Ostraca from the Temple of Millions of Years of Thutmose III

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In Ostraca from the Temple of Millions of Years of Thutmose III, Fredrik Hagen publishes a range of texts from recent excavations at Thebes. Although fragmentary, it is one of the richest corpora that have come to light for a generation, in terms of both the number of ostraca and the different types of texts represented, and provides essential new data for anyone interested in ancient Egyptian temples, religion, priests, and social history.

The texts shed light on many aspects of life in an Egyptian temple, including the building of the temple, the daily operations of its cult, the organisation and size of the priesthood, types and quantities of offerings, as well as the broader cultural issues of literacy and the transmission of literature.

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Fredrik Hagen, Ph.D. (2006), University of Cambridge, is Professor of Egyptology at the University of Copenhagen. He has published a number of articles and monographs on ancient Egypt, including New Kingdom Ostraca from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge (Brill, 2011).
Preface
List of Figures and Tables
Notes on Organisation, Transliteration and Transcription
Abbreviations and Standard Reference Works

1 Introduction
 1 Administrative Documents
 2 Accounts
 3 Records of Work
 4 Name-Stones and Name Lists
 5 Letters and Messages
 6 Varia
 7 Literary Compositions
 8 Figured Ostraca
 9 Dockets and Other Objects
 10 Distribution of Texts
 11 Archaeological Context

2 Catalogue
 1 Administrative Texts
 2 Dockets
 3 Literary Texts
 4 Figured Ostraca

3 Fragments without a Separate Entry in the Catalogue

4 Concordance List of Excavation Numbers and Sigla

5 Concordance List of Sigla and Excavation Numbers

6 Concordance List of Find Coordinates, Sigla, and Excavation Numbers

Bibliography
Indices of Egyptian Words
Plates
Anyone interested in ancient Egyptian temples, religion, and priests, as well as the social and economic history of the New Kingdom (c. 1500-1000 BC).
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