"Another Jerusalem"

Political Legitimacy and Courtly Government in the Kingdom of New Spain (1535 - 1568)

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In ‘Another Jerusalem’: Political Legitimacy and Courtly Government in the Kingdom of New Spain (1535-1568) José-Juan López-Portillo offers a new approach to understanding why the most densely populated and culturally sophisticated regions of Mesoamerica accepted the authority of Spanish viceroys. By focusing on the routines and practices of quotidian political life in New Spain, and the ideological affinities that bound indigenous and non-indigenous political communities to the viceregal regime, López Portillo discloses the formation of new loyalties, interests and identities particular to New Spain. Rather than the traditional view of European colonial domination over a demoralized indigenous population, New Spain now appears as Mexico City’s sub-empire: an aggregate of the Habsburg ‘composite monarchy’.

"Embellished with wonderful illustrations, this work draws upon extensive secondary and primary sources. Scholars studying Spain's America will find it a thoughtful addition to historical literature on 16th-century New Spain."
M. A. Burkholder, University of Missouri - St. Louis, CHOICE, July 2018 Vol. 55 No. 11
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EUR €120.00USD $138.00

Biographical Note

José-Juan López-Portillo Ph.D. (2012), Queen Mary University of London, is a Professor of International History at CIDE in Mexico City. He works on the ‘first globalisation’ that occurred from 15th-17th centuries including an edited volume Spain, Portugal and the Atlantic Frontier of Medieval Europe (Ashgate, 2013).

Review Quotes

"Embellished with wonderful illustrations, this work draws upon extensive secondary and primary sources. Scholars studying Spain's America will find it a thoughtful addition to historical literature on 16th-century New Spain."
M. A. Burkholder, University of Missouri - St. Louis, CHOICE, July 2018 Vol. 55 No. 11

Readership

All interested in the history of the Spanish Empire and the interactions between different cultures it encompassed; conversion; and court-studies.

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