Handbook of Indigenous Religion(s)

Series:

Extremely distant and distinct indigenous communities have over recent decades become more like themselves and more like each other – a paradox prevalent globally but inadequately explained by established analytical frames, particularly with regard to religion. Addressing this rich and unfolding context, the Handbook of Indigenous Religion(s) engages a wide variety of locations and perspectives. Drawing upon the efforts of a diverse group of scholars working at the intersection of indigenous studies and religious studies, this volume includes a programmatic introduction that argues for new ways of conceptualizing the field of indigenous religion(s), numerous case study-based examples, and an Afterword by Thomas Tweed.
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Biographical Note

Greg Johnson, Ph.D. (2003), University of Chicago, is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Colorado. Johnson studies indigenous traditions and law, with a focus on burial protection, repatriation, and sacred land disputes in Native American and Hawaiian contexts.



Siv Ellen Kraft, Ph.D (1999), University of Bergen, is Professor of Religious Studies at UiT – the Arctic University of Norway. Kraft studies contemporary indigenous religion(s), with a particular focus on the Sami.



Contributors are:



Greg Alles

Department of Religious Studies

McDaniel College



Natalie Avalos

Department of Religious Studies

Connecticut College



Steve Bevis

Department of Indigenous Education and Research

The University of Newcastle, Australia



Cato Christensen

Department of International Studies and Interpreting

Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences



James Cox

Department of Religious Studies

The University of Edinburgh


Trude Fonneland

Department of Cultural Sciences

UiT. The Arctic University of Norway



Rosalind Hackett

Department of Religious Studies

University of Tennessee



Duane Jethro

Centre for Anthropological Research on Museums and Heritage

Humboldt University, Berlin



Greg Johnson

Department of Religious studies

University of Boulder, Colorado.



Takeshi Kimura

Faculty of Philosophy

University of Tsukuba, Japan



Siv Ellen Kraft

Department of History, Archeology and Religious Studies

UiT. The Arctic University of Norway



Arkotong Longkumer

Religious Studies

The University of Edinburgh



Michael McNally

Department of Religion

Carleton College



Minna Opas

School of History, Culture and Arts Studies

University of Turku



Suzanne Owen

Department of Religious Studies

Leeds Trinity University



Jon Henrik Ziegler Remme

Department of Social Anthropology

University of Oslo



Claire Scheid

The Study of Religions Department

National University of Ireland-University College Cork



Seth Schermerhorn

Religious Studies Department

Hamilton College



Bjørn Ola Tafjord

Department of History, Archeology and Religious Studies

UiT. The Arctic University of Norway



Thomas Tweed

Department of American Studies

University of Notre Dame



David Walsh

Department of Religious Studies

Gettysburg College



John Ødemark

Department of Culture Studies and Oriental Languages

The University of Oslo

Review Quotes

"Because of its interdisciplinary relevance and extraordinary geographic and theoretical scope, this book is indispensable to scholars of religious studies and indigenous studies. It clearly maps out key conversations and debates across multiple fields of inquiry, highlighting areas that could benefit from further attention."

Elizabeth Lowry, Arizona State University, Reading Religion, December 13, 2017

Table of contents

Preface



Introduction

Greg Johnson and Siv Ellen Kraft

1 Towards a Typology of Academic Uses of ‘Indigenous Religion(s)’, or, Eight (or Nine) Language Games That Scholars Play with This Phrase

Bjørn Ola Tafjord

2 Religion as Peoplehood: Native American Religious Traditions and the Discourse of Indigenous Rights

Michael D. McNally

3 u.n. -Discourses on Indigenous Religion

Siv Ellen Kraft

4 Indigenous Feature Film: A Pathway for Indigenous Religion?

Cato Christensen

5 Sounds Indigenous: Negotiating Identity in an Era of World Music

Rosalind I.J. Hackett

6 Not Real Christians? On the Relation between Christianity and Indigenous Religions in Amazonia and Beyond

Minna Opas

7 Timing Indigenous Culture and Religion: Tales of Conversion and Ecological Salvation from the Amazon

John Ødemark

8 Materialising and Performing Hawaiian Religion(s) on Mauna Kea

Greg Johnson

9 Becoming Human: ‘Urban Indian’ Decolonisation and Regeneration in the Land of Enchantment

Natalie Avalos

10 Global Indigeneity and Local Christianity: Performing O’Odham Identity in the Present

Seth Schermerhorn

11 Spiritual, Not Religious; Dene, Not Indigenous: Tłįchǫ Dene Discourses of Religion and Indigeneity

David S. Walsh

12 Unsettled Natives in the Newfoundland Imaginary

Suzanne Owen

13 The Shamanic Festival Isogaisa (NORWAY): Religious Meaning-Making in the Present

Trude Fonneland

14 Are Adivasis Indigenous?

Gregory D. Alles

15 Is Hinduism the World’s Largest Indigenous Religion?

Arkotong Longkumer

16 Literacy as Advocacy in the Donyipolo Movement of India

Claire S. Scheid

17 Ethnographies Returned: The Mobilisation of Ethnographies and the Politicisation of Indigeneity in Ifugao, the Philippines

Jon Henrik Ziegler Remme

18 The Beginning of a Long Journey: Maintaining and Reviving the Ancestral Religion among the Ainu in Japan

Takeshi Kimura

19 Replacing ‘Religion’ with Indigenous Spirit: Grounding Australian Indigenous Identity in Wider Worlds

Steve Bevis

20 Of Ruins and Revival: Heritage Formation and Khoisan Indigenous Identity in Post-apartheid South Africa

Duane Jethro

21 Global Intentions and Local Conflicts: The Rise and Fall of Ambuya Juliana in Zimbabwe

James L. Cox

Afterword: The Study of Religion and the Discourses of Indigeneity

Thomas A. Tweed



Index

Readership

All interested in contemporary indigenous religions and comparative, global studies of indigeneity. The volume is relevant for research libraries, scholars and students in religious studies, indigenous studies, and cognate fields.