – IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PRINCIPLE OF COHERENCE: ON THE NEED FOR A COORDINATOR
Section 1 – Challenges for the Implementation of External Action Coherence
Section 2 – Coordination of Decision-Making: A Solution for Coherence in EU Foreign Affairs
Section 3 – Political Organs as Inadequate Coordinators of EU Foreign Affairs
Section 4 – An Administration for Coordination: Enter EEAS

PART II – STATUS OF THE EEAS: A FUNCTIONALLY AUTONOMOUS BODY
Functional Autonomy: An Elusive Concept

CHAPTER 3 – ADMINISTRATIVE AUTONOMY OF THE EEAS
Section 1 – EEAS’s Ability to Adopt Internal Administrative Decisions
Section 2 – EEAS’s Capacity to Act Externally in Administrative Matters

CHAPTER 4 – OPERATIONAL AUTONOMY OF THE EEAS
Section 1 – On the Different Approaches to Operational Autonomy
Section 2 – Extent of the EEAS’s Operational Autonomy

PART III – ACTIVITIES OF THE EEAS: COORDINATING FOREIGN AFFAIRS

CHAPTER 5 – COOPERATION WITH OTHER AUTHORITIES
Section 1 – General Considerations on the EEAS’ Duty of Cooperation
Section 2 – Consultation between the EEAS and Other Authorities
Section 3 – Exchange of Information
Section 4 – Support for the Diplomatic and Consular Missions of the Member States

CHAPTER 6 – INTEGRATION WITH OTHER AUTHORITIES
Section 1 – Integration of the EEAS in the Administration of Other Authorities
Section 2 – Integration of Other Administrations in the EEAS

CONCLUSION
REFERENCES
INDEX
Scholars and practitioners interested in EU constitutional law and external relations law, and anyone concerned with EU foreign policy, institutions and administrations.