‘Intoxicating Shanghai’ – An Urban Montage

Art and Literature in Pictorial Magazines during Shanghai’s Jazz Age

Series:

Author: Paul Bevan
In Intoxicating Shanghai Paul Bevan explores the work of a number of Chinese modernist figures in the fields of literature and the visual arts, with an emphasis on the literary group the New-sensationists and its equivalents in the Shanghai art world, examining the work of these figures as it appeared in pictorial magazines. It undertakes a detailed examination into the significance of the pictorial magazine as a medium for the dissemination of literature and art during the 1930s. The research locates the work of these artists and writers within the context of wider literary and art production in Shanghai, focusing on art, literature, cinema, music, and dancehall culture, with a specific emphasis on 1934 – ‘The Year of the Magazine’.

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Acknowledgements
Note on the Illustrations
Note on Copyright
Illustrations
Notes on Romanization and References
Abbreviations

Part 1: Introductory Chapters


So This Is Shanghai!

1 Literature and the Pictorial Magazine

2 Art and the Pictorial Magazine

Story One: ‘Huilixian’ 回力線 Hai Alai Scenes by Hei Ying

Part 2: Lu Xun: Art Aficionado and Critic


3 Politics, Art and the Pictorial Magazine

Story Two: ‘Luotuo Nicaizhuyizhe yu nüren’ 駱駝尼采主義者與女人 (Camel, Nietzscheanist and Woman) by Mu Shiying

4 Two Critiques by Lu Xun

Story Three: ‘Molü shan de xiaojie’ 墨綠衫的小姐 (The Lady in the Inky-Green Cheongsam) by Mu Shiying

Part 3: The Rise and Rise of the Pictorial Magazine


5 ‘The Year of the Magazine’, 1934

6 Manhua Artists and the Pictorial Magazine – Guo Jianying, Huang Miaozi and Ye Qianyu

Story Four: ‘Sharen weisui’ 殺人未遂 (Attempted Murder) by Liu Na’ou

Part 4: The Shanghai Jazz Age


7 Cinema, Literature and the Pictorial Magazine, 1934

8 Jazz and Popular Music in Shanghai’s Dancehalls

Such is Shanghai!
Appendix: Notes on Source Material
Bibliography
Index
All those interested in modern art, literature, cinema and popular music in 1930s Shanghai, and anyone concerned with print culture, magazines and the publishing industry during the Chinese Republican Era.