Ordinary Jerusalem 1840-1940

Opening New Archives, Revisiting a Global City

Series:

In Ordinary Jerusalem, Angelos Dalachanis, Vincent Lemire and thirty-five scholars depict the ordinary history of an extraordinary global city in the late Ottoman and Mandate periods. Utilizing largely unknown archives, they revisit the holy city of three religions, which has often been defined solely as an eternal battlefield and studied exclusively through the prism of geopolitics and religion. At the core of their analysis are topics and issues developed by the European Research Council-funded project “Opening Jerusalem Archives: For a Connected History of Citadinité in the Holy City, 1840–1940.” Drawn from the French vocabulary of geography and urban sociology, the concept of citadinité describes the dynamic identity relationship a city’s inhabitants develop with each other and with their urban environment.
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Biographical Note

Angelos Dalachanis, PhD (2011, European University Institute), is a fellow of the French School at Athens and a member of the core team of the ERC-funded project Open Jerusalem. His research interests include urban societies and migration in the eastern Mediterranean in the modern period. He is the author of The Greek Exodus from Egypt: Diaspora Politics and Emigration, 1937–1962 (Berghahn, 2017).


Vincent Lemire, PhD (2006, University of Provence), is Associate Professor at Paris-Est Marne-la-Vallée University and director of the ERC-funded project Open Jerusalem. He is the author of several works on the history of Jerusalem, including La soif de Jérusalem: essai d’hydrohistoire 1840–1948 (Publications de la Sorbonne, 2010), Jérusalem 1900: la ville sainte à l’âge des possibles (Armand Colin, 2013), and he is the editor of Jérusalem: Histoire d’une ville-monde (Flammarion, 2016).

Readership

All interested in the history of Jerusalem, Palestine and the Middle East, the urban history of the late Ottoman period and Mandate periods and those concerned in the archival material of Jerusalem.

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