Theology of Religions

Through the Lens of ‘Truth-as-Openness’

Series:

In Theology of Religions Graham Adams maps and analyses the field of ‘theology of religions’ (ToR) and its various typologies, examining the assumptions in how religion is assessed. The purpose is to identify how contributions to ToR select and deselect material and trajectories, editing according to presuppositions and interests. Adams’ analysis consciously relies on Andrew Shanks’ Hegelian notion of ‘truth-as-openness’ (divine hospitality) as it illuminates three dynamics, or ‘scandals’, within ToR. The first, concerned with how a religion’s particularity or identity is constructed, is subdivided between ‘particularity transcended’ and ‘particularity re-centred’, along the lines of Jenny Daggers’ postcolonial insights. The second concerns the interactions when one religion engages an Other’s strangeness, and the third is concerned with how religions aim to transform socio-political systems that feign or obstruct universality, so as to effect ever greater solidarity. The text notes key trends, beyond Christianity and including deepening interdisciplinarity, and potential developments from a critical but constructive standpoint.

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Biographical Note
Graham Adams, Ph.D. (2008), University of Leeds, is Tutor in Mission Studies at Luther King House, Manchester. Constantly engaging with Andrew Shanks’ work, he has published Christ and the Other (Ashgate, 2010) and chapters on ‘Empire’ and theology of religions.
Table of contents
Theology and Migration
Ilsup Ahn
 Part 1. Introduction—an Overview of the Recent Works on Theology of Migration
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 Part 2. A Christological Reflection on Migration and State Terror
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 Part 3. Criminalization, Apophatic Theology, and Giftful Migrants
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 Part 4. The Global Migration of People and Missio Spiritus
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 Part 5. Conclusion—Toward a Trinitarian Ecclesiology of Migration
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Readership
Academic libraries, academic specialists, post-graduates and undergraduate students in other areas of theology, religious studies, philosophy, and possibly postcolonial studies; and practitioners in interreligious engagement – all interested in how theologies assess religions.
Index Card