New Perspectives on the Structure of Transnational Criminal Justice

Series:

National criminal justice systems are slowly integrating in an effort to combat cross border criminality. New Perspectives on the Structure of Transnational Criminal Justice provides a forum for critical perspectives on this evolving system, with the goal of testing and challenging conceptions of transnational criminal law. Collectively, the papers in this special issue investigate the main symbolic and material characteristics of this space of justice, how it is organized and what dynamics shape its functionality and impact.
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Biographical Note

Professor Neil Boister, Ph.D (1998), is Professor of Criminal law at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch New Zealand. Author of a range of texts on transnational criminal law including An Introduction to Transnational Criminal Law (Second edition forthcoming OUP, 2018) in 2014 he was awarded the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Prize from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in Germany for his work on transnational criminal law.

Mikkel Jarle Christensen is an associate professor in the Danish National Research Foundation’s Centre of Excellence for International Courts (iCourts) hosted by the Faculty of Law, University of Copenhagen. He is also senior researcher in the Global Justice Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto. He has published on the sociology of law in the fields of policing, international and transnational criminal justice and has recently co-edited an innovative volume that links these fields: International Practices of Criminal Law: Social and Legal Perspectives (with Ron Levi, Routledge 2017).

Table of contents


New Perspectives on the Structure of Transnational Criminal Justice
Mikkel Jarle Christensen and Neil Boister
 Transnational Criminal Justice: Its Politics and Practices
 I Politics, Law and Social Dynamics
 II Structure of the Special Issue
The ‘Bad Global Citizen’, ‘Naked’, in the ‘Transnational Penal Space’
Neil Boister
 Abstract
 Keywords
 Introduction
 I The Transnational Criminal as a ‘Bad Global Citizen’
 II The Mechanics of Creating a Transnational Penal Space
 III The ‘Bad Global Citizen’, ‘Naked’ in the ‘Transnational Penal Space’
 IV ‘Global Citizenship’ for ‘Bad Global Citizens’
 Conclusion: Why Bother with the ‘Bad Global Citizen’?
Treaty Monitoring and Compliance in the Field of Transnational Criminal Law
Cecily Rose
 Abstract
 Keywords
 I Introduction
 II The Relative Paucity of Treaty Monitoring in the Transnational Criminal Law Field
 III Possible Explanations for the Relative Absence of Treaty Monitoring in the Field of Transnational Criminal Law
 IV Some Concluding Observations on the Implications of Sparse Monitoring of Transnational Criminal Law Treaties
Transnational Organization, Transnational Law and the Ambiguity of Interpol in a World Ruled with Law
James Sheptycki

 Abstract
 Keywords
 Introduction
 I The Constitution of Interpol
 II The Commission for the Control of Interpol’s Files
 III Interpol Organization and the Red Notice System
 IV Conclusion: Transnational Legal Orders as Transnational Rule with Law
 Acknowledgements
The Social Structure of Transnational Criminal Justice: A Cluster of Spaces beyond National Borders
Mikkel Jarle Christensen
 Abstract
 Keywords
 Introduction
 I Theoretical Perspective and Empirical Material
 II From International to Transnational Criminal Law and Justice
 III The Social Structure of Transnational Criminal Justice
 IV The Structure and Effects of the Four Spaces of Practice
 Concluding Remarks

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