Gregory of Nyssa, Augustine of Hippo, and the Filioque

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In this volume, Chungman Lee offers a concise yet thorough evaluation of the contemporary discussion on the filioque and the remaining issues still at stake. Lee examines the trinitarian theologies of Gregory of Nyssa and Augustine of Hippo, as representative of, respectively, the eastern and western patristic traditions. He demonstrates that they share similar ideas on the monarchy of the Father and on the role of the Son in the procession of the Holy Spirit, notwithstanding their slightly different expressions and perspectives. As such, the present study seeks to work towards a common patristic foundation for reconciliation between East and West on the problem of the filioque.

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Chungman Lee, Th.D. (2020), Theologische Universiteit Kampen, is a lecturer of Systematic Theology at the Korea Theological Seminary in Cheonan and an assistant pastor at the Namchun Presbyterian Church in Busan.
Acknowledgements
Abbreviations

1 Introduction
 1 The Filioque Again?
 2 Validity of Renewed Reflection
 3 Questions

2 What Is Still at Stake?
 1 Introduction
 2 The Memorandum of 1981
 3 What Is Still at Stake? (I)
 4 The Vatican Clarification of 1995
 5 What Is Still at Stake? (II)
 6 What Is Still at Stake? (III)
 7 Analytic Summary

3 Gregory of Nyssa
 1 Introduction
 2 Introduction to Gregory’s Trinitarian Thought
 3 The Monarchy of the Father
 4 The Role of the Son
 5 The Hypostatic Property of the Holy Spirit

4 Augustine of Hippo
 1 Introduction
 2 Introduction to Augustine’s Trinitarian Thought
 3 The Monarchy of the Father
 4 The Son as Principium
 5 The Hypostatic Property of the Holy Spirit

5 Conclusion: Comparison and Contribution
 1 Introduction
 2 Comparison between Gregory and Augustine
 3 Contribution
 4 Conclusion

Bibliography
Index
All interested in the theological discussion on the filioque and its patristic foundation, and anyone concerned with the trinitarian theologies of Gregory of Nyssa and Augustine of Hippo.
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